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Things That Are on Your Mind

TheGreatCthulhu

Composer of the Night.
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Location
United States of America
Gender
Very much a dude.
Meaning and origin of another Pokemon character's name:

https://nameberry.com/babyname/lance

Btw, there's a lot of shortened names in the Pokemon franchise. Lance is short for Lancelot. Archie is short for Archibald. Maxie is short for Maximillian. Wally is short for Wallace (they probably called him Wally to distinguish him from Sootopolis Gym Leader Wallace, because apparently there are two Wallaces in this franchise). Barry can be short for a number of different names like Barrington or Bartholomew. Gary is short for Garrett, or Garrard, the older form of Gerald. Or some other "Gar" name. The Welsh matching name of Garth may also have been shortened that way.

Morty is short for Mortimer. Sordward and Shielbert's actual names are most probably Edward and Gilbert. Lillie is short for Lillian or Elizabeth or perhaps Lusamine Jr. (if sons can be named after their fathers, then daughters can be named after their mothers). Marnie is short for Marion or Marna (Marina). Leon is short for Leonard or Leopold or Leonel. Penny can be short for a number of different names like Penelope, Pandora, Paulina, Penina, Peony, Persephone, Petrona, Petunia, Peyton. And that's just a few examples, there are many other shortened names in the Pokemon franchise.

Take care and have a nice day folks,

Kat.
Wally can also be short for Walter.

If you really want your mind blown, try going through genealogies of just your own family name. If they've been Anglicized, like say a surname is Anderson, and you come across Andersson, most people are quick to assume that those two people aren't related, when they very well could be.

Even historical figures were kinda.... whatever with the spelling of their names, and English is still this way to this day.
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2023
Gender
Male
I'm always hungry at midnight. Always hungry...

And mmorpgs... keep thinking about quitting. Would probably be good for me.

And want to write my own stories. Wish I had more motivation.
 

TheGreatCthulhu

Composer of the Night.
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Location
United States of America
Gender
Very much a dude.
The history of high gain amplifiers for guitar.

Basically goes like this:

Fender makes the Fender Bassman in 1954. People go crazy over it for its power, loudness, and rich, full tone. Many people also started hot-rodding them, as people do, to make them sound better.

Across the pond, Jim Marshall, founder of Marshall Amplification, starts copying the circuit diagram of the Fender Bassman, but he adds his own tweaks based on availability of parts, taste, and what made sense for the amplifier to work. All this to fill a need, because shipping American equipment over to Britain was unfeasible at the time. This is the origin of the Marshall Bluesbreaker, made somewhere between 1964 and 1965. People lose their mind over this, as it's a distinctly British version of a Fender Bassman.

This eventually evolves into Jim Marshall in 1965 making the Marshall Super Leads or Plexis so-named because of their plexi-glass front panels.

These eventually evolve into the Marshall JCM800 in 1981, widely considered to be one of the best high gain amplifiers ever made that has appeared on thousands of hard rock and metal records.

In San Francisco, CA, Randall Smith, founder of Mesa/Boogie Amplifiers, also starts tinkering around with Fender Bassmans, eventually leading into the Mark I. The amp originally started as a practical joke, as Randall Smith essentially borrowed a Fender Princeton from his friend Country Joe, and hot-rodded it by placing the Fender Bassman's power amp section in it along with a 1x12 speaker. The resulting amplifier proved to be loud and successful, and Smith made more than 200 of these Princeton "Boogies"-a name allegedly provided by Carlos Santana by saying the amps "really boogie."

These eventually evolved into Mesa/Boogie's most sought after amplifier, the Mark IIC+ in 1984 and 1985. The Mark IIC+ was originally a modification of their earlier Mark II which was released in 1978.

Mesa/Boogie is known for creating the first true high gain amplifiers by adding in multiple cascading preamp sections, which allows the tubes to stack up enough distortion required by players.

The Mesa Mark II and the Marshall Bluesbreaker, as well as other Fender Bassman hot rods were the inspiration for another California based amp tech, Mike Soldano, to make the Soldano SLO100 in 1986.

This was an amp that caught the eye of Eddie Van Halen, who played it for a while, until he signed his deal with Peavey. Peavey then took the Soldano SLO100 as inspiration behind the famous Peavey 5150, released in 1991, which is basically a Peavey modified Soldano SLO100, which is part of the reason why it sounds so aggressive, and why the 5150 still appears on countless records. EVH eventually left Peavey to start his own brand, taking the 5150 name with him, so the previous 5150's were then rebranded as 6505 and 6505+. Same circuit, just a name change.

The massive popularity of the Soldano SLO100 is what inspired Mesa/Boogie to make their own version of it, the much loved and sought after Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier, in 1992. The Dual Rectifier is so named because it has two rectifiers in it, a tube based rectifier, or a solid state based rectifier, and it allows users to switch between the two.

I don't know who would find this interesting, but I did.
 

Chevywolf30

The one and only.
Forum Volunteer
Joined
Sep 29, 2020
Location
The Lone Star State
Gender
Manufacturer recommended settings
The history of high gain amplifiers for guitar.

Basically goes like this:

Fender makes the Fender Bassman in 1954. People go crazy over it for its power, loudness, and rich, full tone. Many people also started hot-rodding them, as people do, to make them sound better.

Across the pond, Jim Marshall, founder of Marshall Amplification, starts copying the circuit diagram of the Fender Bassman, but he adds his own tweaks based on availability of parts, taste, and what made sense for the amplifier to work. All this to fill a need, because shipping American equipment over to Britain was unfeasible at the time. This is the origin of the Marshall Bluesbreaker, made somewhere between 1964 and 1965. People lose their mind over this, as it's a distinctly British version of a Fender Bassman.

This eventually evolves into Jim Marshall in 1965 making the Marshall Super Leads or Plexis so-named because of their plexi-glass front panels.

These eventually evolve into the Marshall JCM800 in 1981, widely considered to be one of the best high gain amplifiers ever made that has appeared on thousands of hard rock and metal records.

In San Francisco, CA, Randall Smith, founder of Mesa/Boogie Amplifiers, also starts tinkering around with Fender Bassmans, eventually leading into the Mark I. The amp originally started as a practical joke, as Randall Smith essentially borrowed a Fender Princeton from his friend Country Joe, and hot-rodded it by placing the Fender Bassman's power amp section in it along with a 1x12 speaker. The resulting amplifier proved to be loud and successful, and Smith made more than 200 of these Princeton "Boogies"-a name allegedly provided by Carlos Santana by saying the amps "really boogie."

These eventually evolved into Mesa/Boogie's most sought after amplifier, the Mark IIC+ in 1984 and 1985. The Mark IIC+ was originally a modification of their earlier Mark II which was released in 1978.

Mesa/Boogie is known for creating the first true high gain amplifiers by adding in multiple cascading preamp sections, which allows the tubes to stack up enough distortion required by players.

The Mesa Mark II and the Marshall Bluesbreaker, as well as other Fender Bassman hot rods were the inspiration for another California based amp tech, Mike Soldano, to make the Soldano SLO100 in 1986.

This was an amp that caught the eye of Eddie Van Halen, who played it for a while, until he signed his deal with Peavey. Peavey then took the Soldano SLO100 as inspiration behind the famous Peavey 5150, released in 1991, which is basically a Peavey modified Soldano SLO100, which is part of the reason why it sounds so aggressive, and why the 5150 still appears on countless records. EVH eventually left Peavey to start his own brand, taking the 5150 name with him, so the previous 5150's were then rebranded as 6505 and 6505+. Same circuit, just a name change.

The massive popularity of the Soldano SLO100 is what inspired Mesa/Boogie to make their own version of it, the much loved and sought after Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier, in 1992. The Dual Rectifier is so named because it has two rectifiers in it, a tube based rectifier, or a solid state based rectifier, and it allows users to switch between the two.

I don't know who would find this interesting, but I did.
Would be interesting to see how the evolution of rock lines up with this. Just my observation, not saying you should do that next or anything.
 

TheGreatCthulhu

Composer of the Night.
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Location
United States of America
Gender
Very much a dude.
Would be interesting to see how the evolution of rock lines up with this. Just my observation, not saying you should do that next or anything.
Generally, when this started out, guitarists wanted a nice, clear tone.

Then the 60's happened, and guitarists started asking for more. More volume, more power, more tone, more distortion.

The 70's saw the birth of heavy metal with Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, and Led Zeppelin.

And the 80's carried that torch on all the way to today.

It's really funny, because there's specific stories related to equipment, such as the birth of the 4x12 speaker cabinet, the birth of the 100W amp, more distortion with the Marshall Super Leads around the time of Hendrix, Zeppelin, AC/DC, and such, and so on.

Metallica on loads of their records are quite well known for using a blend of Marshall JCM800's and Mesa/Boogie Mark IIC+ amps, a blend I know they used on Ride the Lightning and Master of Puppets.
 

Mikey the Moblin

sushi is a suspicious hello
Joined
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Location
southworst united states
Gender
Dude
Would be interesting to see how the evolution of rock lines up with this. Just my observation, not saying you should do that next or anything.
I gotchu fam
 

Uwu_Oocoo2

The flow of time do be cruel like that
ZD Legend
Forum Volunteer
Had to scrap another drawing because it was just going... not well. I screwed up coloring it and managed to overwork the paper in the process, making it next to impossible to fix. Tried to carry on with it but in the end, just not worth it. This is always so frustrating. Now back to spending several days trying to come up with a new idea.
 

Vanessa28

Angel of Darkness
Staff member
ZD Legend
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Yahtzee, Supernatural
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Angel of Darkness
As soon as I get home I'm going to wotk on my Pokemon cross stitch project. I miscounted so o e pokemon is placed one row too low but fortunately there's a lot of background behind it so I can fix it without backstitching
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2023
Gender
Male
Always get hungry around midnight, I guess because I don't eat enough during the day maybe.
But I only eat when I feel like it, even if I'm starving, so I never eat until later.

Scientists should invent a drug or something that switches off hunger for a day or so.

Also, I want Link to have a goatee.
 

MightyMario

The Couple that Shines the Brightest|Drawn by Uwu
Joined
Mar 27, 2020
Location
Florida
Image

:eyes:
please let rayman speak and not just do grunts
I’d assume they might since he already voices characters in the game (one off the top of my head is Rabbid Mario)
 

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