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Dumb comments you often see or hear

TheGreatCthulhu

The Great Old One, Star Spawn, Sleeper of R'lyeh
ZD Legend
Joined
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Location
United States of America
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Male
Batman vs Superman suddenly reminded me of "Can he beat Goku tho?" comments. It has become from annoying comment to a meme
It literally depends on which version of Superman we're discussing.

If it was say Goku with Ultra Instinct versus say, Cosmic Armor Superman, then Cosmic Armor Superman (one of the most powerful versions of Superman) would beat him easily.

Some versions of Superman would lose to Goku, some versions of Goku lose to Superman. So in deciding a versus battle between them, you'd want to specify which versions of the characters you're talking about.
 

Dio

~ It's me, Dio!~
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Location
England
Gender
Absolute unit
When people complain about 40 degree heat in the UK and the dumb commenters say things like:

'Well just stay in the Air Conditioning or go for a swim'

Yeah like we can all just jump into all these random swimming pools we have lying around. Also we don't widely have AC in the UK, it's not been a hot country the past few thousand years and it's not been as widely adopted as it is in hot places like Singapore. Besides it is no use to outdoor workers who need to toil in the heat all day.
 

Dizzi

magical internet cat....
ZD Legend
Joined
Jun 22, 2016
When people complain about 40 degree heat in the UK and the dumb commenters say things like:

'Well just stay in the Air Conditioning or go for a swim'

Yeah like we can all just jump into all these random swimming pools we have lying around. Also we don't widely have AC in the UK, it's not been a hot country the past few thousand years and it's not been as widely adopted as it is in hot places like Singapore. Besides it is no use to outdoor workers who need to toil in the heat all day.
D it affects you!? i thought you walked around under a blanket of ice!!!!
 

Dio

~ It's me, Dio!~
Joined
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Location
England
Gender
Absolute unit
D it affects you!? i thought you walked around under a blanket of ice!!!!

I don't like heat at all. I personally strap ice packs to my body if I can't access air conditioning. An ice blanket would get very messy once it melted
 

Dizzi

magical internet cat....
ZD Legend
Joined
Jun 22, 2016
I don't like heat at all. I personally strap ice packs to my body if I can't access air conditioning. An ice blanket would get very messy once it melted
yea we know vampy!!! :cool:
 

mαrkαsscoρ

Mr. SidleInYourDMs
ZD Legend
Joined
May 5, 2012
Location
American Wasteland
7920ceb31590e22e3877f3ff5b72ff08.png


this stupid ****, where dumb mfers act like everyone has to experience everything ever the moment they come out
 

TheGreatCthulhu

The Great Old One, Star Spawn, Sleeper of R'lyeh
ZD Legend
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Location
United States of America
Gender
Male
I find it amusing when people look at ancient texts translated from its native language into English and it's clear the author was using metaphorical language, and people still try to take it literally.

Like people believe the Ancient Greeks couldn't see blue because Homer describes the sea in the Iliad and the Odyssey as being "dark wine" in color, and in those same works, he describes the sky as being "brazen" or "unyielding iron."

Look, it's clear the text is being metaphorical. Sure the sea is sometimes blue, but sometimes its green depending on the algae and sediments and the angle of the light hitting it, and hell, if you've ever been on a beach during a sunset, you've seen the sea take on a dark red color.

And sure, sometimes the sky is blue, but sometimes it can be bright, and dare I say, almost bronze like in color, or, indeed, brazen? And sometimes it can take on a characteristic of being dark and ominous with thunder clouds, and, dare we say, pitiless and unyielding like iron.

Again, it's metaphorical language, Homer wasn't saying the sea is literally dark red in color, nor was he saying the sky was literally bronze or iron in color. People do this all the time, so why would we expect Homer to suddenly stop speaking metaphorically and hyperbolically and start speaking literally just because his metaphors and hyperbolic statements about the sea and sky don't make literal sense when translated from Ancient Greek to modern English?

According to the Norsemen, the Sun was red, as is gold, but the Sun isn't literally red, nor is gold literally red. So a lot of those passages in the Prose or Poetic Eddas or the Viking Sagas describing the "red sun" suddenly make more sense now, don't they? They aren't literally saying the Sun is red, nor was gold red, they are being metaphorical and hyperbolic.

I mean, it'd be like assuming that Jesus was speaking literally when he was discussing false prophets as being, "trees who don't bear good fruit." Are we to assume that Jesus is speaking literally? That'd be absurd, because people who lie aren't literal fruit trees. It's clear that Jesus is speaking metaphorically to illustrate a point.

Go through any ancient text now, and remember that you shouldn't always assume that people were literally describing things as they are, but were instead speaking hyperbolically and metaphorically and suddenly, a lot of those crazy passages start to make a little more sense.

And if you still aren't convinced, here's a basic one that we do all the time.

This is white wine:

White wine - Wikipedia


It's not literally white, is it? It's more of a yellowish color. But why do we call it white wine?

Well, we make it from white grapes of course!

Green Grape Isolated On White Background Stock Photo - Download Image Now - White  Grape, Grape, White Background - iStock


But those aren't literally white in color, are they? They're green.

Remember, that in this context, white wine and white grapes are a categorization to distinguish from red wine and red grapes.

Red wine - Wikipedia


Save on Red Grapes Seedless Organic Order Online Delivery | Giant


But red wine and red grapes aren't literally red in color are they? It's more of a reddish-purplish color.

Remember that color isn't always literal in its categorization, and remember that ancient authors of ancient texts weren't always speaking literally, then a lot of those strange passages in the Bible, the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Prose and Poetic Eddas, or insert whatever religious or ancient text you want here, will start to make way more sense.
 
Last edited:

Dizzi

magical internet cat....
ZD Legend
Joined
Jun 22, 2016
I find it amusing when people look at ancient texts translated from its native language into English and it's clear the author was using metaphorical language, and people still try to take it literally.

Like people believe the Ancient Greeks couldn't see blue because Homer describes the sea in the Iliad and the Odyssey as being "dark wine" in color, and in those same works, he describes the sky as being "brazen" or "unyielding iron."

Look, it's clear the text is being metaphorical. Sure the sea is sometimes blue, but sometimes its green depending on the algae and sediments and the angle of the light hitting it, and hell, if you've ever been on a beach during a sunset, you've seen the sea take on a dark red color.

And sure, sometimes the sky is blue, but sometimes it can be bright, and dare I say, almost bronze like in color, or, indeed, brazen? And sometimes it can take on a characteristic of being dark and ominous with thunder clouds, and, dare we say, pitiless and unyielding like iron.

Again, it's metaphorical language, Homer wasn't saying the sea is literally dark red in color, nor was he saying the sky was literally bronze or iron in color. People do this all the time, so why would we expect Homer to suddenly stop speaking metaphorically and hyperbolically and start speaking literally just because his metaphors and hyperbolic statements about the sea and sky don't make literal sense when translated from Ancient Greek to modern English?

According to the Norsemen, the Sun was red, as is gold, but the Sun isn't literally red, nor is gold literally red. So a lot of those passages in the Prose or Poetic Eddas or the Viking Sagas describing the "red sun" suddenly make more sense now, don't they? They aren't literally saying the Sun is red, nor was gold red, they are being metaphorical and hyperbolic.

I mean, it'd be like assuming that Jesus was speaking literally when he was discussing false prophets as being, "trees who don't bear good fruit." Are we to assume that Jesus is speaking literally? That'd be absurd, because people who lie aren't literal fruit trees. It's clear that Jesus is speaking metaphorically to illustrate a point.

Go through any ancient text now, and remember that you shouldn't always assume that people were literally describing things as they are, but were instead speaking hyperbolically and metaphorically and suddenly, a lot of those crazy passages start to make a little more sense.

And if you still aren't convinced, here's a basic one that we do all the time.

This is white wine:

White wine - Wikipedia


It's not literally white, is it? It's more of a yellowish color. But why do we call it white wine?

Well, we make it from white grapes of course!

Green Grape Isolated On White Background Stock Photo - Download Image Now - White  Grape, Grape, White Background - iStock


But those aren't literally white in color, are they? They're green.

Remember, that in this context, white wine and white grapes are a categorization to distinguish from red wine and red grapes.

Red wine - Wikipedia


Save on Red Grapes Seedless Organic Order Online Delivery | Giant


But red wine and red grapes aren't literally red in color are they? It's more of a reddish-purplish color.

Remember that color isn't always literal in its categorization, and remember that ancient authors of ancient texts weren't always speaking literally, then a lot of those strange passages in the Bible, the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Prose and Poetic Eddas, or insert whatever religious or ancient text you want here, will start to make way more sense.
We can save on red grapes?!
 
Joined
Jul 1, 2018
Location
Canada
I find it amusing when people look at ancient texts translated from its native language into English and it's clear the author was using metaphorical language, and people still try to take it literally.

Like people believe the Ancient Greeks couldn't see blue because Homer describes the sea in the Iliad and the Odyssey as being "dark wine" in color, and in those same works, he describes the sky as being "brazen" or "unyielding iron."

Look, it's clear the text is being metaphorical. Sure the sea is sometimes blue, but sometimes its green depending on the algae and sediments and the angle of the light hitting it, and hell, if you've ever been on a beach during a sunset, you've seen the sea take on a dark red color.

And sure, sometimes the sky is blue, but sometimes it can be bright, and dare I say, almost bronze like in color, or, indeed, brazen? And sometimes it can take on a characteristic of being dark and ominous with thunder clouds, and, dare we say, pitiless and unyielding like iron.

Again, it's metaphorical language, Homer wasn't saying the sea is literally dark red in color, nor was he saying the sky was literally bronze or iron in color. People do this all the time, so why would we expect Homer to suddenly stop speaking metaphorically and hyperbolically and start speaking literally just because his metaphors and hyperbolic statements about the sea and sky don't make literal sense when translated from Ancient Greek to modern English?

According to the Norsemen, the Sun was red, as is gold, but the Sun isn't literally red, nor is gold literally red. So a lot of those passages in the Prose or Poetic Eddas or the Viking Sagas describing the "red sun" suddenly make more sense now, don't they? They aren't literally saying the Sun is red, nor was gold red, they are being metaphorical and hyperbolic.

I mean, it'd be like assuming that Jesus was speaking literally when he was discussing false prophets as being, "trees who don't bear good fruit." Are we to assume that Jesus is speaking literally? That'd be absurd, because people who lie aren't literal fruit trees. It's clear that Jesus is speaking metaphorically to illustrate a point.

Go through any ancient text now, and remember that you shouldn't always assume that people were literally describing things as they are, but were instead speaking hyperbolically and metaphorically and suddenly, a lot of those crazy passages start to make a little more sense.

And if you still aren't convinced, here's a basic one that we do all the time.

This is white wine:

White wine - Wikipedia


It's not literally white, is it? It's more of a yellowish color. But why do we call it white wine?

Well, we make it from white grapes of course!

Green Grape Isolated On White Background Stock Photo - Download Image Now - White  Grape, Grape, White Background - iStock


But those aren't literally white in color, are they? They're green.

Remember, that in this context, white wine and white grapes are a categorization to distinguish from red wine and red grapes.

Red wine - Wikipedia


Save on Red Grapes Seedless Organic Order Online Delivery | Giant


But red wine and red grapes aren't literally red in color are they? It's more of a reddish-purplish color.

Remember that color isn't always literal in its categorization, and remember that ancient authors of ancient texts weren't always speaking literally, then a lot of those strange passages in the Bible, the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Prose and Poetic Eddas, or insert whatever religious or ancient text you want here, will start to make way more sense.

Oh, yeah this kind of thing irritates me to no end. It's also infuriating when people try to contextualize old texts and historicities with modern-day perceptions. I'll give you an example, from the video game, "A Plague Tale: Requiem," the character Amicia is heard exclaiming "Oh Lord" whenever in stressful situations. People think her exclamations are figures of speech but this game is set in 1349 A.D, in the late Middle Ages. People were profoundly Catholic aka Christian in the Middle Ages, and therefore, an exclamation of "Oh God" or "Oh Lord" had very literal connotations. To say the Lord's name in vain was simply unfathomable to Medieval-era humans.
 

The Dashing Darknut

DD, the dashing one
Joined
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Location
Twilight Realm
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Male
While I find this more annoying than dumb, it’s when people say “first” on a comment section of something.

I just don’t see the point in saying that you’re first, especially when it’s on a small channel that doesn’t have a big audience, it’s not that surprising you’d be the first to comment, and it’s really repetitive, and I don’t see the point in it, especially when it’s sometimes seen as something impressive, when it’s not
 

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