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My musical tunes and their unrealized greatness

Joined
Aug 18, 2012
My Mentally Inspired Tunes And Their Unrealized Greatness
Note to Reader: These are short tunes I've composed that I'm sharing for now. I don't have the proper instruments for these tunes because I don't know much when it comes to instruments or music in general. Also, when creating melodies, I just create whatever I'm inspired to create.

I personally think my melodies are awesome. If they sound like awful rubbish to you, then perhaps I just have to find a way to bring out their power and greatness to the audience. Only I know their power and greatness since I'm the one who created these melodies.

So, I hear these melodies as awesome and conveying of certain powerful scenes, while other people might hear them as nothing more than noise (i.e. meaningless rubbish). In other words, others might hear them as random tunes, plucked out on an instrument, by a baby.

In summary, the power and greatness of my melodies currently lurks in the shadows where nobody can see it but me. I will find a way to bring out that power and greatness from the shadows and into the light where the audience can clearly see it.

I have every reason to think I'm naturally creating great tunes in my head. I could've accurately reproduced (transcribed) these tunes in my head and I just have to find a way to convey their power and greatness to the audience. Or, I didn't accurately reproduce them and it would be no different than someone who has created an awesome drawing in his head, but was bad at drawing it.
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Final Note: I share all of my melodies right here in this very section. But, I'd like to share one melody I recently made, which I think is now my best one. I think it's an awesome, memorable, heavy, dramatic melody. When I say it's heavy and dramatic, I don't mean sad, morbid, or even angry. It sounds dramatic in an awesome, gothic, evil way. That's why I've chosen a heavier, more serious-sounding instrument for this melody.

If this melody doesn't sound awesome, memorable, gothic, evil, and dramatic to the audience, and people report it's instead a mediocre melody that's nothing memorable, then I'd find that frustrating since my goal as a composer is to not only create melodies that are awesome and memorable for the audience, but melodies that express whatever scene, moment, character, etc. I wish to express to my audience. When I'm not achieving this goal, and I just think I am when I'm really not, then that becomes frustrating for me.

Many good composers are able to achieve this goal. For example, famous, nursery rhymes are things many people find great, memorable, and expressing of whatever scene or message the artist intended to express to his/her audience. It's not just the lyrics that achieve this goal, but the actual melodies themselves. My goal as a composer is to create melodies that also achieve this goal. Anyway, I will give you the links to this new melody I made:

Youtube Link:


Soundcloud Link:


Music Sheet:


With that out of the way, I'm going to share the rest of my melodies. I will start off by saying a few things. Then, I'll share them. Also, I know I said I hardly knew anything about composing. But, that was in the past, and I've gained some knowledge, which is why I think my recent, best melody follows the rules of music theory. Anyway, I'll begin here:
Even though I hardly know anything about composing, I have created really good tunes in my head for now. I have created a melody that, to me, conveys something awesome. It was a melody created through channeling inspiration. I've got down the right notes and rests to this melody I hear in my mind and I got the right tempo.

The scene I envision this melody conveying would be a dark character such as Shadow the Hedgehog unleashing a magnitude of energy. What you hear playing at the higher octave is to prepare the listener for what's about to happen next. It would be a leading tune that I think people call the "bridge" in music. Therefore, this part of the melody would convey Shadow preparing to unleash.

Then you hear things playing at the lower octave and this is where Shadow unleashes his power. This part is supposed to be the chorus which conveys awesome, dark, heavy, powerful emotion. Now, this melody is supposed to be awesome, catchy, and dark. It's not just the instruments I've chosen for this melody that convey a dark, awesome mood.

It's the actual melody itself that conveys this to me. If anyone tells me that this melody conveys nothing of the sort, that it's nothing catchy, that it's "ok," or that it's all musical gibberish or something lame/awful, then perhaps it's because more things are needed to make this melody coherent for the listener and to fully bring out its intended power.

You see, there's more to making music than just having the melody down and a beat. There are so many other factors and, as long as those factors aren't met, then music might sound like gibberish or something unpleasant for the listener. Only I know what this melody is supposed to be and only I know the awesome power it has since I'm the one who created it. Other people might not know because I have yet to find a way to fully convey the melody for other listeners.

Me knowing what this melody is supposed to be is a memory. In other words, if I were to lose that memory somehow, I would perhaps see my melody as gibberish because I'd no longer know what it's supposed to be. This has, in fact, happened to me with other tunes I've made. The memory just didn't stick there and, as a result, I lost the memory and perceived my created tunes as gibberish. Fortunately, with this tune I've made, the memory is permanent.

I have also managed to bring back some of the memories of my previous tunes which means I'm back to perceiving them as amazing, catchy tunes since I now know what they're supposed to be. Anyway, I have this dark melody on a cd. But, I'll share the youtube link to this dark melody. In addition, I will also give a link to the music sheet of this melody.

With all of that being said, I'm now going to share the links to my tunes. These are simple, catchy, memorable tunes that are great and they all convey different scenes and atmospheres. Some of these tunes convey powerful and profound emotion. But said emotion might not be conveyed because these melodies might not be successfully conveyed in their current stage.

Nonetheless, I'm going to share them anyway. I do have a beat to go along with these tunes which is a beat based off of the melody itself. Hopefully, this conveys my melodies. If not, then I would have to learn more so that I can successfully convey them later on down the road.

So, before I present to you this dark tune, I'm going to present my most recent tune I've made first. It's a different dark (evil) tune and it's very powerful. It could actually be my best one (even though I said my other dark tune could be the best one). This dark tune I made is like one of those simple, powerful, repeating melodies you hear during the chorus of a song.

When you listen to the chorus of songs, you sometimes hear a simple, powerful, repeating melody being sung by a choir. Also, I know I said in the Q&A Section of this packet that I might not be accurately reproducing what I hear in my head.

But, I've gotten much better at reproducing the tunes I hear in my head. So, I think I got the exact notes to this tune down. Here's the youtube link to this dark tune. In addition to a choir instrument, you do hear a brass instrument as well. The brass gives a different feeling. It's supposed to play the other half of this melody:

https://youtu.be/7DVFoo-wOFc

Here's that same dark tune, but with a different instrument that I like:

https://youtu.be/KYvvnAuW5p4

Here's that same dark tune one more time, but sped up. When sped up, it conveys a different emotion/scene. It sounds serious and dramatic like a video game boss fight. It doesn't sound miserable or sad to me. But, it does sound like a dangerous video game level or boss fight. Again, only I can see this since I'm the one who created this melody. Others might still hear this melody as random, meaningless rubbish. Also, as a side note, when you slow down or speed up melodies, they do convey different emotions/scenes than the normal-paced melodies. Anyway, here's the link to this melody:

https://youtu.be/AIMs6WLzBtk

Now, this tune I made is a very haunting one. I'm quite sure I've accurately transcribed this melody. This melody, to me, conveys something very spooky:

https://youtu.be/H9iQzHJXDZA

Here's another tune which is a dramatic one:

https://youtu.be/rPsu4i7E39g

Now, I'll present one more tune before I present to you that other dark tune I talked about in the very beginning of this packet. I think this tune is a very cool, awesome one. It's something you'd hear during the chorus of a song. So, when you first listen to it, it might be a bit confusing to you, given that the rest of the song isn't there to give context to this tune. I have yet to create the rest of the song myself someday. For now, I'm just sharing short tunes:

https://youtu.be/5KsMmvb31Tg

Now, here's the youtube link to that dark tune I was talking about. You just hear the beat at first. Then you hear the melody later on along with the beat. It conveys something evil, awesome, and powerful. In regards to the chords I've chosen for this tune on the music sheet, they're basic chords since I don't know what chords I'm supposed to use:

https://youtu.be/vDnF99yQiIQ

(Note: In the Q&A Section of this packet, I said I might've gotten the notes wrong to this tune. Actually, I was referring to a previous version of this tune I made. This is my final attempt and I did my absolute best to get the notes right this time. Also, you can actually forget the instrument choice because they're not the awesome, dark instruments I hear in my head. This tune, along with my other ones, do have a key to them. I just don't specify that key.

But, I'll just give you the key signature to this Dark Tune which would be F minor. Again, in regards to the tunes I'm sharing, you might not understand them. Only I understand them since I'm the one who created them. I'll have to learn more about making music so I can make my melodies understandable for other listeners. Hopefully, other people will be able to understand them as they are now though).

Here is that same dark tune, but with different instruments. These instruments might sound like they're better quality:

https://youtu.be/lSVjUe_hR8I

Now, here's another recent tune and I think I got the exact right notes to it. I think I'm naturally creating great tunes in my head and I wish to share them. This recent tune is one of those great tunes. My other tunes might not really adhere to a rhythm because I didn't learn enough about music theory at the time. So, someday, I plan on changing the notes a bit so they do adhere to a rhythm. In addition, I have the time signature wrong for these tunes as well. But, I'll share these tunes anyway. With this new tune I've made, it does adhere to a rhythm and I do have the right time signature.

It's a short, simple tune that I think others would love and find catchy. Since I'm a beginner at composing, I just wish to share simple, short tunes at this point. I think that's good enough anyway because there are already simple, short tunes out there that are great. Haven't you ever heard of one? I'm quite sure you have. The Frosted Flakes tune would be an example. It has the lyrics: "Frosted Flakes are more than good. They're great!" I think I'm creating simple, great tunes like this. Another example of a simple, great tune would be a tune you'd hear when a character acquires a 1-up (extra life).

Sure, the examples I gave are short tunes. But, they're still memorable and great. This recent tune I made would be one for a video game. It would be for Sonic the Hedgehog. But, it's not the type of tune you'd hear when a character earns an extra life. It would be a chorus tune like the Frosted Flakes tune. I think this tune could very well be used in a Sonic commercial. It would be a commercial featuring Super Sonic (Sonic in his golden form). It has lyrics which would be: "This is Super Sonic. He's at the speed of light!"

Here's the Youtube link to it. I also give the Soundcloud link to my tunes later on in case the Youtube links don't work for you. Not only that, but I give links to the music sheets of my tunes because I think it's important that others see my tunes on the sheet:

https://youtu.be/ApxaplL90p0

Now, here's a link to a different tune (the time signature is actually supposed to be 2/2). This tune is supposed to convey something bizarre and mysterious such as being all alone in a far away, distant time period or galaxy. It, to me, conveys powerful, deep meaning and is very catchy. I'm not sure what others would think of it though. I think it could very well be my best tune (along with my Dark Tune since they're both the best tunes). Again, you just hear the beat at first and then you hear the melody along with the beat. So, listen to all of it:

https://youtu.be/LC7Z6g3_RAM

Here's that same tune, but slowed down and added to a scene in Sonic the Hedgehog. The slow version sounds sort of creepy/ominous which is the reason why I've added it to this scene:

https://youtu.be/kX-gC0UZ0Bc

Now, here's a very beautiful, catchy, memorable tune. It sounds like something you'd hear during a wedding. I add lyrics to this. Sure, they might not be great lyrics. But I think the melody itself is great. The lyrics are on the music sheet. I add lyrics to convey what each part of the melody expresses. The fact I know what each part of the melody expresses means I have a vision of this melody, which means I'd know how I'm supposed to fully craft the melody.

As I said before, my melodies aren't fully crafted. I'm going to explain to you now what each part expresses. The first part is a statement where it goes "Bum bum bum this is love. Bum bum bum we are one." The second part builds up in tension since it's about to finish off. It's an incomplete sentence which is: "Don't you see that..."

Then it finishes off with an exclamatory question which would be "You are in my dreams?!" Lastly, this tune starts on a C chord, ends on a C chord, and is in the key of C major. I also reverse this melody and it, to me, conveys something even more beautiful. It conveys a deeper, beautiful meaning. I love the reversed version better than the forward version.

Here's the wedding tune:

https://youtu.be/1bC2ULh65R8

Here's a link to a gentle, caring tune. It's very memorable and catchy. Again, you hear the beat and then the melody along with the beat:

https://youtu.be/8tGyacHCf9w

Here's a cool, catchy tune that conveys deep meaning to me:

https://youtu.be/-mqmNNhMD8s

Here is another dark tune. This one sounds like a catchy, awesome, Halloween tune someone would dance to. This is supposed to be the chorus and this tune is supposed to repeat (although, I just had it play one time). The chorus repeats which is why this tune is supposed to repeat:

https://youtu.be/D5uAckaeBso

Here's a link to a new tune I recently made. I think it's a very good one. It conveys a strong, dramatic emotion and is catchy. It has chords and there's also a pattern to this tune because it alternates between something playing in the treble clef and something playing in the bass clef. Here's the youtube link to this tune:

https://youtu.be/Y5tW_I2hWdE

Here's a link to a short, simple, catchy melody:

https://youtu.be/kbAm07PE9OQ

Here's a link to a bit of a weird tune I made:

https://youtu.be/QYp5Rbj8Ogg

Here's a Super Mario Galaxy 2 tune I made which would convey the scene of Mario obtaining the Grand Green Star. In Super Mario Galaxy 2, Mario collects yellow stars and then he collects the big yellow stars known as the Grand Stars. Later on in the game, you start to collect green stars.

But there is no Grand Green Star in that game. Therefore, I've come up with this theme which expresses Mario obtaining the Grand Green Star which would be a special, secret, hidden star. I first have the melody in basic piano form so that the notes of this melody can be distinctly heard:

https://youtu.be/7O7iNKXliio

From there, I have the Super Mario Galaxy 2 tune with more suitable instruments:

https://youtu.be/lMrm7dDercc

Here's a lovely tune which I think would be a full theme song:

https://youtu.be/duFBsxKpHaE

Here's a beautiful, catchy tune that I think many people would really love:

https://youtu.be/qfuhxB0Dkas

Lastly, here's a tune that's also really good which would be a haunting tune. I haven't chosen the perfectly suitable instruments for this tune. But I think the instrument choice should be good enough. The instrument that would play the melody would be the eerie type of instrument you hear playing in the X-Files theme song.

But I'd prefer a choir instrument to play the melody. It would have to be an eerie choir that conveys the same type of vibe of the eerie instrument in the X-Files theme. Anyway, this melody is catchy, memorable, and great like the rest of my tunes and it conveys profound horror:

https://youtu.be/IfnQ-yKnGIY

Now, here are the soundcloud links to all those tunes I've just presented to you:

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/1listentofirstbestdarktuneversion1accuratelyreproduced

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/2listentosecondbestdarktuneversion2

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/3listentothirdbossfighttune

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/4listentofourthveryhauntingmelodyaccuratelytranscribed

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/1listentofirstnewdramatictune

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/1listentofirstawesometune-1

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/darktunefinal

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/dark-tune-2

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/supersonictune

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/distantfuturefinalversion

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/besttuneweddingtune

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/gentletunefinalversion

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/cooldeepmelody

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/eviltune

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/dramaticforce

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/beautifultune

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/lesson

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/lovelytheme

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/supermariogalaxy1

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/supermariogalaxy2

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/weirdtune

Lastly, here are the links to the music sheets of my tunes so you can see what types of notes and rests I've chosen:

https://ibb.co/56SKbPW

https://ibb.co/PF23qcQ

https://ibb.co/T251smG

https://ibb.co/ZcWL68z

https://ibb.co/d4ENAL

https://ibb.co/d4ENAL

https://ibb.co/F37vyVK

https://ibb.co/my4C7ST

https://ibb.co/qdvySjG

https://ibb.co/3yx9mt9

https://ibb.co/HxL76Xg

https://ibb.co/hoMMBV

https://ibb.co/iMRmRe

https://ibb.co/bsyAkp

https://ibb.co/iuybQp

https://ibb.co/cMKGQp

https://ibb.co/cAW7WU

I'm actually going to point out the music sheet of one of my tunes which would be the Super Mario Galaxy tune. I've circled the pattern of notes I see in that tune which proves I'm not just coming up with melodies with randomly placed notes or, what I like to call, just plain ruckus. What's interesting is that I didn't sit there and think of a pattern of notes. Rather, this melody came to me through pure inspiration alone and, sure enough, I discovered that this inspired melody actually has a pattern of notes to it.

This means my brain can create great, catchy tunes through pure inspiration alone with no intellectualizing before hand. Of course, I do think of certain scenes to be inspired by in order to come up with these melodies. But I do not sit there and think what notes I should use to convey whatever scene, character, or atmosphere I want to convey. I let the inspiration alone create the music. It's no different than how artists say they let the inspiration alone create the work of art. Whenever I feel positively inspired, I let that emotion create the music.

Koji Kondo is the composer for video games such as Super Mario and The Legend of Zelda. Now, this Super Mario Galaxy tune I made is something I think is just as great and catchy as any one of Koji's tunes (but might not sound good or catchy in its current, beginning stage of development). There are certain tunes Koji Kondo makes which are short tunes. An example would be the tune you hear when Mario obtains the Grand Star in Super Mario Galaxy 2. I have created my own tune to express that scene and I think it's just as good as any one of Koji's tunes.

That might sound arrogant of me. But, if I was truly arrogant, then I'd be saying it's a fact that the tunes I'm creating in my mind are just as good as Koji's tunes. I'm not saying it's a fact. I'm merely keeping an open mind to this possibility. I have every reason to keep an open mind to this because, from what it sounds like, this tune really does sound just as good and catchy as one of Koji's tunes. I have suspended all factors that would make an inflated judgment and I've honestly judged this tune to be just as good and catchy as one of his tunes.

If someone else made this tune and fully crafted it, then I'd see it as being just as good as Koji's tunes. Whether this is just a crap tune and it's simply my lack of knowledge and experience rendering me unable to tell the difference between a crap tune from a really good one has yet to be determined. Like I said before, only time will tell and it's only when I successfully convey/fully develop this tune would it be determined for sure if this tune really is as good as I say it is or not. I will say one last thing before I move onto the Q&A Section.

It takes a gifted composer to convey something great, catchy, profound, memorable, and powerful in one simple melody. I think I have that gift, but have to find a way to convey it. If there's any skilled composer out there who can convey my melodies, then I'd tell them to feel free to convey them. I'll show them the music sheets to my tunes and they can get to work. But, if it's really the case that only I can convey these melodies since I know what they are, then I'll have to forget about others conveying my melodies for me.

Q&A Section

Other Person's Response: You've got to be joking!

My Reply: I'm not joking. I really think the tunes I'm hearing in my mind are really good and that I have yet to find a way to convey them. I have every reason to think I'm creating really good tunes in my head.

Other Person's Response: It seems you're just bragging about yourself. You think you have some awesome tunes in your head to share to the world and you don't.

My Reply: I'm claiming everyone's brain is naturally capable of creating great works of art in their heads. I explain why this is later on. So, I'm not just bragging about myself here. Also, I'm open-minded towards the possibility that I'm creating rubbish music in my mind that I just think is great and expresses the scenes I described. I'm also open-minded towards the possibility that the music I'm creating in my head is great and really does express the scenes I described. So, consider everything I've written to be a claim I'm open-minded to. Don't consider it to be the written material of a bragging narcissist.

Other Person's Response: Do you proselytize the things you've written?

My Reply: Yes. I share some of the things I've written on online forums. People are doubtful about my claims, and I wish to clear things up for these people in the hopes they will agree with me.

Other Person's Response: According to your philosophy, which you've written about in your previous packets, the only thing that would make your music great is if people felt positive emotions from it.

My Reply: That's correct. But, I go outside my own personal definition of beauty and greatness when I talk about my music being great or beautiful. It's just for the sake of convenience.

Other Person's Response: Is it the instrument choice you've made for your melodies that makes you think your melodies convey powerful scenes? There's more to music than having instruments. The melodies themselves must convey certain scenes.

My Reply: It's not the instrument choice. I really think my melodies convey powerful and profound scenes. An example would be my Haunting Tune because I think the melody conveys powerful and profound horror, regardless of what instrument I had playing the melody. Other people have yet to realize the power and greatness this melody has. Like I said, only I can see its power and greatness. Every time I listen to my melodies, they always convey the exact same, powerful scenes to me.

Other Person's Response: I think you're talking nonsense. Even if you did accurately transcribe the melodies you've naturally created in your mind, there'd be no power and greatness whatsoever to these melodies that has yet to be conveyed to the audience. There's no way to make these melodies work because they'll always be senseless rubbish, regardless of what you try to do with them!

My Reply: I'm hoping there is a way to somehow make them work, I just don't agree that they would be senseless rubbish, and I think there's power and greatness to these melodies that has yet to be conveyed to the audience. Perhaps a music teacher or a composing professional can make them work. In other words, maybe they can find a way to convey the power and greatness of my accurately transcribed melodies for other listeners. If not, then I'd have to find a way to convey their power and greatness myself.

Other Person's Response: Personally, I don't think you're coming up with any good melodies in your mind. What good ideas are you able to come up with though?

My Reply: They'd be simple ideas, such as video game or movie titles. For example, I came up with the title "Star Trek Dimensions." There are Star Trek movies out there titled "Star Trek Beyond" and "Star Trek Discovery." I came up with the next title called "Star Trek Dimensions." After all, there was a Sonic the Hedgehog game to be released called "Sonic Dimensions." But, that game didn't get released.

So, I thought that "Dimensions" would go well with a new Star Trek title. Especially since Star Trek involves the cosmos, other dimensions, etc. I also came up with 2 Super Mario titles, which would be "Super Mario Palace" and "Super Mario Casino." I also come up with simple, comedy scenes (such as Family Guy scenes).

Since my knowledge and experience is so limited, I'm limited to coming up with simple ideas, rather than complicated ideas that require a rich level of knowledge and experience, such as good stories for movies or new, awesome inventions that work.

Even my own vocabulary is limited, which means it would be difficult for me to come up with a very amazing movie or video game title. But, even though my ideas are simple, I still think they're good ideas worth appreciating.

Other Person's Response: Could you share another one of these good ideas you have?

My Reply: Sure. There's an anime titled "Inuyasha." The word "inu" is the Japanese word for "dog," and the word "yasha" is the Japanese word for "demon." The main character in the anime is Inuyasha himself who's a dog demon. My idea would be a new series of Inuyasha titled "Inutenshi." The word "tenshi" is the Japanese word for "angel." So, the character Inuyasha would be a dog angel in this new series, rather than a dog demon.

Thus, Inuyasha's new name would be Inutenshi. Many Inuyasha fan girls have found the character Inuyasha very attractive. But, they might find the character Inutenshi much more attractive. Whether this idea of mine is a good idea that would actually work is something I don't know. It's just a random idea I'm throwing out there. Hopefully, it's a good idea that would work.

Other Person's Response: You say you're naturally coming up with awesome, amazing tunes in your head. So, why couldn't you naturally come up with amazing titles or new, amazing inventions?

My Reply: It's because my brain hasn't naturally learned the things necessary to come up with these amazing titles and inventions. For example, I never immersed my mind in stories or literature filled with rich vocabulary. Had I done this throughout my life, my brain would've naturally learned the rich vocabulary I'd need to come up with amazing movie or video game titles.

Actually, I'd need to figure out what these big words mean if I were to read them in stories or literature throughout my life. Then I'd have the vocabulary I need to come up with great titles. But, since I've listened to music my whole life, whether it be through playing video games, watching movies, or listening to music on the radio while driving, my brain has naturally learned the rules of music theory. Thus, I'm able to naturally come up with awesome music in my mind.

Other Person's Response: I heard you're no good at tasks that require thought, planning, and a rich level of knowledge and experience. That's why you fail when it comes to things such as skeptical and rational thinking. You have a difficult time trying to discover the truth as to whether conspiracy theories are true or not, whether vaccines are harmful or not, or whether the afterlife exists or not.

You can't decide what's true and you give up since you're not skilled at this. You have no interest in this anyway, which is another reason why you give up on it. Creating great music is also something that requires knowledge, experience, thought, and planning. So, it's no wonder you're not creating any good, sensible melodies!

My Reply: But, I am skilled at certain tasks that don't require much thought at all, such as playing video games. When I play Super Mario, I just enjoy collecting items and completing the levels. I don't think about anything and I just have fun. I'm not the best player in the world, but I did have people compliment me on my level of skill.

But, even though I'm currently not a skilled composer who's making music other people love to listen to, music means so much to me, which is why I'm not giving up on composing just yet. I've put my video gaming hobby on hold in the hopes that I can become a skilled composer someday. If I can't, then I'm giving up composing and going back to playing video games. So, composing is the new hobby I've recently taken up, and I'm no longer playing video games.

Other Person's Response: You say you can't decide what's true. Does that mean you're also undecided as to whether you're making awesome melodies in your head?

My Reply: Correct. It's possible I'm just creating senseless, rubbish melodies in my mind. Then again, I could be making awesome and powerful melodies in my mind.

Other Person's Response: Are you deaf? There are deaf composers out there.

My Reply: I'm not deaf. My hearing is just fine. I'm also not blind either and my sight is just fine.

Other Person's Response: Are you tone deaf?

My Reply: No. I can hear the difference between tones and semitones.

Other Person's Response: All those tunes you've posted up there are utter ****! Can't you make a better tune?

My Reply: There is this one tune I've recently made that you'll hopefully like. It's one of those naturally inspired tunes where I just create whatever melodies come to mind. In this packet, I claim people can naturally create good music in their heads, having no knowledge and experience whatsoever in composing. I think I'm naturally creating good music from within and, when you look at this recent melody I've made on the music sheet, you'll definitely see a pattern. This is the melody my mind has naturally created for me and, as it turns out, there is an actual pattern with the notes.

So, clearly, my mind is naturally creating a pattern of notes without even thinking. If my mind can do that, then why couldn't it naturally create good music? Anyway, in regards to this recent melody of mine, it's supposed to be a strange melody. It conveys a weird scene. Not something big and epic such as a strange scene in a horror movie. But, something like a mouse doing something strange (i.e. a more trivial scene). I think it's a good, catchy melody. But, it's not an amazing, powerful melody. When you listen to it, you first hear the beat, and then, the melody along with the beat. So, here are the links to it:

Youtube Link:

https://youtu.be/yWm9Z6XULpM

Soundcloud Link:

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/strangemelody

Music Sheet (I circle the pattern of notes I see):

https://ibb.co/LvQdFqx

Other Person's Response: Why are you just sharing short tunes? Why not share to us full songs?

My Reply: Well, if the tunes I make are awful and people aren't liking them, then it's a waste of time and effort to make a full song because the full song might be just as awful. If my tunes are rubbish, then my songs might be rubbish. So, I'm just sharing my tunes for now and seeing how people respond to them.

Other Person's Response: I'd like to hear another new tune. This time, make it an awesome one, because I don't like hearing **** music!

My Reply: This new tune I've made, to me, conveys a scene that's heavy, dark, and ominous. I think it's like one of those awesome, ominous tunes you hear in video games. Again, this is just a short tune (a short example) I'm sharing for now. I'm not sharing full themes or songs yet. Every time I listen to this tune, it conveys that ominous vibe to me. That's an emotional memory my mind has in regards to this tune. If I lose that memory, then I'd perhaps hear this tune as meaningless rubbish.

It would be like listening to a child pluck out a random tune on an instrument. That's why I must have that memory intact so I know the ominous power that I'm supposed to eventually convey to the audience. Without that memory, then the tune just becomes a scrap tune from my perspective. It becomes stripped of that awesome, ominous power. So, by having this emotional memory intact, I retain knowledge of the great, ominous power this tune really has.

Only I have this memory. Since others don't have this memory, then they'll hear the tune as meaningless rubbish when they listen to it. But, I'm the musical artist here creating great tunes and people just don't realize they're great yet. They hear them as meaningless rubbish for now. But, I have to find a way to bring out the greatness of my tunes so that the audience realizes the power and greatness they really have. Anyway, here's this new tune. Hopefully, there will be people who'll hear this tune as awesome and ominous:

Youtube Link:

https://youtu.be/k5WX4AOk8v0

Soundcloud Link:

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/newdarktune

Music Sheet:

https://ibb.co/nb5KH3k

Other Person's Response: How would you lose that emotional memory?

My Reply: If it's a short term memory, then my brain would lose it. But, if it becomes a long term memory, my brain retains the memory. These emotional memories I have in regards to all my tunes were once short term memories. That means I lost them and heard my tunes as meaningless rubbish when I listened to them. Fortunately, they're now long term memories since I've managed to bring those short term memories back. By focusing very hard when listening to my tunes, I've managed to bring back those memories I've lost. So, the only thing that can take away these long term memories would be something such as brain damage or Alzheimer's disease.

Other Person's Response: These memories are probably nothing more than you thinking your tunes are great and convey certain awesome scenes when they're really rubbish tunes. I think you were hearing your tunes for what they really were when you lost those memories. You heard them as meaningless rubbish and that's what they'll always be. There is no power and greatness whatsoever to these tunes that has yet to be conveyed to the audience.

My Reply: I don't agree. It seems absolutely compelling to me that these tunes are great and convey the scenes I describe. I just have to find a way to bring out that power and greatness to other listeners.

Other Person's Response: The brain works by a process known as conditioning. When you have a certain inspiration (such as the inspiration to create a dark, awesome tune in your head), that inspiration gets combined (conditioned) with whatever tune you create. In other words, your brain confuses the inspiration with the tune itself and thinks they're the same thing. Therefore, your brain thinks the tune you made actually has that dark, awesome power you've been inspired by when it's really just a rubbish tune that expresses no given scene. Basically, your mind is just playing tricks on you. It's making you see power and greatness that's not even there.

My Reply: I'm not sure if this is true.

Other Person's Response: Maybe the real melodies you have in your mind are awesome and catchy. You have memories of those melodies in your mind. But, you might be inaccurately transcribing those melodies. So, when you lose those memories and listen to your inaccurately transcribed melodies, they sound like meaningless rubbish since that's what they are. From there, you try to bring back those memories by listening to these melodies.

You're trying to remember what the real, awesome, catchy melodies were by listening to the inaccurately transcribed melodies, and you manage to do so. So, when you listen to those inaccurately transcribed melodies again, having brought back those memories, you hear them as the awesome, catchy ones in your mind, even though the melodies in your mind and the transcribed ones don't match up.

My Reply: Yes, that might be what's going on here. But, maybe, if I were to accurately transcribe the melodies in my mind, I would automatically hear them as awesome and catchy, even when I don't have those memories. Other people might hear them as awesome and catchy as well. I thought I was accurately transcribing the melodies in my mind. But, I might not be. After all, I'm not very skilled at transcribing what I have in my mind, whether it be drawings, or melodies.

Other Person's Response: You say there's power and greatness lurking in the shadows that you have to convey to the audience. Perhaps you're just thinking there's a ghost in the shadows and it's your imagination playing tricks on you. Maybe there was no power and greatness ever there.

My Reply: I really don't know. To me, it really seems like it's there.

Other Person's Response: When you lose those emotional memories and hear your tunes as meaningless rubbish, is that the same thing as saying you hear them as noise and nothing more?

My Reply: Yes. The tunes just become sound. They convey no scene, moment, or character.

Other Person's Response: If you do lose those memories, couldn't you just read the described scenes of your tunes and that be enough to bring those memories back when you listen to those tunes? Shouldn't that remind you and allow you to hear your tunes as great, awesome, and powerful again?

My Reply: No. That's because it's not the type of memory where someone forgets something he's written and just has to go back and read it again to remind himself. What I'm talking about here is an emotional memory. So, even if I did read the described scenes of my tunes while listening to them, I'd still hear them as meaningless rubbish. It's only me having those emotional memories intact that allows me to hear my tunes as awesome, powerful, great, and conveying of certain scenes. So, reading the awesome or powerful scenes I described for my tunes isn't enough for me to actually hear my tunes as expressing those scenes.

Other Person's Response: What's your update or status now?

My Reply: I've had an emotional trauma and I'm all better now. My mind was stuck on some traumatizing worry for quite some time and that rendered me without my feelings of happiness and joy. I was in a very horrible, unhealthy state of mind, my life and hobbies were nothing beautiful, or worth living for. Now that I'm all better, I wish to go back to composing. I've abandoned it for quite some time due to my miserable struggles and, now, I'm ready to go back to it.

My goal in making music is to create melodies, themes, and songs other people would love to listen to. I don't want to be making music I just think is great. I wish to express myself as an artist which means I want to make music that is both great and expresses whatever it is I wish to express. So far, I know I'm not making any good music for others because so many people online have told me my music is rubbish and doesn't express anything I described.

However, it could be the case my melodies are great, do express what I describe, and other people don't realize this yet since my music is only in its beginning stage of development. I'm also undecided as to whether I'm creating great music in my head and I'm just bad at conveying it. Or, if my mentally inspired music really is bad.

I consider the possibility that my music is great and others don't realize this yet. It seems absolutely compelling to me that the music I hear in my head is great and expresses what I describe. Anyway, I hope I'm able to create the awesome music I want to create in the real, physical world. This is a goal I wish to achieve and I don't think I'm going to have anymore miserable moments stopping me from achieving this goal.

Other Person's Response: When you talk about fully crafting your melodies to convey their power and greatness, do you mean adding in all the proper chords, harmony, etc.?

My Reply: Yes.

Other Person's Response: If your melodies become fully crafted and a few people do say your melodies are great and express the scenes you described, is that enough to convince you that your melodies are great and express the scenes you described?

My Reply: No. I must share my fully crafted melodies to many people. Especially professional musicians and composers. I can't trust the personal views of a few people. If many people end up saying to me the same thing as those few people did in regards to my fully crafted melodies, then I'd be convinced my melodies are great and express the scenes I described.

Other Person's Response: Even if your melodies do become successfully conveyed (i.e. fully crafted), they're too simplistic, predictable, and repetitive to be anything good.

My Reply: I think they'd still be great. Their power and greatness should still be there. A craft doesn't have to be complex in order for it to be powerful, profound, awesome, or great.

Other Person's Response: I agree that short, simple tunes can be great and memorable. The McDonald's I'm Lovin' It tune is very short. I think the melody only has 5 notes. Yet, so many people like it.

My Reply: Yes. It's a huge misconception to assume that short, simple melodies, that only have a few notes, won't be good tunes. If you choose the right notes and rests for a short melody, it can be a great, catchy, memorable melody. I think the melodies in my head do have that choice of notes and rests that make them great, catchy, and memorable. Some of my melodies convey powerful, profound meaning and emotion.

Other Person's Response: Here's the youtube link to the McDonald's I'm Lovin' It tune:

https://youtu.be/GApPXZAvkRI

My Reply: Thank you.

Other Person's Response: What if some people don't like those short, memorable tunes (such as the McDonald's tune)?

My Reply: I think they would be great tunes and these people would be having an unreasonably high standard which prevents them from appreciating the greatness of these tunes.

Other Person's Response: Any given work of art simply might not be the style of art he/she would prefer. So, having too high of a standard isn't the only thing that prevents people from loving and admiring certain works of art.

My Reply: Correct.

Other Person's Response: Could you give me another example of one of those short, great, memorable tunes?

My Reply: Yes. If you've ever heard the short tune that goes something like: "Tyler, Tyler, he's our man! If he can't do it, nobody can!," then that would be another example. Again, I think I'm naturally creating great, memorable tunes like this in my head.

Other Person's Response: A theme song or melody can be great, but not memorable. For example, the generic, cinematic music you hear during movie trailers is great music, created by a talented composer. But, it's not memorable music because many people might find it to be the same old, generic music you hear during movie trailers. The Harry Potter theme song, on the other hand, is not generic music. That's why the Harry Potter theme is so memorable. The same idea applies to the song "A Whole New World" that's heard during the Aladdin trailer. That's a very memorable song, and I think it's much better than generic, movie trailer music.

My Reply: I agree. If you want to create music that really captures the soul of certain movies or trailers, then not only does the music need to be great, but it needs to be memorable. I heard there's a Sonic the Hedgehog movie coming out, and that Jim Carrey plays as the villain Dr. Robotnick. Imagine if this Sonic movie just had generic, cinematic music in it. It would be a bit boring compared to having the actual, memorable, Sonic theme songs in it. Those Sonic theme songs really capture the very soul or essence of the Sonic universe, and that's why it would be a much better choice to have them in the movie.

The same idea applies to the characters themselves. If the characters had generic, cinematic personalities, then that would be dull and boring compared to having the actual, memorable, personalities the classical characters have. If, for example, you take away Sonic's original personality, then you make him a dull, boring, cinematic character if you just gave him a generic personality that's seen all the time in movies (i.e. if you gave him a serious, determined personality that dulls the classical, youthful, energetic personality of Sonic that appeals to so many Sonic the Hedgehog fans). So, by having generic, cinematic music, characters, stories, etc., that makes movies less appealing.

Other Person's Response: Do you think you're naturally creating music in your mind that's not only great, but memorable?

My Reply: Yes.

Other Person's Response: In regards to those short, memorable tunes (such as the McDonald's I'm Lovin' It tune), maybe the melody itself of these tunes wasn't enough to convey anything great or memorable. So, perhaps something more was needed to go along with these melodies to convey something great and memorable when people listened to them.

My Reply: I think you're right. The same idea would apply to my melodies. But, some melodies, even when they're great and memorable, require the context of an entire song to convey their power and greatness to the audience. But, some melodies (like the McDonald's I'm Lovin' It tune) don't require the context of an entire song. They just need more things to go along with the melody to convey their greatness.

Other Person's Response: I know there was this one guy who sang a song he created during an American Idol audition. It's famous and it's called "Pants on the Ground." Maybe he wasn't just singing the melody line. Maybe he was singing more things to go along with that melody line in order to convey something great, meaningful, and catchy to the audience. Here's the youtube link to it:

https://youtu.be/tMwhl4IrPNc

My Reply: Well, for one, he did sing an entire song and not just a short melody. So, maybe, if I make my melodies into entire songs, they will become great, memorable, and catchy. Of course, they're not going to become famous. Few people and their works become famous. But, as long as I get some praise and recognition of my music, that'll be good and acceptable. I could share my awesome music to other people online, get praise and recognition of it, and that would be good enough.

Other Person's Response: What if you do make entire songs in your head that you think are awesome, you accurately reproduce (transcribe) those songs, and people still tell you they sound like rubbish, plucked out by a baby?

My Reply: Then there must be something missing to convey the power, greatness, and memorable quality of my songs to the audience that I have to figure out. Or, maybe, I really would be creating rubbish.

Other Person's Response: If a melody expresses powerful or profound emotion, then is that enough, in your eyes, to make a melody great?

My Reply: Yes. Even if the melody is simple and not complicated, as long as it's a catchy, memorable, powerful, or profound melody, then that makes the melody great. So, the McDonald's I'm Lovin' It tune would be great since it's catchy and so many people love it.

Other Person's Response: Is there any way to prove that the music you're hearing in your head is great and you're just bad at reproducing it?

My Reply: Actually, I tried to reproduce a famous nursery rhyme, not knowing the actual notes to it. I shared my attempt at replicating it, and people told me it was awful. We all know those nursery rhymes are great and memorable. So, it must really be the case that I'm just bad at replicating what I hear in my head. It's quite possible that my own mentally inspired tunes are great, awesome, or powerful, and I'm just bad at reproducing these tunes I hear in my head.

It would be like if someone created an awesome drawing in his head and was bad at drawing it. That person just needs training and education to become a skilled drawer. Likewise, I need training and education to reproduce the awesome music I'm creating in my head. So, when I say in this packet that my melodies will become great once they're fully crafted, I'm referring to the ones in my mind, accurately reproduced.

I'm not sure if having an accurately reproduced melody is enough to convey its greatness and memorable quality. You might need more things to go along with it such as the proper chords, harmony, etc. Only then would people hear something meaningful, catchy, and great. That even applies to famous nursery rhymes. Sure, the lyrics of these famous nursery rhymes are good and memorable. But, I'm just talking about the nursery rhymes themselves. You might need more things to convey their greatness because the melody itself might not be enough.

Other Person's Response: When you compared your attempt at reproducing a nursery rhyme to the actual nursery rhyme itself, did you get the notes wrong?

My Reply: Yes, I did. When I looked at the music sheet of this nursery rhyme and compared the actual notes to the notes I attempted to replicate, I got the notes wrong.

Other Person's Response: Why is it so difficult for you to reproduce the tunes you hear in your head?

My Reply: It's because, not only does it require practice to become skilled at that, but also because these tunes in my head are sometimes just general ideas. That means, for example, I might not be specifically hearing a G or an Ab. Rather, I'm just getting the general idea that the note could be a G or an Ab. But, many of the notes I hear in my head are specific, and I might not accurately reproduce some of them.

Other Person's Response: In order to accurately transcribe the melodies you hear in your head, I think that requires ear training.

My Reply: Yes.

Other Person's Response: If you created a tune in your head and didn't accurately reproduce it, then how would you bring back the emotional memory you lost in regards to the real tune in your head? You don't have the notes exactly like the real tune you've created in your head. If the real tune was something truly great, then you wouldn't be having the real tune on your computer since it wasn't the accurately reproduced tune. I'm just curious as to how you could see the reproduced tune as great when it was the real tune in your head that was great.

My Reply: The reproduced tune would be similar to the real one in my head. That's enough for me to bring back the memory of greatness I had in regards to real tune in my head. It's also possible that I did accurately reproduce some of the tunes I've created in my head. That would allow me to bring back the emotional memory much quicker since it would take my brain less time to remember than having a tune that's not accurately reproduced.

Other Person's Response: You talk about how our brains are naturally capable of creating great music in our heads. I agree with this. So, I agree that you're naturally creating great music in your head and that you're just bad at reproducing it. Since we can naturally create good rhythms in our heads, then we should be able to naturally create good melodies and themes in our heads.

My Reply: Yes. I talk more about this later on. There's an article I share which talks about this.

Other Person's Response: If you want to start making good music in the real, physical world, then acquire all the knowledge, training, and experience you need.

My Reply: Sure. It's important others realize that my whole goal in making music is to create music that is both great and expresses whatever it is I wish to express. Even if I did, eventually, write a good melody or theme, said melody or theme might not express what I intended to express. I could be making a choice of notes and rests for my melodies and themes that I think expresses what I want to express when, in reality, it doesn't. Say, for instance, I wanted to create a melody that expresses someone showing kindness.

From my perspective, the notes and rests I've chosen for this melody would express that. But, if everyone else listened to it, it might not express that at all. This means I'd know how to create good music. But, I wouldn't know how to express myself as a composer. Sure, I could create lyrics that express what I want to express. But, the melodies and themes I write wouldn't express that. It would be like this. Imagine if a famous nursery rhyme still had the same lyrics, but a completely different melody that didn't express the intended scene or message.

Other Person's Response: So, you're saying, even if you do learn how to create good melodies, you might not know how to express what you want to express through melody writing? You might not know how to communicate what you want to communicate to the audience through melody writing?

My Reply: That's what I'm saying. Hopefully, that won't be the case. Many good composers are able to express what they want to express to the audience through the music they write. Not just in terms of lyrics, but also through the melodies they write. That's why you see so many people saying that a particular song, melody, or theme expresses something specific. They could say a particular melody expresses adventure or collecting a secret item. That's my goal is to express myself to the audience through songs, melodies, and themes.

Other Person's Response: You can write good music. It doesn't have to express what you want to express.

My Reply: I'm not just going to write good music. It has to express what I want to express. Otherwise, I'm giving up composing.

Other Person's Response: Then why not just stick with creating lyrics?

My Reply: Even though I might need lyrics to inspire a melody or theme, I'm not concerned about creating lyrics. I just want to create great melodies, songs, and themes that express what I want to express.

Other Person's Response: I heard you have autism and that you lack empathy. So, maybe that makes it difficult for you to emotionally relate to your audience. This means you might create fully crafted melodies and themes later on that you think expresses the given scene or atmosphere you want to express when it really doesn't.

My Reply: I hope that's not the case because I wouldn't be expressing what I want to express to the audience.

Other Person's Response: I'm quite sure autistic people and, even people lacking empathy, produced great music that expresses what they wanted to express.

My Reply: That could be.

Other Person's Response: Since you're able to write things that express what you want to express to the audience, then I see no reason why you shouldn't be able to write melodies, themes, and songs that express what you want to express to the audience. You just need to become a skilled composer is all. Right now, you're a skilled writer. That's why you can articulate things quite well to readers. But, I'd love to see you become a skilled composer and make some awesome music for others to listen to!

My Reply: Thank you.

Other Person's Response: I realize you're relying on your instincts/inspiration alone to create, what you think is, great music in your head that expresses what you want to express. Since you have no knowledge of how music works, you basically rely on your instincts. I'm sorry, but you won't create any good music in your head this way. As a matter of fact, it won't express anything you want to express to the audience. That's why you must educate and train yourself in the art of composing to know how to create good music.

My Reply: I soon explain why I think our instincts alone can allow us to create great music in our minds that expresses the things we wish to express. It's basically a matter of creating music from within without educating yourself, and I think this method works to naturally create powerful and awesome music in our minds. However, if I'm wrong and you were right, then I'm just not sure at this point how to create music that expresses whatever scene or character I wish to express.

I might be able to create good music by studying the rules of music theory. But, I'd be unable to create melodies, themes, and songs that bring out the inner emotions I wish to express. I could make a good melody, theme, or song anyway. But, it just wouldn't bring out those inner feelings. Even if I did create a melody or theme that I thought expressed the inner emotion I wanted to express (i.e. the given scene, atmosphere, or character), it might not express that at all to the audience, as I mentioned earlier.

Other Person's Response: You expect to naturally come up with awesome music in your head through pure emotional inspiration alone. Creating awesome music is a combination of inspiration and intellect. You need to also think about the rules of music theory. You can't just jump right in there and start creating awesome music to share to the world. I realize you're not the intellectual type of person, you really don't want to research things, and you just want to unleash your emotions through music right here and now. But, you can't create any awesome music if you're just blindly relying on your emotions without taking the time to learn things.

My Reply: I am willing to learn the things I need to learn. However, I think our brains are naturally capable of creating great works of art in our minds and I soon explain why that is. I think creating awesome music in our minds naturally comes from within. It can come through sheer emotional inspiration alone. You don't need to think about anything and you can let the inspiration alone create the awesome music in your head.

It's no different than how artists say they let the inspiration alone create the work of art. Emotions are power, force, and energy. They, alone, can be the driving force for creating some powerful and awesome music in our minds. Like I said though, only in our minds. This means some education and training is necessary to convey the awesome music you've created in your head.

Other Person's Response: If you blabber something without even thinking, then it won't make any sense. Likewise, if you create music in your head without thinking, then it will be musical gibberish. The melodies you create just won't make any musical sense. That's why your tunes are so awful. There are also other reasons why they're awful. People who rely on emotions alone won't get very far in life.

Some thought, planning, and analysis is necessary if you want to create a good work of art that makes sense to others. That even applies to creating good works of art in your head. I realize you're intellectually slow, lazy, and you're no good at thinking, planning, and analysis. That's another reason why you rely on your instincts alone to create music in your head. But, that thought, planning, and analysis really is necessary.

My Reply: If that's the case, then I'd have to use another method to create good music that expresses what I want to express. Sadly, I'm not sure if I can achieve the goal of expressing what I want to express through music since I just might be incapable of this. Again, I might be able to write some good music if I learn how to do it. But, I'd be clueless on how to express what I want to express. As a result, I'd find myself throwing my hands up in the air and giving up composing. Maybe I can express what I want to express if a music teacher or some online source helps me out. In that case, I won't give up composing.

Other Person's Response: You'd actually be thinking about something when creating those tunes in your head. You'd be thinking about the scenes, ideas, or lyrics to be inspired by. But, more thought than that is needed if you want to create good music in your head.

My Reply: I think that's all the thought that's needed. From there, you just let the inspiration do the work in creating awesome music in your head.

Other Person's Response: Perhaps you really do have some awesome music in your head that expresses what you want to express. You said you might not have accurately reproduced these tunes. So, maybe, you just need to slightly change the notes of those reproduced tunes so they adhere to the rules of melody and rhythm writing. Perhaps then they'd become those awesome tunes you hear in your head.

My Reply: That could be.

Other Person's Response: If you created a melody in your head, accurately reproduced it, but the notes of the reproduced melody had to be changed to make a completely different melody than the rubbish, nonsensical one you heard in your head in order to adhere to the rules of melody writing, would you be alright with this new melody?

My Reply: No. If it's a completely different melody than the one I heard in my head, then it would be a melody that doesn't express what I want to express. But, the one I heard in my head wouldn't express anything anyway since it would just be a rubbish melody that makes no sense, musically speaking. If the melodies I'm creating in my head are rubbish since they don't adhere to the rules, then I'd have to use another method to create melodies that express what I want to express.

Other Person's Response: Remember, when composing melodies, you can't just compose whatever melody you're inspired to compose. That's how babies compose. It's the reason why the melodies created by babies sound awful. So, forget about using your inspiration/instincts alone to create melodies. You must use another method that actually works.

My Reply: I won't know how to express what I want to express to the audience using any other method. This is the only method I have. I hope my method works, my naturally inspired melodies are great and do express the scenes I describe, and I just have to find a way to bring out said power and greatness for other listeners.

Other Person's Response: If you later come to realize that your method fails and your melodies really are like those created by babies, what are you going to do?

My Reply: It might be a dead end for me as a composing artist. If I can't find a way to create music that expresses what I want to express to the audience, then I'd give up composing.

Other Person's Response: You're thinking that your method actually works though. But, what makes you think you're any different than a baby, coming up with rubbish melodies in his head? Why do you think you're special?

My Reply: I talk later on about how our brains naturally learn how to create great music in our heads. It's called statistical learning. Babies haven't naturally learned how to create great music in their heads yet. Since I'm an adult, then I should be able to naturally create great music in my head that expresses what I wish to express to the audience. But, I'm open-minded towards the possibility that my method doesn't work. In which case, I really won't know how to create the music I want to create.

Other Person's Response: You say that, even if you do become a skilled composer who writes good melodies, you might not know how to create melodies that express what you want to express to the audience. That's like saying a skilled author might not know what words to choose that expresses what he wants to express to the audience. It's also like saying a skilled painter might not know what to paint that expresses what he wants to express to the audience. My point is, if you're a skilled artist, you'll instinctively know how to artistically express what you wish to express to the audience. It doesn't matter if you're a writer, a painter, a composer, or any other type of artist.

My Reply: I don't think it's like that. When it comes to melody writing, that's a different story. I'd have that writer's instinct and the painter's instinct. That means, if I was a skilled writer and painter, I'd know what to write and paint that expresses what I want to express to the audience. But, I might not have the composer's instinct. I'm really getting the idea that melody writing is something special and different from all other fields of art.

So, if I was working in any other field of art, I'd know how to express what I want to express to the audience. But, to express what you want to express to the audience through melody writing, that's something special and requires some greater ability. I might not have that ability. That means, even if I was a skilled composer who wrote good music, I might not have the ability to express what I want to express to the audience.

Other Person's Response: Yes, you do need to follow certain rules when writing a melody. But, you're the artist and you choose whatever notes and rests express what you wish to express to the audience. All you need is creativity as an artist. Once you have that and, once you follow the rules of melody writing, you're all set to create melodies.

My Reply: If my method of naturally creating melodies in my mind really doesn't work and my mentally inspired melodies are rubbish, then I'd have to use another method to create melodies, like I said before. So, using another method, I could certainly choose whatever notes and rests I want, as long as they adhere to the rules of melody writing. But, these created melodies just wouldn't express what I want to express to the audience.

I'd really be clueless on how to create a melody that expresses what I want to express to the audience. I don't think it's a lack of creativity because I am already a creative individual. I come up with many new ideas. So, perhaps something else would be hindering me from achieving my goal of creating melodies that express what I want to express to the audience.

Other Person's Response: Could you give me a good summary and conclusion of the new things you have to say in this packet, in addition to the summary you've given that goes along with your tunes and music sheets?

My Reply:

Summary
1.) I think I'm naturally creating awesome melodies in my mind that express the things I wish to express to the audience. I think I have accurately transcribed some of these melodies. An example would be my best dark tune.

However, having these accurately transcribed melodies isn't enough to convey their power, greatness, and meaning to the audience. Something more would be necessary. Or, maybe, I never was creating any good or awesome melodies that express the things I wanted to express in the first place. In which case, proceed to #2 and #3 below.

2.) If my natural instincts/inspiration alone does not allow me to create good or awesome melodies that express what I want to express, then I'd have to use another method.

3.) Using another method, I could certainly create good or awesome melodies once I learn how to do that. But, I might not have the ability to create melodies that express what I want to express. Some people would say I just don't have the talent or creativity necessary to create melodies that express the scenes, moments, and characters I wish to express.

But, perhaps something else would be hindering me from achieving this goal. I think it would be difficult for me to create such melodies simply because I'd have to actually take into consideration the rules of music theory when creating melodies, rather than creating melodies through inspiration alone. I'd instead have to limit myself to the rules I'd have to study when creating melodies.

I would, thus, be limited in terms of my ability to express any scene, moment, or character I wish to express through melody writing. Being restricted by these rules would make this goal very difficult for me to achieve. I'm not sure if I can even accomplish this. Also, take note that, even though I may need lyrics to inspire a melody, I'm not concerned about lyrics. I just want to create awesome melodies, themes, and songs that express what I want to express.

Conclusion
If our brains aren't naturally capable of following the rules of music theory to create awesome and powerful melodies, themes, and songs in our minds that express whatever we wish to express, then I'd have to actually study and follow the rules myself to create the music I want to create.

I thought our brains had this natural capability (as I explained in the summary packet of my composing dream). As a matter of fact, I thought our brains had the natural capability to follow other artistic rules to naturally create other great and powerful works of art in our minds, such as the beings and landscapes witnessed during drug trips.

But, I could be wrong. Maybe I'm only creating rubbish music in my mind that's really no different than melodies plucked out by a baby. In which case, I can only hope that I can create awesome and powerful music that expresses what I wish to express through training and education.

Other Person's Response: You say that you're naturally capable of creating awesome music in your mind that expresses the things you wish to express. You say this is simple and easy for you because your brain naturally follows the rules of music theory in creating such music. You just let the inspiration alone do the work and you don't have to think about anything. But, if you're wrong and you're only creating senseless, rubbish tunes in your head, then you're saying it would be difficult for you because, now, you can no longer rely on your natural instincts alone to create music. You'd instead have to think about the rules when creating your melodies and plan things out.

My Reply: Yes. It would be very simple and easy if I could just create awesome music that expresses what I want to express through inspiration alone without doing any thinking or planning. When creating music becomes an intellectual exercise, that's when it becomes difficult for me. If I have to create music using method #2 rather than method #1 (my natural instincts alone), then I'd no longer have the freedom of expression that my natural instincts alone gave me. Instead, I'd have to restrict myself to certain keys on the keyboard when creating melodies so that said melodies would follow the rules of music theory. That's what would make it difficult for me to create music that expresses what I want to express.

Other Person's Response: I think our brains are naturally capable of following some rules of music theory, such as rhythm. But, I don't think our brains are naturally capable of following other rules when making music, such as proper melody writing. In other words, a complete novice can naturally create a melody in his mind that has a rhythm. But, it wouldn't be a good, sensible melody since it doesn't follow the rules of melody writing.

I'm sorry to say it, but I think you're only creating melodies in your mind that are senseless rubbish. It doesn't matter how much power, inspiration, and emotion you put into it because you'll always come up with rubbish melodies in your mind. Inspiration alone does not make a good work of art. You must, therefore, study and follow the rules if you wish to create some truly awesome music. The same idea applies to that complete novice because he won't be able to create any good melodies in his mind without the necessary education and training.

My Reply: I thought our brains had the natural capability to follow all the rules of music theory. That would make matters simple and easy if that were the case because I could just naturally create awesome music in my mind without having to worry about going through the tedious, intellectual task of creating music the hard way. But, if it's not the case my brain has this natural capability, then I'd have to study the rules and create melodies that are actually good and sensible by following said rules. That would make matters more difficult for me (as I explain soon enough). It would be difficult for me to create melodies that express what I want to express, which would make composing less appealing to me.

But, I'm not even sure if there are rules when it comes to creating a melody. Can't a person create any melody he's inspired to create, as long as it has a rhythm and scale? I thought melody writing all comes down to a person's inspiration and creativity, and that there are no more rules when it comes to this. In this Q&A Section packet, I go by the assumption that there are no more rules to follow when creating melodies, other than having a rhythm and scale. But, at the same time, I do consider the possibility that I'm wrong and that there are more rules. I really don't know since I'm a complete beginner when it comes to composing. So, I don't know much at all.

Other Person's Response: So, you think your mind is naturally capable of following even the rules of proper melody writing. Do you consider the possibility that your mind isn't naturally following these rules though?

My Reply: Yes, I do. But, from what it sounds, the melodies in my mind sound like actual music. They sound like melodies that are actually awesome, powerful, profound, and conveying of scenes. This is why I conclude that my brain is naturally capable of following even the rules of melody writing (if there are such rules).

Other Person's Response: I do hear people say that the rules of music theory hinder creativity. If you ever watched the episode of Sponge Bob titled "Artist Unknown," you'll get the idea. So, you might be right when you say there are no rules when it comes to melody writing, and that a person can just create an awesome or powerful melody through inspiration alone.

My Reply: Well, I might be wrong.

Other Person's Response: I bet you're naturally hearing beautiful, powerful, singing voices singing these melodies you're creating in your mind. Don't let that fool you. Just because the singing voices are beautiful and powerful doesn't mean the melodies are beautiful and powerful. If a beautiful singer sang a rubbish melody, then the melody would still be rubbish, regardless of how beautiful the singer's voice was.

My Reply: Yes, I do hear awesome, beautiful, and powerful singing voices in my mind. But, from what it sounds like, the melodies also sound beautiful, awesome, and powerful.

Other Person's Response: There's an interesting youtube video I'd like to share to you:

https://youtu.be/qvVQzokeD-g

The guy in the video says you can write any melody you want. You just have to make sure it has a rhythm and that it adheres to a scale.

My Reply: Then why do my melodies sound like meaningless rubbish for other listeners? Maybe that guy is wrong and there are more rules to follow when it comes to melody writing. Perhaps I'm creating melodies that don't follow these rules, and maybe that's why they sound like random, nonsensical, rubbish melodies for other listeners. Then again, I could be creating awesome melodies that I just have to convey somehow to the audience. The guy in that video makes it seem like creating melodies is a natural expression of basically being human.

So, I could be right when I say that human beings are naturally capable of creating awesome or powerful melodies in their minds. If it's true that you can naturally create any melody you want, then that would make composing much more interesting and appealing to me because I'd be free to naturally create whatever melody I want from the awesome, powerful inspiration that dwells within me, and said melody being powerful or awesome (providing, of course, that I've accurately transcribed the awesome or powerful melody I've naturally created in my mind).

From there, I'd have to find a way to convey the power and greatness of this accurately transcribed melody to other listeners so that it doesn't sound like random rubbish. But, if it's the case you can't create whatever melody you're naturally inspired to create and that you must study and follow the rules to create a melody that's actually good and sensible, then composing wouldn't be as appealing to me because I'd have to limit myself to so many rules by thinking, planning, etc. Still, composing is my passion and I still wish to create some awesome, powerful music.

Other Person's Response: Even if you do have to study and follow rules if you want to create good melodies, rather than relying on your inspiration alone to create music, you can still create good melodies that express whatever you want to express.

My Reply: Having to limit myself to these rules would make it more difficult. Especially if they're rules that severely limit me. If I really have to go through this tedious, intellectual process of limiting myself to multiple rules, rather than relying on my inspiration alone to create music, then I think creating melodies that express what I want to express would be much more difficult than creating a good melody.

That's because any average person could create any random, good, sensible melody by following the rules. But, expressing yourself as an individual through melody writing would be more difficult, given that you're so restricted by these rules. I think that's because more abilities are required than simply creating any random, good melody that follows the rules. I have some powerful, profound emotions I wish to express through composing, and I think it would be difficult for me to express them to the audience if I have to be so limited by these rules.

Other Person's Response: Composing may be very appealing to you now. But, are you saying composing would be less appealing to you if you have to create music the hard way?

My Reply: Yes. It would be very difficult for me to express what I want to express, and that's why composing would be less appealing to me.

Other Person's Response: If composing would be so difficult for you, then why not take up writing stories or poetry? You seem like a skilled writer.

My Reply: I'm not interested in any other field of art. Music is what means so much to me. So, composing is what I want to do. If I give up on composing, then I'm going back to playing video games for the rest of my life.

Other Person's Response: So, no other field of art appeals to you?

My Reply: That's right. Composing is the only field of art that appeals to me.

Other Person's Response: If writing isn't a field of art that appeals to you, then why did you even bother typing all this information to share to others? The very fact you've written all this shows you have some level of interest in writing.

My Reply: It's because I just want to share my personal views and my personal experiences. But, I don't want to take up writing stories or poetry. Neither do I wish to write for any other purpose, such as writing articles or essays on scientific topics.

Other Person's Response: I'm a skilled martial artist and I'm curious as to why you don't want to take up martial arts.

My Reply: It's because, let's pretend I was a skilled martial artist, my skill wouldn't convey the emotion/scenes I want to convey to the audience. If anything, it would just convey I'm some badass dude who's skilled at fighting. Besides, I just have no interest in martial arts. My interest lies in expressing certain things to the audience, and I've taken up composing to do that.

Other Person's Response: When the guy in that youtube video plucked out whatever melody he was naturally inspired to create, did you already hear a melody that was sensible and not random rubbish?

My Reply: I did hear sensible melodies from this guy. Even though they're just the melodies themselves, they still sounded like meaningful melodies and not the type of melodies plucked out by a baby. That begs the question as to why my melodies sound like random rubbish for other listeners. I mean, if this guy's melodies alone are sensible to others, then why aren't my melodies sensible to others? Maybe I just didn't accurately transcribe the melodies I hear in my mind. But, I'm quite sure I've accurately transcribed my best dark tune, along with a few others.

Other Person's Response: The guy in that video must be following certain rules when creating his melodies that he neglected to mention. Maybe that's why his melodies are sensible to other listeners, while yours are nonsensical melodies to other listeners.

My Reply: But, the guy even said that things like conversations and speeches, in of themselves, are sensible melodies. So, that already implies that you're free to create whatever melody you want and that said melody should still be sensible for other listeners. He acts as though creating a good, awesome, or sensible melody is a natural expression, no different than having a conversation, speech, or just expressing yourself as a human being. So, he acts as though there are no more rules to follow when creating melodies, other than having a rhythm and scale.

Other Person's Response: If creating awesome or powerful melodies is a natural expression of being human, then that would be wonderful! It shows our brains naturally learn how to express certain emotions/scenes. We'd then use that naturally acquired knowledge to naturally create awesome or powerful music in our minds or on an instrument.

My Reply: Yes.

Other Person's Response: Conversations, speeches, or even expressing yourself (such as yelling a certain sentence) can only amount to senseless, rubbish melodies. That's because they don't adhere to the rules of melody writing. If you listened to a president's famous speech, then the words he's speaking do convey a powerful, meaningful message to the audience. But, if you just took the pitch of each word he's speaking, then that would turn out to be a rubbish melody that makes no sense, musically speaking. If you want a melody to be good and convey something meaningful to the audience, then that's why music theory exists. That's why you must follow the rules of melody writing.

My Reply: Well, when I listen to a powerful speech from a president in a short video clip, the melody itself of the speech sounds powerful and beautiful to me. The melody brings out the power and beauty of the speech itself. If I were to listen to the melody alone, it would be like I'm listening to the speech itself. So, I think this shows human beings are naturally capable of expressing power and beauty not only through words (such as giving a speech), but through melodies. But, for whatever reason, my melodies aren't conveying their power and greatness to the audience.

Other Person's Response: Do you think the rules of music theory are basically the rules of natural, human expression? In other words, if a person gives a powerful speech, do you think the melody of his speech naturally follows the rules of music theory?

My Reply: If there are rules when it comes to writing a melody, then I think the melody of his speech would naturally follow these rules. So, that's a "yes" to your question. If a person gives a moving, powerful speech, haven't you ever heard people in the audience say that this was music to their ears? Well, this is to be taken literally because the melody of that speech would be actual music since it follows the rules of melody writing. But, I might be wrong. If the melodies of speeches were to be analyzed, they might not adhere to the rules of melody writing.

Other Person's Response: So, when the melodies of speeches have a rhythm and scale, you think they'd be sensible melodies?

My Reply: Yes. Some of them can be great and memorable melodies.

Other Person's Response: If any melody we naturally create would be a sensible melody, then what would constitute a senseless melody?

My Reply: It would have to be a melody that wasn't naturally created through personal expression, such as a completely random melody. Such a melody would be one plucked out by a baby. Personal expression would be things like speeches, conversations, yelling certain sentences, etc. So, any created melody that goes outside of that would have to be a senseless melody. But, some melodies created through personal expression do sound like senseless rubbish. An example would be my melodies. I'm not exactly sure why that is. Maybe I just didn't accurately transcribe them.

Other Person's Response: There are forms of natural expression that are already great works of art. For example, helping someone and changing someone's life would be a beautiful work of art to witness. Given this, why can't melodies themselves be forms of natural expression that are great works of art?

My Reply: Exactly. I thought human beings are naturally capable of creating awesome, beautiful, and powerful melodies.

Other Person's Response: Your melodies really make no sense and they just don't work out. There's no pattern to your melodies in terms of melodic intervals. It seems you just have notes randomly placed all over. Melodies need to have this type of pattern in order for them to be good melodies that make sense to others.

My Reply: I'm not sure about this. I thought a person could create awesome, memorable melodies through naturally expressing himself as an individual. I know I had a music teacher once who told me to just write whatever melody I was inspired to create. He never talked about my melodies needing to have a melodic pattern. The teacher's name was Don Estes at Griggs (a place for buying music accessories).

He was an old man. So, I'd expect him to be a wise music teacher since he's old. If he's so wise, he would've pointed out to me that my melodies need this pattern if they really needed them. Also, I only saw Don for a short while. I struggled with many miserable moments in my life and that's why I gave up seeing him. I gave up on my composing dream entirely. But, I might see him again someday since I'm fully recovered now and am no longer having those miserable struggles.

Other Person's Response: Maybe the real melodies in your head do have a melodic pattern and you're just bad at reproducing what you hear in your head.

My Reply: It's quite possible. But, I'm quite sure that I've reproduced the exact notes to, for example, my best dark tune (which is the very 1st tune I linked you to in the beginning of this packet).

Other Person's Response: If you can't naturally create good, sensible music in your mind, then you say it might be difficult for you to create melodies that express what you want to express by going through the intellectual process of following the rules of music theory. Maybe you should just take it one note at a time and see what type of melodies you can come up with. Who knows, you might be successful and create melodies that express what you want to express to your audience.

My Reply: I'm doubtful. I already tried this while studying some rules, and it just didn't work out. When I listened to my melodies, they didn't express what I wanted to express. So, I decided to scrap these melodies.

Other Person's Response: I take it you've discovered that there are rules when it comes to melody writing. You tried to create melodies that follow these rules. But, you just couldn't create the melodies that express the powerful, profound scenes you wish to express.

My Reply: Correct. I put some thought and planning into it. But, it just didn't work out.

Other Person's Response: Maybe you just need to study all the techniques you can in order to create the music you want to create.

My Reply: I'm not sure if that's the case.

Other Person's Response: Do you wish to create catchy melodies and themes? For example, the Super Mario theme song is catchy.

My Reply: Yes. I'm failing at this, too. When I follow the rules that I studied, I just can't create melodies that are catchy and memorable.

Other Person's Response: Maybe you just need more practice to create the music you want to create.

My Reply: That could be. But, I don't know. Maybe I'm just incapable of this.

Other Person's Response: Maybe it's not a matter of it being difficult for you to create melodies that express what you want to express by going through the intellectual process of following the rules. Perhaps you just don't have this ability at all. So, even if you did acquire much knowledge and experience in composing, you just might not have this ability.

My Reply: I hope that's not the case. Even if I did write a melody that I thought expressed what I wanted to express by going through the intellectual process of following the rules, I hope this melody actually expresses what I want to express to the audience. In other words, I hope the audience doesn't experience a completely different meaning or scene from my melody than the one I intended to convey.

Other Person's Response: You said earlier you've discovered there are rules when it comes to writing a melody. I don't think your melodies follow these rules, and that's why they sound like rubbish.

My Reply: Yes. I've studied some rules of melody writing, and I've revised my Super Sonic tune so that it follows these rules. I think I'm just no good at transcribing the awesome, memorable melodies in my mind, and that's why I need to study these rules to help me do so. Anyway, I think this Super Sonic tune now follows the rules, and this revised tune is my most recent tune I'm sharing here. So, consider this very reply to be my most recent update. As for this tune, the chords go from I-V and V-I. This would be an imperfect and perfect cadence. There's also a IV chord in there as well, which goes back to the I chord.

This would be a plagal cadence. The notes of the melody are the chord tones. I think this melody is great, memorable, and catchy. If, for whatever reason, it's still a rubbish melody that doesn't follow the rules of proper melody writing, then maybe I just need to revise this melody even more so that it follows these rules. Only then will this awesome, memorable melody I'm trying to convey be successfully conveyed to the audience. If I revise all my other melodies so they follow the rules, then maybe they will also become the great, memorable melodies I've naturally created in my mind. Anyway, here are the links to this revised Super Sonic tune, along with a few other recent melodies I've made:

Youtube Link to revised Super Sonic tune:


Soundcloud Link to revised Super Sonic tune:


Music Sheet of revised Super Sonic tune:


Now, here is a lovely melody, ominous melody, and another melody I've made titled "On A Higher Level":

Youtube link to lovely melody:


Soundcloud link to lovely melody:


Music sheet of lovely melody:


Youtube link to ominous melody:


Soundcloud link to ominous melody:


Music sheet of ominous melody:


Youtube link to On A Higher Level:


Soundcloud link to On A Higher Level:


Music sheet of On A Higher Level:


Other Person's Response: What if you make your melodies follow all the rules, but they still sound like senseless rubbish for other listeners?

My Reply: Then, like I said, something more would be needed to convey their power and greatness. Or, maybe, I was creating senseless, rubbish melodies all along.

Other Person's Response: What if you make your melodies follow all the rules, people tell you they sound like sensible melodies, but that they're lame or mediocre melodies?

My Reply: Then maybe something more is needed to convey their power, greatness, and memorable quality. Or, maybe, I was just creating lame, mediocre melodies in my mind to share to the world, and I just thought they were awesome, memorable melodies when they really weren't.

Other Person's Response: What if you're naturally creating sensible melodies in your mind, you successfully convey these melodies to the audience, but said melodies are mediocre or lame, don't express the scenes you describe, and are just melodies you think are awesome, memorable, and express the scenes you describe when they really don't?

My Reply: Then that would be frustrating for me. Even if the melodies I'm naturally creating in my mind are awesome and memorable, as long as they don't express the things I think they express, then that would still be frustrating because I wish to create melodies that are not only awesome and memorable, but express the scenes, characters, and moments I wish to express to the audience.

Other Person's Response: When you transcribe the melodies in your mind, is it much easier for you to accurately transcribe the note lengths, as opposed to the note pitches?

My Reply: Yes. I have a difficult time accurately transcribing the note pitches.

Other Person's Response: Even if your brain does naturally know all the rules of music theory, it's still possible for your brain to make errors when it naturally creates an awesome, powerful, memorable melody in your mind.

My Reply: Which means I'd just need to correct those errors when I transcribe that melody.

Other Person's Response: If your brain naturally knows the rules of music theory, then you'd already have all the knowledge you need to create awesome, memorable music in the real, physical world, and not just in your mind. So, it makes me curious as to why you think you're naturally creating awesome, memorable music in your mind, but not in the real world.

My Reply: Even though I can naturally create awesome, memorable melodies in my mind, I wouldn't know the technical details of what I've created in my mind. For example, I wouldn't know that the melodies in my mind start on the tonic note and end on the tonic or dominant note. I could also naturally create a chord progression in my mind. But, I wouldn't know that the chord progressions would be a I-V, V-I, IV-V, IV-I, etc.

The only reason I know these technical details now is because I've read about them online. So, even though the melodies I naturally create in my mind follow the rules of music theory, I wouldn't know the technical details. I need to know these technical details because I don't think I'm skilled at transcribing my mentally inspired melodies, and knowing these details would allow me to create melodies that are awesome, memorable, and accurately transcribed, as opposed to inaccurately transcribed rubbish.

Other Person's Response: Even if your brain does naturally know all the rules of music theory, that wouldn't be enough for you to create great, memorable, catchy melodies in your mind, such as the McDonald's tune, or any other memorable tune for that matter. It requires much talent and training to create such melodies, in addition to having knowledge of the rules of music theory.

My Reply: I'm not sure that's the case. Sure, it requires talent. But, would it really require training to create such melodies in my head, when I already know all the rules of music theory?

Other Person's Response: Even if you did know all the technical details, it's still possible to inaccurately transcribe the melodies you've created in your mind.

My Reply: Which means I'd also need the ability to skillfully transcribe the melodies in my mind. If I had a professional level of this skill, then I could just accurately transcribe the melodies in my mind without even knowing any of these technical details. But, if I had a moderate level of this skill, combined with knowledge of these technical details, then I could still accurately transcribe my melodies.

Other Person's Response: When you transcribe the melodies in your mind and, from there, revise these melodies so they follow the rules of melody writing, do they become completely different melodies than the ones you've naturally created in your mind? Or, do they actually sound like the awesome, memorable melodies in your mind?

My Reply: At first, they were completely different melodies. This frustrated me because I thought I was naturally creating awesome, memorable melodies in my mind, just to find out I had to stick with completely different melodies that actually follow the rules. They were average, mediocre melodies. From this, I concluded I must not be naturally creating any awesome, sensible melodies in my mind. If I really was creating such melodies in my mind that follow the rules, then the revised, transcribed melodies would sound like the ones in my mind.

They didn't, and I grew frustrated. But, then I tried again and actually discovered that they do sound like the ones in my mind. A great example would be my Super Sonic melody. Therefore, I must've made the wrong revisions, which made the transcribed melodies sound different than the ones in my mind. For example, if I started the transcribed and revised Super Sonic melody on the notes Eb and C, rather than the notes I've chosen for the recently revised melody, which would be F and C, then that would be the chord tones of a V chord in the key of F minor, rather than a I chord in F minor.

That V chord would need to go back to a I chord. To do that, I'd need to chose notes that fit that I chord. So, my next couple of notes to complete that bar would be something like F and Ab. This ends up creating a completely different melody than the one I hear in my mind because the first few notes of the melody would be Eb and C (the notes of a V chord), and F and Ab (the notes of a I chord), rather than F and C (the notes of a I chord), and the next couple of notes I've chosen for the V chord, which would be Eb and G. I think you should look at the music sheet of my Super Sonic melody to help you understand what I'm talking about here.

Other Person's Response: So, not only is it important that your melodies follow the rules, but that you make them follow the rules in such a way that they sound like the melodies in your mind. Otherwise, you'd end up with a completely different melody than the one you've created in your mind, due to the rules putting you in a position where you'd need to choose completely different notes for these melodies that fit whole new chord progressions.

My Reply: Yes. I'd be ending up with completely different melodies that are mediocre and don't sound like the awesome, memorable ones in my mind.

Other Person's Response: In regards to the melodies of famous speeches, they don't classify as actual music. They're just rubbish. But, you can make them into good, sensible melodies that not only follow the rules of melody writing, but sound close to the actual speeches themselves. Just because you have to make these melodies follow the rules doesn't mean they have to be melodies that sound completely different than the speeches.

My Reply: Sure. That would be wonderful because I could express anything I want through melody writing, and the melodies not having to be completely different than what I wanted to express.

Other Person's Response: You later thought you weren't naturally creating awesome, memorable melodies in your mind. But, then you discovered you might be after all. Therefore, does composing appeal greatly to you now, knowing that you can just naturally create such melodies in your mind, and that you don't have to go through some tedious, intellectual process to do so?

My Reply: Yes. But, I still need to go through an intellectual process when making sure my transcribed melodies not only follow the rules, but sound like the awesome, memorable melodies in my mind. I'm perfectly alright with this and I actually enjoy this. But, if it was the case I wasn't naturally creating any awesome melodies in my mind to begin with, then composing would be less appealing to me because it would no longer be a matter of trying to convey some awesome melody I've naturally created in my mind.

Instead, it would be a tedious, intellectual process of trying to come up with an awesome, profound, or memorable melody in my mind to begin with. That would be difficult and I might find myself giving up composing. The fact is, composing becomes much more interesting and appealing to me when I can naturally create awesome and powerful melodies from within, and just have to find a way to convey them to the audience.

Other Person's Response: Maybe the melodies you're naturally creating in your mind are just expressions at this point, and not actual music. But, if you transform these expressions into actual melodies that work, they might turn out to be awesome and memorable melodies.

My Reply: That could be the case.

Other Person's Response: I have some advice to give you in regards to your Super Sonic melody. I think the issue here is the number of bars. Having 9 bars, followed by a bar's rest, creates an unnatural break in the flow when the tune is played again. Normally, melodies are arranged in 8 bars, 12 bars, 16 bars etc. Try changing the timing of the second part of your tune. Apart from that, the sounds & arrangement sound fine to me.

My Reply: Thanks for your response. Now, as I said before, my goal in composing is to not only create melodies that are awesome and memorable, but express the given scenes, moments, characters, etc. I wish to express to the audience. You said this melody sounds "alright" to you, which means you're acting like it's a basic or mediocre melody. That must mean I'm not achieving my goal because, if I was, then you'd be saying something like: "WOW, THIS MELODY IS AWESOME, AND SHOULD BE FAMOUS!!! I'LL ALWAYS REMEMBER THIS BEAUTIFUL MELODY!!!"

It would be like if I've created a new, famous, nursery rhyme of my own for you to listen to. If you were to listen to it, you'd be giving such an exclamatory response. Since you're not giving such a response to this melody, I can only gather I'm not achieving my goal. It becomes frustrating when I can't achieve this goal because I'm not expressing myself to the audience. I'm not expressing the awesome, memorable emotions/scenes I think I'm expressing to the audience. So, something's not right here.

Other Person's Response: Your Super Sonic melody really isn't my sort of music. So, I'm trying to be objective. Reactions, such as thinking something is awesome, are completely subjective, and will be different for each and every person. For ANY piece of music, you will get some who will love it, some who will hate it, some who are indifferent, and everything in between. If your goal is to please everyone, you'll never achieve it.

My Reply: My goal isn't to please everyone, because I know everyone can't be pleased. However, most people can be pleased and think a certain melody is awesome and memorable, even if it is a short melody. For example, short, famous, nursery rhymes are things many people find awesome and memorable, even though there are a few people out there who wouldn't like them. If I share this revised, Super Sonic melody to many people, and most people think it's a basic or mediocre melody that's nothing memorable, then I'd find that frustrating.

Other Person's Response: Do you expect to be those types of composers who put hours and hours into making a craft that others would enjoy? Or, are you satisfied with making short, simple melodies, as long as said melodies convey the awesome, memorable emotions/scenes you wish to express to your audience?

My Reply: I'd be satisfied with making these short melodies. Sure, I could go all the way and be one of those hardcore composers who really pleases the audience with fully crafted songs. But, as long as I'm achieving my goal of pleasing most people with short, awesome, memorable melodies, then I think that's good enough.

Other Person's Response: I thought you didn't care about the opinions of others. So, why do you wish to please others through your music?

My Reply: It's because I wish to create music that's truly awesome and memorable, and share it to the world so it gets heard and praised. I don't wish to be creating music that I just think is awesome, when it's really not. Imagine if someone wanted to come up with ideas that are awesome and memorable. It would be absurd and pointless for him to just dedicate his life, coming up with ideas that he thinks are great, when they're really rubbish. As a matter of fact, it would be a wasted life. So, it would be a wasted endeavor for me to create rubbish or mediocre music that I just think is great and expressing of certain scenes.

Other Person's Response: It would be interesting to find out, scientifically, what makes a person talented at composing. Some people don't have talent, which means they can't create music that's catchy and expresses what they want to express. But, other people have talent, which means they can create great, awesome, and catchy themes (such as the Super Mario theme). If science can find this out, then maybe there will be a way to invent some sort of technology that can bestow talent to untalented people.

My Reply: That would be great. That means I could have a great, composing talent right now and create awesome music that expresses the powerful, profound scenes I wish to express.

Other Person's Response: There's a song written by Hanson called "MMMBop." That means even kids can write awesome music that expresses what they want to express. If they can do it, then so can you! After all, you're an adult.

My Reply: Well, these must be talented kids with advanced mental capabilities since they can do this. I'm not sure if I have what it takes.

Other Person's Response: Learning how to write good music that expresses what you want to express can't be that difficult, can it? Even kids learn how to do it.

My Reply: I have been learning some music theory on a website called www.mymusictheory.com. Some things I understand on that website, while other things I don't quite understand (such as certain aspects of melody writing). I've always been the type of person who has a difficult time figuring things out on his own and doing certain things with nobody there to help me and hold my hand the whole way through. If I tried on my own, I would always fail. When I was in school, I required an aid (a woman) to help me because I was incapable of making it on my own. I think that's because I'm an autistic, special needs person. I talk even more about this later on.

Other Person's Response: It shouldn't be that difficult to comprehend the rules of music theory. Maybe that website explains the rules in such a way that makes it difficult for you.

My Reply: I think that is the case. When I listened to the rules of melody writing in a youtube video, it was much easier for me to understand. But, Victoria Williams (the music theory teacher on that website I linked to earlier) goes into a bit complicated detail which makes it difficult for me. It becomes difficult when she explains melody writing. Her explanations left me with questions that I couldn't figure out on my own.

Other Person's Response: When you listen to music that isn't your style (doesn't appeal to you) and said music really is powerful and awesome, do you still acknowledge that it's powerful, awesome music? Or, do you just say it's crap music because it doesn't appeal to you?

My Reply: I still acknowledge it as powerful and awesome.

Other Person's Response: When you naturally create music in your head, having no knowledge of how music works, you won't create any good music that expresses what you want to express to the audience. But, having much knowledge in composing, you can naturally create such music. At first, you will have to put much thought into creating music when you're first learning how to do it. That's because there are rules to follow and things to take into consideration. But, over time, you'll naturally create good music.

My Reply: I hope I can naturally create good music that expresses what I want to express then. I hope I can achieve this goal someday. People might tell me to give up composing right now since I'm no good at it. But, I'll only give up when I'm absolutely sure that I can't achieve my goal of creating the music I want to create.

Other Person's Response: Why not pursue another field of art besides composing? You could certainly express what you want to express through writing stories or poetry. Could you explain why composing means so much to you?

My Reply: I'll explain. First of all, music is just what means so much to me. Simply put. Secondly, all other forms of art are quiet. They don't make noise. For example, if an author has written a good story or if a painter has created an awesome painting, then the other person would just have to look at the painting or read the story. But, music is different because you could blast the stereo or computer speakers.

I'd consider music to, thus, be a more potent form of art. It's more loud and impulsive than other forms of art. It seems to be more expressive than, say, a story or painting that quietly sits there, waiting for the audience to read it or look at it. Music gets right in your ears. It's like a person screaming into your ears.

If it was a calm, relaxing song, then it would be like someone speaking gently to you. My point is, music speaks or screams, while all other forms of art are quiet. Sure, other forms of art do speak or scream in their own way (which would technically classify them as "noisy" works of art in their own, unique way). But, music is just what means so much to me.

I think it's a fact that many people prefer music over other art forms. If you ask many people, I bet they'd tell you they'd prefer to listen to some loud, awesome music, than to sit or stand there, reading an awesome story, or looking at an awesome painting. For me, music is the greater form of art since it triggers the greater emotional response within me than other art forms.

Actually, it would be having a combination of sound, music, imagery, and story that would trigger the greater emotional response within me. For example, if I heard the loud noise of a monster while also witnessing the image of the monster out of nowhere, that would trigger the greater fear response within me than simply hearing or looking at the monster.

Another example would be that witnessing a female character, witnessing her actions, knowing her story/personality, hearing her theme song, and hearing her voice would trigger the greater feeling of beauty or love within me than simply witnessing the image of this female character. So, it's when different forms of art combine that create the greater work of art and the greater, more profound, emotional response.

For example, the Legend of Zelda and Super Mario are great games. They combine imagery, sound, and good story telling. If it was just the story, sound/music, or imagery, then that wouldn't be as great as the video games themselves which combine all those forms of art. It just wouldn't trigger as powerful of an emotional response within the audience.

I'm not saying I wish to pursue multiple fields of art to create video games or movies, which combine multiple forms of art. I just wish to pursue one field of art and stick with it. That would be composing. I have no interest in any other field of art anyway. Now, I realize all fields of art are equal and no one is inferior to the other. But, for me, composing is what I want to do.

Other Person's Response: If you were to ask people if they'd prefer to listen to awesome music, or to instead look at awesome paintings and read beautiful stories, I bet many people would prefer to listen to music. They'd prefer to just crank up their speakers and groove to the music. That shows many people are more moved and motivated by music than any other art form. So, I understand why you want to make music rather than painting or writing stories.

My Reply: Yes. For me, music evokes the more profound and powerful emotion than any other art form. What's interesting about me is that I don't want to create the same old, lame music you hear a lot on the radio. As a matter of fact, I don't even want to create music that falls under the normal category. My music would be bizarre, out of the ordinary (not normal), and otherworldly.

Other Person's Response: Even though music triggers the more powerful and profound emotion than any other art form for you, do other works of art still trigger powerful and profound emotions for you?

My Reply: Yes.

Other Person's Response: If you ever do compose some awesome music that expresses what you want to express to the audience, you can combine your music with Sonic the Hedgehog videos or any other type of video you see your music fitting to. That would certainly create a greater work of art than having the music alone.

My Reply: That's what I plan on doing. Also, take note that, even though I'd use Sonic the Hedgehog video clips, my music wouldn't suit the Sonic universe. My music would be very powerful, evil, bizarre, otherworldly, and awesome. So, I'd be expressing Sonic in my own, unique way. I'd also use Dragon Ball Z or Dragon Ball Super video clips as well for my awesome music. That is, if I ever do create such awesome music someday.

Other Person's Response: If you can never create the music you want to create, then why not just make AMVs (anime music videos)? You can take music that already exists and add it to video clips.

My Reply: I don't want to do that.

Other Person's Response: I realize those naturally inspired melodies in your head do adhere to a scale and aren't just randomly chosen notes. But, that's not enough in order for a melody to be meaningful, great, and conveying of certain scenes to listeners. So, even if you do fully craft your melodies and give context to them, they'd still be rubbish even though they do adhere to a scale. The fact is, your melodies are lacking in other attributes necessary to make them great and meaningful. You claim the chosen notes and rests of your short melodies make them great and memorable just like those short tunes such as the McDonald's I'm Lovin' It tune.

You're wrong. It takes a well-trained and well-educated composer to create great and memorable melodies like this. It can't be done through naturally creating tunes in your head through inspiration. It doesn't matter how powerful the inspiration is because no amount of inspiration can trump training and education. Can a martial artist become a fighting master just through his inspiration and passion alone? No! He needs to be trained and educated in martial arts to come up with some good moves. He can't expect to come up with some awesome moves in his mind if he doesn't know martial arts. If he does, then they'd just be rubbish moves.

My Reply: Well, since I discovered that these naturally inspired melodies adhere to a scale and have a pattern in terms of the notes, it's quite possible these melodies are also great and do convey the scenes I described. Again, if you want an example of how the notes of my melodies have a pattern, then look at the music sheet of my Super Mario Galaxy tune or the music sheet of my Strange Melody. I circled the pattern I see with the notes. Also, I think our brains already do have musical knowledge that allows us to naturally create great, memorable music in our heads. I talk about this later on.

Other Person's Response: Speaking of your best dark tune, I do see a pattern in terms of the notes. For this tune, you use the notes G, C, Ab, Eb, and F. C, Eb, and G is the C chord in F minor, and the notes F and Ab would be the notes of an F chord in F minor. The C chord would be the dominant chord in F minor, while the F chord would be the tonic chord in F minor. A dominant chord going to the tonic chord, or a tonic chord going to a dominant chord would be a perfect or imperfect cadence.

My Reply: Thanks for pointing that out! I find it quite interesting how my naturally inspired melodies end up having a pattern to them. All of my melodies might not have a pattern to them though. However, these could just be poorly reproduced melodies. If I accurately reproduced them, then they might have a pattern.

Other Person's Response: Haven't you ever come up with an idea in your head that you thought was good, only to find out it makes no sense and just doesn't work out? My point is, you might be coming up with melodies in your head that you think are awesome, memorable, and expressing of certain scenes. But, perhaps later on you'll find out that was never true. You might find out that they really were rubbish melodies.

My Reply: Yes, that did happen to me. I did come up with certain ideas for video games that I thought were good, only to find out that they don't work out. I shared my ideas to video game fans on forums and they told me why my ideas are no good. But, I'm not sure if the same thing applies to the melodies I'm creating in my head. This might be a different situation. It seems quite possible my melodies are great and sensible, given that there's a pattern to them.

Other Person's Response: I bet your ideas for video games were good and people were just bashing them.

My Reply: If I was someone working for Nintendo or Sega, the Nintendo or Sega team would also tell me my ideas are bad, make no sense, and don't work out. I don't think a single person there would tell me my ideas are good. If I listen to people who are experienced professionals, rather than blindly accepting the opinions of people such as you and my mother, I'll get the real truth.

Other Person's Response: You say the Nintendo or Sega team would be telling the truth if they told you your ideas are no good. I thought you couldn't decide what's true though.

My Reply: I don't think it would be a situation where the Nintendo or Sega team would debate whether my ideas would be good or not. They'd all tell me they're no good. Besides, these are the creators of famous video games such as Sonic the Hedgehog and Super Mario. So, they know what's best for these games.

Other Person's Response: There are fans who think the Nintendo or Sega team are doing things all wrong. For example, Sega fans would say the recent Sonic games suck. The fans preferred Sonic back in the old days. That means there are fans who disagree with the ideas put forth by Nintendo or Sega. Likewise, there are ideas put forth by fans that Nintendo or Sega disagrees with. Even if these are experienced, hardcore fans, there will still be a disagreement between their ideas and the ideas put forth by Sega or Nintendo. They'd find themselves in a debate where the ideas would be debated. So, even your ideas would be put to debate.

My Reply: In which case, I really wouldn't know then if my ideas are good or not, given that they'd be debated.

Other Person's Response: If you realize that your mentally inspired melodies really were rubbish all along, would you still hear them as great and conveying of those scenes you described? Or, would you now hear them as the meaningless rubbish that they really are?

My Reply: It's quite possible I'd still hear them as great and conveying of those scenes. Let me give you an example to illustrate my point. If person A was nice and harmless, and person B thought he was cruel and harmful, then if person B later learned that person A really was nice and harmless, then person B might still feel that he's cruel and harmful anyway. Person B might still get that same vibe from person A. My point is, certain thoughts or feelings can still linger on even though we realize the truth. Another example would be phobias. People know the truth that there's no reason to fear. But, they still fear anyway.

Other Person's Response: Let's pretend you successfully conveyed your melodies to other listeners and there were experienced musicians debating whether your melodies are meaningless rubbish or if they're awesome, you're saying you'd have to remain undecided on this?

My Reply: Yes. I wouldn't know if my melodies are meaningless rubbish or not. That even applies to my melodies as they are now, in their beginning stage of development. If people debate whether my melodies will be great or if they'd be rubbish once they become successfully conveyed, I'd have to remain undecided on this as well.

Other Person's Response: If your melodies really were great and did follow all the rules of composing, then people would be hearing them as great. If a melody truly is great, then it should sound great on its own. Thus, there'd be no need for anything more than the melody itself for others to listen to. But, having more would further bring out the melody's power and greatness. The reason why your melodies convey no power and greatness whatsoever to others is because that's what they really are. They're just rubbish melodies.

My Reply: Even if you do create a melody that's great and follows all the rules of composing, the melody alone might still sound like a tune plucked out by a baby. So, I really do think more things are needed to bring out the power and greatness I see in my melodies. Also, a person could create a melody that follows all the rules of composing, successfully convey that melody to the audience, but it still sounding like a meaningless melody, plucked out by a baby.

That's because something more is required to make a melody great or meaningful other than having a melody that's successfully conveyed and skillfully follows all the rules of composing. It must be a melody that actually expresses something great or meaningful. That means it must be a melody inspired from within. It must be inspired by the power, greatness, and meaning within yourself.

So, following the rules when it comes to creating artwork doesn't make a great or meaningful work of art. Rules are there just to assist you. They help you create a great or meaningful work of art. But, it really all comes down to inspiration. Once you've been inspired to come up with a great, meaningful work of art in your head, the rules would be there to help you convey your awesome vision to the audience.

Other Person's Response: If you created any random, good melody or theme that follows all the rules of music theory, and said melody or theme has been fully crafted and successfully conveyed to the audience, you're saying it might still sound like a senseless melody or theme, plucked out by a baby? You're saying it's inspiration that creates the awesome, sensible melodies and themes, while the rules are simply there to help you convey said melodies and themes to the audience?

My Reply: Yes. You can have an awesome, sensible melody or theme that follows all the rules of music theory. But, it's possible to have a senseless, rubbish melody or theme that also follows all the rules of music theory. So, it's inspiration and talent that determines if you create some awesome, sensible melodies and themes or not. The rules are just there to assist you and help you make necessary revisions.

Other Person's Response: Imagine if there was a lame, mediocre song on the radio that many people hated. The melody is very lame and people just find it bland. Even if the song was given much more craftsmanship to make it a skillfully crafted song, it would still be lame music. The melody, even though it was given much more artistic detail, would still be a lame, bland, mediocre melody. So, that says you can be a very skilled composer with much knowledge and experience who follows all the rules of composing. But, that doesn't mean you're going to create good music.

My Reply: Yes. It all comes down to inspiration since that's what really creates the awesome music. If you're the type of person who's inspired to come up with lame, mediocre music, then that's unfortunate for you. But, if you're inspired to come up with some awesome music, then that's wonderful! Inspiration is even necessary to create melodies that are meaningful and not just rubbish melodies that sound like random noise, plucked out by a baby. So, it's possible to create skillfully crafted melodies that follow all the rules of composing and have been successfully conveyed to the audience, but said melodies turning out to sound like meaningless noise for other listeners.

Other Person's Response: You claim that a great melody might not sound great or meaningful when it's just the melody itself being played for others. So, people who do listen to the melody and claim they're hearing something great or meaningful might simply be attributing greatness or meaning to a melody that, in reality, doesn't sound great or meaningful. Human beings are irrational and they do attribute greatness and meaning to things that are nothing great or meaningful.

My Reply: Yes. As for the melodies I'm creating in my head, I could be the irrational one, claiming there's power and greatness to my melodies that I have to convey to the audience. I could just be making rubbish tunes in my head without realizing it.

Other Person's Response: If our brains are equipped with musical knowledge, then why don't you naturally know things like a good chord progression?

My Reply: Although I could naturally create a good chord progression in my head since my brain can do that, I'd have to accurately reproduce that chord progression. I might get it wrong. Since there are so many different types of chords, then that makes it more difficult to reproduce chords than reproducing single notes I hear in my head. For example, if I was hearing a C chord in my head, I wouldn't know what type of C chord it is. So, I might reproduce the wrong type of C chord.

Even though I can naturally produce good music in my head, I don't actually know the technical aspects of what's going on. So, that leaves me in a position where all I can do is try to reproduce what's in my head without actually having any musical education to help me out. In other words, the type of musical knowledge I have is simply knowledge that allows me to naturally create good music in my head (i.e. knowledge gained through statistical learning). But, it's not the type of knowledge gained through education which would help me out and give me insight.

Other Person's Response: Could you give me another example of one of those short, great, memorable tunes?

My Reply: Yes. If you've ever heard the short tune that goes something like: "Tyler, Tyler, he's our man! If he can't do it, nobody can!," then that would be another example. Again, I think I'm naturally creating great, memorable tunes like this in my head.

Other Person's Response: I heard your father is a talented musician. So, maybe you have some of his talent and you are making some great tunes!

My Reply: I'm open-minded towards the possibility that these tunes in my mind are rubbish even though I claimed they're great. I think they're great. But, that doesn't make it so. In regards to my father, he is a talented musician. He's a very skilled guitar player and he's been playing the guitar for many years. My mother also has some musical talent and the DJ tells her she's a good singer.

But, what about me? I could have some natural musical talent I have to convey to the world. Or, maybe, I never had any musical talent. Lastly, in this packet, I say a lot of things to give people an open mind to the possibility that I really do have a musical talent others don't realize yet. I have every reason to think these tunes I'm making in my head are great and I explain these reasons. I also explain many more things.

Other Person's Response: Personally, I think you have no talent. You have no abilities whatsoever as a human being.

My Reply: Maybe you're right. As I point out later on, if I'm no good at composing, then playing video games is the only other hobby I'm interested in and it's the hobby I've been doing my whole life. I love the Super Mario and Zelda games because they're adventure games. I completed these games many times and my mind loves to go on a beautiful, joyful, peaceful adventure through my positive emotions.

Other Person's Response: Do you wish to be a composer since your dad is such a skilled musician?

My Reply: No. Composing is just something I wanted to do.

Other Person's Response: What is the point in writing this whole packet? It's a waste of time and effort. All that time and effort could be dedicated to fully crafting your music, which you claim is so great.

My Reply: By writing all of this, I'm showcasing my own support and defense for my claim that I really do have a musical talent. Besides, I have an obsession when it comes to sharing my personal views and that's why I write so much. But, if I don't have a musical talent, then all the things I say in this packet might as well be a matter of showcasing just how much of a pathetic joke I am. If I really have no talent and amount to nothing as a human being, then why not waste time and effort writing all of this?

Other Person's Response: Well, I don't think it's a waste of time and effort writing these packets. If you are wrong and you never had a musical talent, then people can look back at this packet anyway and gain insight into your way of thinking and looking at things. I think people would still find it interesting to read.

My Reply: Sure.

Other Person's Response: Is there another reason why you write this whole packet?

My Reply: Yes. If I have no mental, musical talent, and everything I'm saying is all lies, then I might as well amount to nothing more than someone who writes bull ****. So, I might as well write this whole packet.

Other Person's Response: I think your Super Sonic tune is really good!

My Reply: The thing is, I want the cold, hard truth as to whether my melodies are great or not. That means I must get feedback from professional musicians rather than average people. So, just because you think my Super Sonic tune is good doesn't mean it is. It could be some average, lame tune. Or, maybe, it is great and other people don't realize this yet since more things are needed to bring out the melody's power and greatness. If it's the truth my melodies aren't that good, then I'm prepared for such truth and won't be upset one bit by it.

Other Person's Response: I think your tunes suck! Just because you envision yourself as a professional musician in your head, coming up with awesome melodies, doesn't make it so.

My Reply: What's wrong with my tunes and what makes them so bad? Are there any technical flaws making them awful? I especially ask this question in regards to my Super Sonic tune because this is my most recent one.

Other Person's Response: What does your mother think of your tunes? If she thinks they're great, then she has no clue what she's talking about!

My Reply: I have shared them to her and she does think they're great. My father lives somewhere else. But, if I shared my tunes to him, he might think they're awful. Even though my mother is naturally a good singer, she isn't educated on the subject of composing. So, my dad is the professional musician here which means he might give me the cold, hard truth.

Other Person's Response: Then your mother must be like one of those families who think their sons or daughters should be the next American Idol. The families think their singing is great. But, they have no clue what they're talking about.

My Reply: This could be the case with my mother. She thinks my tunes are great and they might be rubbish.

Other Person's Response: Your mother thinking your tunes are great is a good example of how human beings are irrational. People project meaning and greatness upon things that are just plain rubbish and meaningless.

My Reply: Yes. But, I think the tunes in my mind are great and I have yet to accurately reproduce them and make them fully crafted tunes.

Other Person's Response: If your mother likes one of your tunes, how would you know for sure if it's an awesome tune and not just one she thinks is great when it's not?

My Reply: First of all, I'd share my music online and get feedback from others because I don't know for sure if some of my tunes really are great. Second, if I have one of my tunes play for my mother to listen to, but she doesn't respond to it while she's going about her daily activities, then it's probably not a good tune. If she stops and says something like: "Hey, I really like that tune!," then that's not a trustworthy judgment. But, if she says something like:

"WOW, THAT IS AN AWESOME, INCREDIBLE TUNE!!!," then maybe I do have a good tune here since it would be a tune that really stands out to her, unlike my others tunes. However, I still wouldn't trust her judgment. I'd still share that tune to others online and get their feedback. So far, I haven't had one tune where my mother gives the big, exclamatory response. If she did give such a response, then that would be like saying: "Jackpot! You could really have a good tune here!"

Other Person's Response: I heard your mother is a good singer. But, does she also sing her own tunes?

My Reply: Yes. There's one tune she sung for me, which was a tune she made when she was in school. To me, it sounded good, memorable, and catchy. It sounded like one of those nursery rhymes for children. Even though she thought her tune was awful, I thought it was good. Now, my mother also sings other tunes she makes on seldom occasions. I think they are good, too. Maybe she also thinks they're good.

Other Person's Response: You keep using the term "catchy" to describe music. What do you mean by that?

My Reply: Music that is catchy is also called "earworms." That means they're tunes or songs that stick in your mind and repeat over and over again. Like I said, I think I'm creating catchy tunes in my mind. I even hear professional, beautiful singers singing some of my created tunes in my head because I sometimes use beautiful singers to come up with melodies in my head.

Other Person's Response: You're the less capable individual and your mother has to take care of you. But, since your mother is more capable, maybe she has the musical talent, is singing some good tunes, while you have no musical talent whatsoever. Or, maybe, you just like her tunes, she likes yours, but neither your tunes, nor hers, are anything good.

My Reply: It could be the case she is making awful tunes that I just think are great. Maybe she should get some feedback from others. That way, we'll know for sure if she's making some good tunes or not. If they are good tunes, then she should also get feedback as to whether her tunes express what she wanted to express. In my opinion, I thought that one tune she made in school was good and was like a nursery rhyme. But, perhaps it's neither good nor expresses anything of the sort.

Other Person's Response: You're good at doing certain things though. You're a good writer since you have good punctuation, spelling, and grammar. You're also good at playing video games.

My Reply: But these are average, basic things I'm good at. Having good spelling, punctuation, and grammar is an easy, basic skill to have. Being good at adventuring through levels as Super Mario is also a basic skill. Ask any child or teenager if he or she's good at playing Super Mario games and I bet many of them will say "yes." But, when it comes to making music or doing any other form of art, that's an advanced skill that's much more difficult to obtain. So, if I really am making awful music, then it would be very difficult for me to create good music.

Other Person's Response: Learning good spelling, punctuation, and grammar was not some basic, easy skill you've acquired. You had to acquire this skill through schooling. You must also school yourself on composing if you wish to create some good music that makes sense to others.

My Reply: I think I'm naturally capable of creating great music in my head and I just need some schooling to successfully convey the awesome music I hear in my head.

Other Person's Response: You don't have to go to a class to get education. You can just learn online.

My Reply: That's what I'm doing. I'm learning music theory online.

Other Person's Response: I wonder how poor people become good composers. They can't afford lessons, books, or the internet.

My Reply: I do find myself wondering how they manage to create good music in the real, physical world.

Other Person's Response: Instrument choice is also very important when making music.

My Reply: Sure. But, if someone grew up with a certain instrument and played beautiful songs on that instrument, those songs would still be beautiful. My point is, just because you have a different instrument choice doesn't mean the power, beauty, and greatness of any melody, theme, or song you play should be taken away. The power, greatness, and meaning of music should still stand regardless of what instrument choice you have.

Having the right instruments simply brings out the intended emotion even more. But, said music can still convey its intended emotion and greatness even without the proper instrument choice. This is because the series of notes, chords, rests, etc. chosen for a piece can still convey their power and meaning even when the proper instruments aren't chosen.

Other Person's Response: What makes you think you are creating really good tunes in your head? For all we know, they could be crap tunes.

My Reply: As I said before, I have autism and it's said that autistic people are gifted. People who are gifted tend to be incapable in other areas and highly advanced in one area and I think I could be that person. I think I might be creating really good music in my mind that I have yet to share to the world. Once people recognize its greatness, they should see me in a whole new light. There is also another reason why and I explain later on.

Other Person's Response: I heard some autistic people are savants and you say you have autism. But that doesn't mean you're a savant.

My Reply: That could be so. But, still, maybe having autism does give me an upper hand when it comes to creating music in my head because I think the melodies I'm creating in my head are awesome.

Other Person's Response: According to your philosophy, which you've written about in your previous packets, the only thing that would make your music great is if people felt positive emotions from it.

My Reply: That's correct. But, I go outside my own personal definition of beauty and greatness when I talk about my music being great or beautiful. It's just for the sake of convenience.

Other Person's Response: Explain why you think our brains are naturally capable of creating great works of art in our heads.

My Reply: Sure. Even if you're a complete novice who has no knowledge and experience whatsoever in any field of art, you can still naturally create entirely new, great works of art in your head, whether it be through drug trips, dreams, or just plain inspiration. During dreams and drug trips, you witness awesome and beautiful artwork with no effort at all since your brain automatically creates it for you.

If you've ever talked with people who went on psychedelic trips, I bet they'd tell you they've witnessed beautiful landscapes they've never seen before, met beings they've never met before, and heard angelic music they've never heard before. Psychedelic trips allow any average person to enter beautiful or hellish realms. These realms are great works of art, created by our brains. The beings, music, landscapes, etc. are all beautiful, awesome, hallucinatory works of art.

Here's a youtube link which explains the amazing, beautiful things people witness during their drug trips. Since our brains are naturally capable of creating such amazing things, then why couldn't my brain naturally create awesome, powerful music in my mind? I think inspiration alone is all I need to create such music in my mind, which means I don't need to study any rules in music theory to do so. Anyway, here's the youtube link:

https://youtu.be/16EFVCZ8JK4

Other Person's Response: When people go on psychedelic trips, are they literally entering different realms? Or, are they just hallucinating?

My Reply: I'm not sure.

Other Person's Response: If our brains aren't naturally capable of creating great works of art in our minds, and the works of art that are naturally witnessed during drug trips and dreams are great works of art, then that must mean these great works of art reside in actual realms, visited by our minds or souls. Our minds would peer into other realms during dreams, and they'd detach from our physical body and visit realms during drug trips.

My Reply: That could be. I don't know.

Other Person's Response: Only savants can naturally create great works of art in their minds and there are few savants.

My Reply: You don't need to be a savant to naturally create great works of art in your mind. I talk about this when I say our brains naturally create whole new, great works of art during dreams, drug trips, and near death experiences.

Other Person's Response: I think you're talking nonsense! Our brains don't naturally create great works of art whether it be through dreams, drug trips, or any other method!

My Reply: Haven't you ever had a dream of any given environment or scene that you never witnessed before? I bet you have. For example, you could dream of a scene in Harry Potter that never happened such as Harry opening up a portal and flying in a futuristic, technological, city. This shows our brains do have this natural capability to create great artwork. I, myself, had a dream of a labyrinth version of my old home.

My old home became a beautiful, complex, work of art in this dream. I think our brains can create much more complex, amazing works of art through dreams and drug trips than our normal, waking life because perhaps certain mental processes are being more dedicated towards these astonishing tasks.

Other Person's Response: Could you explain to me another dream you had?

My Reply: Sure. I had a dream of a scene in the show Futurama which was a scene that never happened. I'm not sure if you've ever watched that show. But, I'll explain the dream anyway. The character Fry is a cunning psychopath in this dream (although, that's not his normal personality in the actual show). He takes on many tough opponents and defeats them one by one. Each opponent is given his/her scene and Fry is shown defeating each opponent.

There is one scene where there are 2 robots fighting each other in the alley. The 1st robot keeps on beating down the 2nd one. But, the 2nd one keeps on getting back up since he's a very tough opponent. Fry then comes along to the very entrance of the alley with a female robot he's created himself. I'd call this female robot the 3rd robot. This robot resembles the wife of the 2nd robot. Fry and the 3rd robot make out and the 2nd robot becomes devastated and heart-broken upon seeing this.

That devastation causes the 2nd robot to literally fall apart into pieces. Thus, the 2nd robot becomes defeated. Fry had a cunning trick to defeat the 2nd robot. Once he's defeated, Fry gives a sinister smile. So, there's my dream. As you can see, this dream I had was a good work of art that conveyed deep meaning. The deep meaning it conveyed was that even the most tough people can be beaten down by moments such as his wife cheating on him. You could call it deep meaning or simply a life lesson.

Other Person's Response: You say Fry is the cunning one in this dream. But, you're the cunning one since it's your brain that created this scene. So, that makes you the cunning artist.

My Reply: I agree.

Other Person's Response: Later on in this packet, you talk about a comical scene you made during your waking life which involves a tough guy who's unbeatable. There are other tough guys who slam their fists into him and it doesn't phase him at all. Then, a little kitten comes along, scratches the tough guy's leg, and that defeats him. It seems the Futurama scene you dreamed of is sort of like an improvised version of that comical scene you made in your waking life.

My Reply: I agree. I think that Futurama scene I dreamed of is better than the tough guy scene I made in my waking life.

Other Person's Response: You say we have dreams where we witness things we've never witnessed before.

My Reply: Yes. We have these dreams and nightmares all the time. For example, you could witness one of your family members doing something they never did in reality.

Other Person's Response: I do agree we have dreams where we witness and hear things we've never heard and seen before. But, I don't agree they're great works of art. I just don't agree that our brains are naturally capable of creating great works of art in our heads.

My Reply: Think of an awesome, vivid dream you had. Are you sure that dream wasn't a great work of art?

Other Person's Response: How do our brains naturally create great works of art?

My Reply: Maybe our brains can take already-existing information whether it be from a show or anything else and create whole new scenes and works of art that are wonderful, glorious, beautiful, and amazing. As you can see here, we don't have to know anything about how to create works of art; our brains will create amazing works of art for us through inspiration, dreams, etc.

That's how I'm creating these amazing themes and tunes in my head through inspiration alone without knowing anything about composing. Technically, our brains do have a form of knowledge that allows us to naturally create great works of art in our heads because, without any knowledge of how to do that, then our brains wouldn't have the ability to create great artwork. I think it would be an instinctive form of knowledge and not the type of knowledge one would gain from studying up on things.

Other Person's Response: Do you have any article that supports your claim that our brains have an instinctive form of knowledge that allows us to create great works of art in our minds?

My Reply: Yes, actually. In this article, it talks about how we instinctively know things about music. They're things we know, but we don't know how we know them. It's called "statistical learning." I think we as human beings naturally learn what series of notes and rests convey the power, meaning, and emotion we want to convey. It's no different than how we naturally learn the English language and choose a series of words to convey the power, meaning, and emotion we want to convey. I think that's how we're able to naturally create great and powerful melodies or themes in our minds. Here's the article:

getpocket.com/explore/item/the…

Other Person's Response: After having read that article, I think I get what you're saying. The article says we naturally have remarkable musical abilities. You think one of these abilities is to naturally create great and powerful music in our minds.

My Reply: Yes.

Other Person's Response: Even if you are naturally creating great music in your head, that doesn't make you a great artist. A truly great artist is someone who takes the time to learn and train himself to convey his artistic vision.

My Reply: I disagree. I think I'm a great, professional artist on the inside since I'm creating great music in my head. I'm just not a professional artist on the outside since I can't make any good music in the real, physical world.

Other Person's Response: You shared this article and you're giving all your supporting arguments to support this idea that you're some sort of gifted, amazing composer in your head. I think it's all lies just to make yourself look great. I think you know deep down that you have no musical talent and amount to nothing as a composer.

My Reply: That's not true. I'm undecided as to whether I really am this awesome, musical artist who's creating great music in his mind, or if I'm creating rubbish music in my mind that I just think is great.

Other Person's Response: In that article, it says we naturally have as much musical knowledge as an expert musician. Therefore, I think our brains really are naturally capable of creating great music. Our brains can make use of that knowledge to create some awesome music in our heads.

My Reply: Yes.

Other Person's Response: If you really must create music by training and educating yourself, rather than relying on your inspiration alone, then it's still possible you can naturally create awesome music in your mind that expresses what you wish to express. But, only providing that you have much musical training and education. Only trained professionals can naturally create such music in their minds.

My Reply: In that article I gave a link to, it says we already have a professional level of musical knowledge, naturally ingrained within us. That means I already am a professional composer in my own head who can naturally create such music in his mind.

So, I don't think I even need to create music the hard way (or the tedious, intellectual way of creating a melody on the keyboard from scratch, and making sure the notes I choose on the keyboard not only adhere to the rules of melody writing, but make a melody that conveys something memorable, great, and expresses the scene, moment, or character I wish to express).

Instead, I'd simply have to accurately transcribe the awesome music I've naturally created in my mind, which already meets all those criteria I mentioned above in parenthesis. From there, I'd have to somehow convey the power and greatness of this accurately transcribed music to the audience. Lastly, I will quote something from the article:

"But the more psychologists investigate musicality, the more it seems that nearly all of us are musical experts, in quite a startling sense. The difference between a virtuoso performer and an ordinary music fan is much smaller than the gulf between that fan and someone with no musical knowledge at all."

Other Person's Response: Since brains can naturally create great works of art with no effort at all (an example being drug trips), then that means brains effortlessly follow artistic rules to create the beautiful landscapes, beings, and music during drug trips. Given this, why couldn't your brain naturally create awesome, powerful music through inspiration alone with hardly any effort?

My Reply: Exactly. The only effort I'd need to put in would be imagining whatever scene or character I wish to create a theme or melody for when naturally creating awesome music in my mind. Imagining these things would get my inspiration all pumped up. I'd also have to channel the emotion I wish to express when creating music in my mind.

If I create music in my mind without channeling powerful and profound emotion, then, chances are, the music wouldn't turn out to be that powerful and profound. So, I think creating awesome music in my mind is simply a matter of imagining and channeling emotion.

I don't think it has to be an intellectual process of thinking about the rules and making sure I've chosen the right notes and rests in my mind that follow these rules. I'd be a bit disappointed if this intellectual process really was necessary because, again, it would make matters tedious and difficult.

Other Person's Response: I'm not allowed to visit that website which has the article. So, could you share the article here?

My Reply:

The Music in You

You might not be a virtuoso, but you have remarkable musical abilities. You just don't know about them yet.

Twenty years ago, a pair of psychologists hooked up a shoe to a computer. They were trying to teach it to tap in time with a national anthem. However, the job was proving much tougher than anticipated. Just moving to beat-dominated music, they found, required a grasp of tonal organisation and musical structure that seemed beyond the reach of an ordinary person without special training. But how could that be? Any partygoer can fake a smile, reach for a cheese cube and tap her heel to an unfamiliar song without so much as a thought. Yet when the guy she’s been chatting with tells her that he’s a musician, she might reply: ‘Music? I don’t know anything about that.’

Maybe you’ve heard a variation on this theme: ‘I can’t carry a tune to save my life.’ Or: ‘I don’t have a musical bone in my body.’ Most of us end up making music publicly just a few times a year, when it’s someone’s birthday and the cake comes out. Privately, it’s a different story – we belt out tunes in the shower and create elaborate rhythm tracks on our steering wheel. But when we think about musical expertise, we tend to imagine professionals who specialise in performance, people we’d pay to hear. As for the rest of us, our bumbling, private efforts — rather than illustrating that we share an irresistible impulse to make music — seem only to demonstrate that we lack some essential musical capacity.

But the more psychologists investigate musicality, the more it seems that nearly all of us are musical experts, in quite a startling sense. The difference between a virtuoso performer and an ordinary music fan is much smaller than the gulf between that fan and someone with no musical knowledge at all. What’s more, a lot of the most interesting and substantial elements of musicality are things that we (nearly) all share. We aren’t talking about instinctive, inborn universals here. Our musical knowledge is learned, the product of long experience; maybe not years spent over an instrument, but a lifetime spent absorbing music from the open window of every passing car.

So why don’t we realise how much we know? And what does that hidden mass of knowledge tell us about the nature of music itself? The answers to these questions are just starting to fall into place.
The first is relatively simple. Much of our knowledge about music is implicit: it only emerges in behaviours that seem effortless, like clapping along to a beat or experiencing chills at the entry of a certain chord. And while we might not give a thought to the hidden cognitions that made these feats possible, psychologists and neuroscientists have begun to peek under the hood to discover just how much expertise these basic skills rely on. What they are discovering is that musicality emerges in ways that parallel the development of language. In particular, the capacity to respond to music and the ability to learn language rest upon an amazing piece of statistical machinery, one that keeps whirring away in the background of our minds, hidden from view.

Consider the situation of infants learning to segment the speech stream – that is, learning to break up the continuous babble around them into individual words. You can’t ask babies if they know where one word stops and a new one begins, but you can see this knowledge emerge in their responses to the world around them. They might, for example, start to shake their heads when you ask if they’d like squash.

To investigate how this kind of verbal knowledge takes shape, in 1996 the psychologists Jenny Saffran, Richard Aslin and Elissa Newport, then all at the University of Rochester in New York, came up with an ingenious experiment. They played infants strings of nonsense syllables – sound-sequences such as bidakupado. This stream of syllables was organised according to strict rules: da followed bi 100 per cent of the time, for example, but pa followed ku only a third of the time. These low-probability transitions were the only boundaries between ‘words’. There were no pauses or other distinguishing features to demarcate the units of sound.

It has long been observed that eight-month-old infants attend reliably longer to stimuli that are new to them. The researchers ran a test that took advantage of this peculiar fact. After the babies had been exposed to this pseudolanguage for an extended period of time, the psychologists measured how long babies spent turning their heads toward three-syllable units drawn from the stream. The babies tended to listen only briefly to ‘words’ (units within which the probability of each syllabic transition had been 100 per cent) but to stare curiously in the direction of the ‘non-words’ (that is, units which included low-probability transitions). And since absolutely the only thing distinguishing words from non-words within this onslaught of gibberish was the transition probabilities from syllable to syllable, the infants’ reactions revealed that they had absorbed the statistical properties of the language.

This ability to track statistics about our environment without knowing we’re doing so turns out to be a general feature of human cognition. It is called statistical learning, and it is thought to underlie our earliest ability to understand what combinations of syllables count as words in the complex linguistic environment that surrounds us during infancy. What’s more, something similar seems to happen with music.

In 1999, the same authors, working with their colleague Elizabeth Johnson, demonstrated that infants and adults alike track the statistical properties of tone sequences. In other words, you don’t have to play the guitar or study music theory to build up a nuanced sense of which notes tend to follow which other notes in a particular repertoire: simply being exposed to music is enough. And just as a baby cannot describe her verbal learning process, only revealing her achievement by frowning at the word squash, the adult who has used statistical learning to make sense of music will reveal her knowledge expressively, clenching her teeth when a particularly fraught chord arises and relaxing when it resolves. She has acquired a deep, unconscious understanding of how chords relate to one another.

It’s easy to test out the basics of this acquired knowledge on your friends. Play someone a simple major scale, Do-Re-Mi-Fa-Sol-La-Ti, but withhold the final Do and watch even the most avowed musical ignoramus start to squirm or even finish the scale for you. Living in a culture where most music is built on this scale is enough to develop what seems less like the knowledge and more like the feeling that this Ti must resolve to a Do.

Psychologists such as Emmanuel Bigand of the University of Burgundy in France and Carol Lynne Krumhansl of Cornell University in New York have used more formal methods to demonstrate implicit knowledge of tonal structure. In experiments that asked people to rate how well individual tones fitted with an established context, people without any training demonstrated a robust feel for pitch that seemed to indicate a complex understanding of tonal theory. That might surprise most music majors at US universities, who often don’t learn to analyse and describe the tonal system until they get there, and struggle with it then. Yet what’s difficult is not understanding the tonal system itself – it’s making this knowledge explicit. We all know the basics of how pitches relate to each other in Western tonal systems; we simply don’t know that we know.

Studies in my lab at the University of Arkansas have shown that people without any special training can even hear a pause in music as either tense or relaxed, short or long, depending on the position of the preceding sounds within the governing tonality. In other words, our implicit understanding of tonal properties can infuse even moments of silence with musical power. And it’s worth emphasising that these seemingly natural responses arise after years of exposure to tonal music.
When people grow up in places where music is constructed out of different scales, they acquire similarly natural responses to quite different musical elements. Research I’ve done with Patrick Wong of Northwestern University in Illinois has demonstrated that people raised in households where they listen to music using different tonal systems (both Indian classical and Western classical music, for example) acquire a convincing kind of bi-musicality, without having played a note on a sitar or a violin. So strong is our proclivity for making sense of sound that mere listening is enough to build a deeply internalised mastery of the basic materials of whatever music surrounds us.

Other, subtler musical accomplishments also seem to be widespread in the population. By definition, hearing tonally means hearing pitches in reference to a central governing pitch, the tonic. Your fellow partygoers might start a round of Happy Birthday on one pitch this weekend and another pitch the next, and the reason both renditions sound like the same song is that each pitch is heard most saliently not in terms of its particular frequency, but in terms of how it relates to the pitches around it. As long as the pattern is the same, it doesn’t matter if the individual notes are different. This capacity to hear these patterns is called relative pitch.

Relative pitch is a commonplace skill, one that develops naturally on exposure to the ordinary musical environment. People tend to invest more prestige in absolute pitch, because it’s rare. Shared by approximately 1 in 10,000 people, absolute pitch is the ability to recognise not a note’s relations to its neighbours, but its approximate acoustic frequency. People with absolute or ‘perfect’ pitch can tell you that your vacuum cleaner buzzes on an F# or your doorbell starts ringing on a B. This can seem prodigious. And yet it turns out not to be so far from what the rest of us can do normally.

A number of studies have shown that many of the other 9,999 people retain some vestige of absolute pitch. The psychologists Andrea Halpern of Bucknell University in Pennsylvania and Daniel Levitin of McGill University in Quebec both independently demonstrated that people without special training tend to start familiar songs on or very near the correct note. When people start humming Hotel California, for example, they do it at pretty much the same pitch as the Eagles. Similarly, E Glenn Schellenberg and Sandra Trehub, psychologists at the University of Toronto, have shown that people without special training can distinguish the original versions of familiar TV theme songs from versions that have been transposed to start on a different pitch. ‘The Siiiiiimp-sons’ just doesn’t sound right any other way.

It looks, then, like pitch processing among ordinary people shares many qualities with those gifted 1-in-10,000. Furthermore, from a certain angle, relational hearing might be more crucial to our experience of music. Much of the expressive power of tonal music (a category that encompasses most of the music we hear) comes out of the phenomenological qualities – tension, relaxation, and so on – that pitches seem to possess when we hear them relationally.

Musical sensitivity depends on the ability to abstract away the surface characteristics of a pitch and hear it relationally, so that a B seems relaxed in one context but tense in another. So, perhaps the ‘only-prodigies-need-apply’ reputation of absolute pitch is undeserved at the same time that its more common relative is undervalued. Aspects of the former turn out to be shared by most everyday listeners, and relative pitch seems more critical to how we make sense of the expressive aspects of music.

Another vastly undervalued skill is just tapping along to a tune. When in 1994 Peter Desain of Radboud University in the Netherlands and Henkjan Honing of the University of Amsterdam hooked up a shoe to a computer, they found what many studies since have demonstrated: that to get a computer to find the beat in even something as plodding and steady as most national anthems you have to teach it some pretty sophisticated music theory.

For example, it has to recognise when phrases start and stop, and which count as repetitions of others, and it has to understand which pitches are more and less stable in the prevailing tonal context. Beats, which seem so real and evident when we’re tapping them out on the steering wheel or stomping them out on the dance floor, are just not physically present in any straightforward way in the acoustic signal.

So what is a beat, really? We experience each one as a specially accented moment separated from its neighbours by equal time intervals. Yet the musical surface is full of short notes and long notes, low notes and high notes, performed with the subtle variations in microtiming that are a hallmark of expressive performance. Out of this acoustic whirlwind, we generate a consistent and regular temporal structure that is powerful enough to make us want to move. Once we’ve grasped the pattern, we’re reluctant to let it go, even when accents in the music shift. It’s this tenacity that makes the special force of syncopation – off-beat accents – possible. If we simply shifted our perception of the beat to conform with the syncopation, it would just sound like a new set of downbeats rather than a tense and punchy contrary musical moment, but our minds stubbornly continue to impose a structure with which the new accents misalign.

In other words, perception of rhythm depends on a more general ability to synchronise with our surroundings. But this raises the question of why we might have such an ability in the first place. It seems telling that it emerges very early in parent-infant interactions. People tend to speak in specific ways to their babies: slowly, with exaggerated pitch contours, extra repetition, and regular timing (‘so big… so big… sooooooo big’). All of these are more typical of music than in ordinary speech. And it seems that these modifications help infants to engage predictively with the speech stream, anticipating what’s going to happen next, and ultimately to insert their coo or eyebrow lift at precisely the right moment to generate a sense of shared temporal orientation between parent and child, an experience that contributes to the powerful bond between them.

Music piggybacks on this ability, using it to choreograph experiences of shared temporal attention, sometimes among large groups of people. Experiences at concerts, dance clubs and religious services where lots of people move together to a beat often create a powerful sense of bonding. When music allows us to perceive time in a shared way, we sense our commonality with others more strongly.

And so the capacity to track a beat, which might seem trivial on first glance, in fact serves a larger and more significant social capacity: our ability to attend jointly in time with other people. When we feel in sync with partners, as reflected in dancing, grooving, smooth conversational turn-taking and movements aligned to the same temporal grid, we report these interactions as more satisfying and the relationships as more significant. The origins of the ability to experience communion and connection through music might lie in our very earliest social experiences, and not involve a guitar or fiddle at all.

It has often been observed that there is a special connection between music and memory. This is what allows a song such as Tom Lehrer’s The Elements (1959) to teach children the periodic table better than many chemistry courses. You don’t need to have any special training to benefit from the memory boost conferred by setting a text to music – it just works, because it’s taking advantage of your own hidden musical abilities and inclinations. Music can also absorb elements of autobiographical memory – that’s why you burst into tears in the grocery store when you hear the song that was playing when you broke up with your boyfriend. Music soaks up all kinds of memories, without us being aware of what’s happening.

What’s less well-known is that the relationship goes both ways: memory also indexes music with astonishing effectiveness. We can flip through a radio dial or playlist at high speed, almost immediately recognising whether we like what’s playing or not. In 2010, the musicologist Robert Gjerdingen of Northwestern University in Illinois showed that snippets under 400 milliseconds – literally the blink of an eye – can be sufficient for people to identify a song’s genre (whether it’s rap, country or jazz), and last year Krumhansl showed that snippets of similar length can be sufficient for people to identify an exact song (whether it’s Public Enemy’s Fight the Power or Billy Ray Cyrus’s Achy Breaky Heart). That isn’t long enough for distinctive aspects of a melody or theme to emerge; people seem to be relying on a robust and detailed representation of particular textures and timbral configurations – elements we might be very surprised to learn we’d filed away. And yet we can retrieve them almost instantly.

That fact becomes both more and less amazing when you consider just how steeped in music we all are. If all the exposure in elevators and cafés and cars and televisions and kitchen radios was put together, the average person listens to several hours of music every day. Even when it isn’t playing, music continues in our minds – more than 90 per cent of us report being gripped by a stubborn earworm at least once a week. People list their musical tastes on dating websites, using them as a proxy for their values and social affiliations. They travel amazing distances to hear their favourite band. The majority of listeners have experienced chills in response to music: actual physical symptoms. And if you add some soaring strings to an otherwise ordinary scene in a film, it might bring even the hardiest of us to tears.

So, the next time you’re tempted to claim you don’t know anything about music, pause to consider the substantial expertise you’ve acquired simply through a lifetime of exposure. Think about the many ways this knowledge manifests itself: in your ability to pick out a playlist, or get pumped up by a favourite gym song, or clap along at a performance. Just as you can hold your own in a conversation even if you don’t know how to diagram a sentence, you have an implicit understanding of music even if you don’t know a submediant from a subdominant.

In fact, for all its remarkable power, music is in good company here. Many of our most fundamental behaviours and modes of understanding are governed by similarly implicit processes. We don’t know how we come to like certain people more than others; we don’t know how we develop a sense of the goals that define our lives; we don’t know why we fall in love; yet in the very act of making these choices we reveal the effects of a host of subterranean mental processes. The fact that these responses seem so natural and normal actually speaks to their strength and universality.

When we acknowledge how, just by living and listening, we have all acquired deep musical knowledge, we must also recognise that music is not the special purview of professionals. Rather, music professionals owe their existence to the fact that we, too, are musical. Without that profound shared understanding, music would have no power to move us.

Other Person's Response: Do you have the natural ability to pick up on the beat of a song?

My Reply: I don't think I do.

Other Person's Response: Then what makes you think you have the ability to naturally create great music in your head?

My Reply: Because other natural abilities can still remain intact even though other ones are absent. So, even though I might not have certain natural musical abilities such as picking up on the beat of a song, I still might have the natural ability to create great music in my head.

Other Person's Response: Maybe you really do have the natural ability to pick up on the beat of a song and that ability is just turned off since you have no interest in grooving to a song.

My Reply: That could be so. When I listen to music, I do feel powerful and profound emotions. But, I don't groove to music. Also, I'm able to naturally create a beat for my melodies. So, maybe you're right.

Other Person's Response: According to you, we should all have a musical talent since we can all naturally create great music in our heads.

My Reply: Correct. However, some people require dreams and drug trips to naturally create great works of art in their heads since they can't do it in their daily life. Maybe they just need to awaken the ability to do it in their normal, daily life. I think I have because I'm naturally creating great music in my head without the need for drug trips or dreams to pull it off.

Other Person's Response: Try to come up with an idea pertaining to any given subject while having no knowledge and experience in that subject. You might think your ideas are great and meaningful. But, I dare you to share them to people experienced in these fields and they'll tell you your ideas are nonsense. Whatever musical tunes you're inspired to create in your head will also be nonsense because you have no understanding of music theory. Your melodies will be nothing great, they'll be rubbish, and they'll make no musical sense.

My Reply: Well, I'm able to naturally speak the English language and the things I say make sense to others and convey powerful meaning. So, why couldn't I naturally create music in my head that also makes sense and conveys powerful meaning? Statistical learning allows us to naturally create great ideas and works of art in our heads. But, things our brains haven't naturally learned would only render us without that natural gift. When you talk about coming up with nonsensical ideas, you'd be talking about a situation where our brains haven't naturally learned something.

Other Person's Response: If you're naturally coming up with great melodies, then why do so many people think they're awful?

My Reply: It's because they're not fully crafted melodies. I talk about this more later on.

Other Person's Response: To be good at anything, that requires study and practice. Creating great works of art in our minds is no exception.

My Reply: It's obvious to me, at least, that our brains are naturally capable of creating great works of art and melodies in our heads. If you casually said the phrase: "I went to the store today," that would be an average melody because you could translate that spoken phrase into a melody. If you said or sung that same phrase differently, but with power and greatness, it would very likely be a great melody and not just some average melody.

So, you could either say/sing that phrase in your mind in the most basic, bland way, or you could naturally say/sing it in a whole new way that makes it a great melody. When you come up with average, lame melodies, that's just your "average joe" within you speaking. But, when you bring out that awesome artist that naturally dwells within you, that's like your inner god speaking or singing an awesome melody. Of course, other people might not understand the awesome melodies you're trying to convey and they might think they're awful.

That's why you must learn how to convey their power and greatness. Conveying a basic, lame melody would yield a meaningful melody to other listeners. But, it wouldn't be that good of a melody. As for my melodies, I don't think they're lame or awful. Once I convey them, you should realize they were awesome melodies all along. I'm just no good at conveying my melodies at this point and that's why I must improve as an artist so I can convey them.

Other Person's Response: If our brains were naturally capable of creating great works of art, then that would be a miracle which means there'd be no need for books on music theory. We wouldn't need any training and education.

My Reply: Well, even though our brains are naturally capable of creating great works of art, we need education and training anyway because we'll suck at trying to convey our mentally inspired works in the physical world. That's why we still need those books. Imagine a novice who has created a wonderful drawing in his head. If he attempted to draw what he's envisioned, then it will suck. The drawing in his head is great. But, what he drew would be awful. When I created my tunes, I thought the chords and other things I've added to go along with them was good enough. I mean, even though these are basic chords I've added to my Super Sonic tune, aren't they the right chords? Apparently, my tunes still suck and I want to know what's missing and/or what technical flaws need to be addressed.

Other Person's Response: I admit, our brains are amazing, complex organs. But, that doesn't mean we're gods who can naturally create awesome works of art in our heads.

My Reply: I mentioned earlier I had a dream of a labyrinth version of my old home and how it was this beautiful, complex work of art. If I attempted to draw that scene, the drawing would be awful. But, if I could somehow record my dreams and share the actual image I dreamed of, I bet people would say it's a beautiful work of art. As a matter of fact, if we could all record our dreams, I bet they'd be great works of art to share to others. That means even complete novices could share great works of art they've naturally created in their own minds.

Other Person's Response: Your attitude or mindset of believing you're this naturally gifted musician won't get you very far. Nobody can naturally create great music in their heads!

My Reply: I think such an attitude/mindset is something to be proud of because it's being your own boss or master in your own head. You get to be the awesome musician in your own head and you don't have to follow any rules or learn things. Of course, you do have to learn things and undergo musical training if you wish to successfully convey the awesome music you hear in your head to others. But, in terms of creating awesome works of art in your head, you're the master and boss of that. You can be the natural professional!

Other Person's Response: Even if we could somehow record the works of art we naturally create in our minds, I don't think they'd be good works of art. You have to literally be an experienced professional to create good works of art in your head. That's not a natural ability an average person can have.

My Reply: Personally, I think they would be good works of art. That all goes back to what I said about recording our dreams and nightmares. Also, our mentally created works don't have to be the complex craft of an artistic mastermind to be something great. Even simple works of art can be great. When we naturally create works of art in our heads, sometimes, they can be complex crafts while, other times, they can be simple and great. That labyrinth I dreamed of would be an example of a complex, great work of art. But, the simple tunes I'm creating in my head would be an example of a simple work of art.

Other Person's Response: A work of art has to meet certain qualifications to be classified as "good", "awesome," or "great." I'm not sure if our dreams would classify as great works of art.

My Reply: If we were to record our dreams and have professional artists look at them, I bet they would meet these qualifications.

Other Person's Response: If our brains do have this natural ability, then we'd be naturally following the rules of music theory without even realizing it when we naturally create great music in our minds.

My Reply: Yes. These are the rules we need to actually follow. Fortunately, our brains are machines that naturally work according to rules. They work according to the laws of science. The science of music would also be one of these rules our brains naturally follow. That's why our brains naturally follow the rules of music theory.

Since we can naturally choose a series of acts, tones, and gestures that conveys love, joy, hate, sorrow, and greatness, then we should also be able to naturally choose a series of notes and rests in our heads (i.e. create a melody or theme) that conveys love, power, joy, beauty, sorrow, and greatness.

When we naturally display expressions that convey beauty and greatness to others, our brains are naturally working according to certain rules. Therefore, our brains should also have the ability to naturally follow the rules of music theory to create great music in our minds. In other words, since expressing power and greatness through acts, tones, and gestures is a natural ability, then expressing power and greatness through music in your own head should also be a natural ability.

Other Person's Response: We can go outside of these rules if we wanted to because we could create a completely random series of notes and rests in our minds and we could perform random acts, tones, and gestures.

My Reply: Sure. We could do that. Or, our brains can revert back to creating music in our minds that isn't random and allowing us to perform acts, tones, and gestures that aren't random. So, your brain can create whatever it wants. It can create random, lame, or awful music in your mind. It can also make you perform acts, tones, and gestures that are just plain awful or meaningless to others.

But, when you display expressions of kindness and love, these would be expressions that convey power and greatness. Thus, your brain would be allowing you to perform some awesome expressions. The same idea applies to music. Your brain can also naturally create some awesome music in your head.

Other Person's Response: None of what you're saying is true. I'm an experienced composer and I can tell, just from looking at your melodies, that they're no good.

My Reply: Will there be other professional composers and musicians debating you on that? Perhaps they'd say I might have a great melody that I just have to convey to the audience.

Other Person's Response: When you create music, make sure you have a complete and thorough understanding of composing. Don't rely on a little bit of knowledge because that won't get you very far. Go all the way!

My Reply: I used a little bit of knowledge to create, what I thought were, the right chords to my Super Sonic tune. I've also learned how to create melodies that fit a rhythm. Apparently, my tunes still aren't good to other listeners. So, maybe you're right. Maybe I need to learn everything about composing. Only then will I be able to convey the power and greatness of my melodies.

Other Person's Response: Even if you are creating great works of art in your mind, why music? Why not be a painter or drawer?

My Reply: It's because music means more to me and is what I want to do.

Other Person's Response: Why do you wish to be a composer?

My Reply: It's because I wish to express myself. If I asked others to create music for me, it wouldn't turn out how I wanted it to. That's why I create my own melodies. I also plan on creating my own songs later on.

Other Person's Response: Composing good music takes thought, time, effort, training, and talent. Expressing your emotions through music is not quick and easy like expressing your feelings to someone. I'm not sure if you have what it takes to create good music.

My Reply: I'll admit, it would be lovely if it was quick and easy to create the awesome music I want to create. I'm very slow when it comes to understanding things and my brain doesn't process information very quickly. So, if creating good music was quick and easy, I wouldn't have to go through all the trouble of thinking about anything or trying to understand things.

I could just unleash my emotions through music instantly. If I felt angry, I wouldn't want to sit there and think about anything or try to learn anything. I'd want to unleash that anger right then and there. Maybe I'd do it by beating up a punching bag. But, there are emotions I wish to express that I can't express to others. These are emotions that possess profound meaning and power.

Such emotions can only be expressed through art and I've chosen the art of composing to express them. For example, one of these emotions would be the emotion I described for my Distant Future tune. I can't express that emotion through my words, acts, tones, and gestures. Even if I explained the emotion of my tune, that still wouldn't be enough to convey that emotion.

Sure, I could display some acts, tones, or gestures that convey a bit of mystery and I could choose a way to explain the emotion of my tune that also conveys a bit of mystery or bizarre atmosphere. But that just isn't enough to express this profound emotion I'm feeling. That's why I must learn the things necessary to fully craft this tune so that it conveys this profound emotion I want to convey.

Other Person's Response: You say you can instantly express whatever profound emotion you're feeling by creating a musical tune or theme in your head. From there, you're saying you must fully craft these tunes or themes so that they convey the emotion you wanted to convey.

My Reply: Yes. As I said before, certain emotions I feel are profound and they can only be expressed by creating a certain musical tune or theme in my head. But, just sharing the notes and rests to my tunes or themes isn't enough. That's why I must fully craft my tunes and themes. Learning how to fully craft them takes time, thought, and education.

Other Person's Response: If there's any profound and powerful emotion you're feeling that you can't express, then I think it's best to just keep that emotion to yourself. The reason I say this is because you have no talent. You have no way to express these emotions. By the way, if you were talented, you'd be able to express these emotions through poetry, painting, or any other art form.

Just explaining to the audience a certain emotion (such as being in a distant galaxy or time period) isn't enough, like you said. This is because there are certain emotions that can't be expressed by basic, shallow explanations, acts, tones, or gestures. If, for example, you were a talented poet, you could describe things in very profound, poetic ways.

I think said talent would be sufficient to convey that profound, bizarre emotion you want to convey. As you can see, it does take talent to convey profound and powerful emotions and you can't expect to convey these emotions as an average human being with no talent (i.e. through basic tones, gestures, actions, words, and explanations).

My Reply: It sucks not being able to express these emotions. These emotions are inner greatness and people would never realize my inner greatness if I can't express it. For example, some people might come up to me and judge me as an ugly, pitiful, shallow excuse of a human being. But, if I had some amazing talent and could express profound and powerful emotions I'm feeling, they'd see just how awesome and profound of an individual I really am.

Other Person's Response: At least there are certain profound and powerful emotions you can express. For example, you could show how much you love your family or how much gratitude you feel when getting a present.

My Reply: I could express things like love and gratitude. But, said expressions just wouldn't be enough. For example, let's pretend I was feeling a profoundly beautiful feminine love and said love had some sort of aquatic beauty to it. My masculine acts, tones, and gestures wouldn't be enough to convey that emotion. I could act like a female in a magical, aquatic, atmosphere. But, since I have no talent, I would suck at conveying this emotion. As you can see, our inner experience is very profound and powerful and I don't think the acts, tones, gestures, and explanations of untalented folks are enough to express their inner experience.

I think it really does require talent to successfully express that. Not having talent can only render you not fully expressing yourself to others. It would be lovely if people with no talent could telepathically share their inner experience to others. That way, others would know exactly what they were experiencing and what emotions they were feeling. People would see into the inner universe of these individuals and realize the true power that's there, rather than judging based upon the acts, tones, explanations, and gestures of these untalented individuals.

Other Person's Response: You said you feel feminine forms of beauty, joy, and love. Are you gay?

My Reply: No. Emotions take on many different forms. They take on many different characters, atmospheres, etc. So, even a girl who's not lesbian would feel emotions that have a masculine quality to them. For example, a girl could experience the masculine greatness of a bodybuilder. That would be an emotion the girl is feeling. The girl could even feel like she's a male bodybuilder and that would be the character she becomes on the inside. Since she feels that way about herself, that's the same thing as saying she sees herself as a great, male bodybuilder.

Other Person's Response: You said you were mentally disabled and that your brain has a difficult time learning and understanding things. I think having a disability is both a challenge and an advantage because it offers a means of character growth and perseverance. For example, Beethoven having deafness and Stephen Hawking being in a wheelchair challenged them more and that's what built their character even more.

My Reply: Personally, I'd prefer to not have any disabilities because I just want to express myself through music to others and not have to go through all the hassle of trying to learn and understand things. I don't care about building my character through tough challenges. Besides, I can grow as a person through creating great music for others to listen to. I don't have to grow by facing challenges.

That's why I'd prefer to have a genius brain that could understand, remember, and learn things very quickly. So, if I was Beethoven or Stephen Hawking, I'd prefer to not be deaf or be in a wheelchair. What matters to me is that I achieve my goals. Having a disability just hinders that since it takes longer to achieve goals and not as much would be achieved. Imagine how much more Stephen Hawking and Beethoven would've achieved without their disabilities.

Other Person's Response: How is creating great music, without facing any hardships, a form of growing?

My Reply: It's because I'd become more of a person by creating more awesome music to share to the world. The more awesome music I create, the greater musical status I possess as a human being. Likewise, the more amazing discoveries Stephen Hawking would make without his disability, the higher status he has as a human being in science. Sure, his disability has already earned him a high status since it has inspired others to do their best in the face of disabilities or hardships. But, I'd prefer to have no disabilities or hardships. If I was Hawking, I'd prefer more amazing discoveries over inspiring others through having a disability.

Other Person's Response: It seems you're sitting here, complaining how your disability makes things difficult for you.

My Reply: I'm not doing that at all. I'm simply expressing my own preference of having no disability and achieving as much goals the quickest way possible. I'm doing this because I wish to express and share my personal views regarding music, hardships, disabilities, what makes life beautiful and worth living, etc.

Other Person's Response: You said you had speech problems when you was a child.

My Reply: Yes. My brain might've taken a lot longer to naturally learn the English language than normal people. Maybe that's why it took longer for me to start speaking the English language.

Other Person's Response: I think you're lying when you say you're naturally creating great music in your head.

My Reply: If I am lying, then I don't realize it. Personally, I don't think I'm lying.

Other Person's Response: Since you're mentally disabled and a special needs person, then maybe you don't have any talent either. You say you have this natural, musical talent of creating great music in your mind. Perhaps you think you have this talent when you really don't.

My Reply: I hope I have it. If I don't, then I hope I can create some great music later on that conveys the emotions I want to convey.

Other Person's Response: Is there anything else that slows you down besides having a mental disability?

My Reply: Yes. When I'm emotionally fixated on something and trying to figure something out, that slows me down because, when your emotions are active, you can't think clearly and that slows down certain intellectual processes. I find that, when my mind is relaxed, I understand things better and faster. However, I'm still mentally slow due to my disability.

Other Person's Response: Let's pretend you could get a shot that would bestow you with all the knowledge and experience you need to create the awesome music you want to create. Would you get that shot? But I thought you enjoyed the whole process of learning because you said earlier you'd enjoy the process if you had your positive emotions.

My Reply: I'd get that shot anyway because it's just a waste of time for me to sit there and try to understand things I have a difficult time processing and understanding. It would be best if I could achieve my goal of creating awesome music the quickest way possible and that's why I'd get that shot. Since I can't get that shot, I'm willing to do my best to learn harmony and music theory. I'm also willing to improve myself as an artist when I need improvement.

Other Person's Response: Even if you did have all the knowledge and experience you need to create music, why would you think your music would be good? There are musical artists who have much knowledge and experience, but compose stale, lame music.

My Reply: As I said before, I have very awesome, amazing, powerful, and profound emotions to express. So, expressing said emotions through music would result in me creating awesome music. Think of it this way. If I had the ability to magically transform any powerful emotion I felt into a fully crafted theme, melody, or song, then it would turn out to be something incredible. I could also say the same thing about someone else. If another person felt a powerful and profound emotion such as love towards his family, then if he had the magical ability to transform that love into music, his music would be incredible.

Other Person's Response: Let's pretend there was a cd that contained all possible songs, themes, and melodies. That means all compositions you have yet to create would already be on that cd. Not only that, but the greatest music that has yet to be heard would also be on that cd. If all that information on the cd was downloaded into your brain, then you'd know all the tracks on the cd. This would mean you could choose any track you love and want to share. You wouldn't have to compose any music since you could just choose any track you want to share. This would achieve your goal of sharing awesome music the quickest way possible. In the future, this might be a possibility. That means there'd be no need for composers since people can just choose whatever tracks they want to share.

My Reply: Actually, since I wouldn't be the one who created whatever track I've chosen, given there was a machine that produced all possible songs, themes, and melodies, which were then burned on that cd, then that wouldn't be as special as opposed to if I was the one who created them. Sure, I could choose whatever track I want from that cd and share it to express myself just as how I could choose a T-shirt that expresses myself.

But, when I said I wanted to achieve my goal the fastest way possible, I meant I wanted to be the creator of my music. In other words, I'd want to create good music the quickest way possible. It would be boring if I could just choose any tune, theme, or song I wanted. If I create good music, that makes me the artist with a talent and unique vision to share to the world. But, if I could just choose whatever music I wanted to share, then I'd no longer be that artist. I'd now be the equivalent of someone choosing a T-shirt he wants.

Other Person's Response: If you could have the ability to magically and instantly transform your powerful emotions into awesome music to share to the world, would you choose to have that ability?

My Reply: Yes, because I'd still be the creator of my music in this situation.

Other Person's Response: So, if you had the ability to magically and instantly create music that expresses any awesome emotion you're feeling, you'd choose to have that ability?

My Reply: Yes. Since I don't have the talent to create awesome music that expresses my inner feelings, then I'd choose to have that magical ability.

Other Person's Response: When a melody, theme, or song doesn't exist yet and you're the one who created it, then that makes you the creator of said melody, theme, or song. But, when it already exists (such as, let's pretend, on a cd that contains all possible melodies, themes, and songs), then you wouldn't be the creator of it and you'd just be choosing it from that cd.

My Reply: Correct.

Other Person's Response: You say you're slow at learning and understanding things. Are you also slow at taking tests and doing exercises?

My Reply: Yes. Now, I did figure out why I failed those music theory exams and it's because there were some complicated things that I didn't get right. But, when I took music theory exams on a certain website, I passed those exams.

Other Person's Response: How many of these music theory exams are you passing now?

My Reply: The 1st few. But, these exams cover simple, basic concepts. In later grades of music theory, things get a bit more in-depth and difficult. I have a very difficult time understanding more complex concepts. Thus, I might actually fail exams that cover these concepts. Fortunately, there are other things I do understand in these later grades because they're simple concepts. So, I tend to skip past the things I don't understand.

I try to understand them. But, if I absolutely can't, then I just skip past it. As you can see, my main weakness is understanding things. I can only understand simple, basic things. When something is simple and straightforward, it's easy for me to understand. But, when it gets more complicated and there are many things to take into consideration, that's when I run into trouble. I get easily confused and lost.

Other Person's Response: What if a certain concept being presented is very long?

My Reply: It can be long, but still be easy to understand. It all depends on what it is. If it's long, but simple, then it's easy to understand. But, if it's long and more complicated, it's difficult to understand. Likewise, if something is very short, it can be easy or difficult to understand. Also, I misinterpret a lot of things and my mind has a difficult time making sense of many things. But, like I said, there are many things that are easy for me to understand and I understand them right off the bat.

Other Person's Response: Do you also have a difficult time remembering things?

My Reply: Yes.

Other Person's Response: When you create music, do you take ideas from other artists? Do you derive from the works of others? You do realize great artists derived from the works of others, right?

My Reply: I don't derive from others at all. The music I create is purely my own. I just use inspiration to create whatever my brain creates for me. It's as though I instinctively know what series of notes and rests to choose in my head that expresses whatever it is I wish to express. Also, if my music appears like it has derived from the works of others, for whatever reason, then that wasn't my intention.

In other words, I didn't intentionally derive from others. But, since my music is purely my own, then I don't think it should appear derivative. As a matter of fact, it should be quite unique, awesome, and interesting. The type of person I am is someone unique and original. I wish to create my own ideas or music and not take from others.

Other Person's Response: It takes years of education and training to create great music.

My Reply: I don't think so. There are students who take music lessons at school and they end up creating some good tunes. I think I just need to educate myself so I can fully craft my tunes and then I'll share them.

Other Person's Response: Just how talented do you think you are?

My Reply: I think I'm naturally talented and am creating great music in my head. Some of my naturally inspired tunes are like great, catchy nursery rhymes (such as my Wedding Tune), while others convey completely different emotion. An example would be my Distant Future tune and my Dark Tune.

Other Person's Response: Are you a delusional schizophrenic? You sound like one when you say your rubbish melodies are great.

My Reply: I don't have schizophrenia. Therefore, if my melodies really are rubbish and I don't realize it, then I'd simply be ignorant of this. There's a big difference between ignorance and having a mental disorder.

Other Person's Response: The very fact you claim these melodies in your mind are powerful and awesome is plain arrogance! Especially when you said that one of your tunes could be as great as Koji Kondo's!

My Reply: You should be thankful I'm not saying it's a fact that these tunes are as great as I say they are. I am very well open-minded towards the possibility these tunes in my head were garbage all along. So, you should at least appreciate that I'm being open-minded here rather than harping on me.

Besides, I'm an open-minded person in general. I keep an open mind to many things whether it be the afterlife, the soul, god, vaccines being harmful, conspiracy theories, and any fully crafted music I share later on being great or awful. Another thing.

I'm not claiming I'm the only one who can naturally create great music in his head, having no knowledge and experience in the art of music. I'm claiming other people have this natural ability, too. I talk more about it later on as well.

Other Person's Response: What if you're just creating music you think is great and meaningful when it's really rubbish?

My Reply: Then I'd beat myself up over this. Not literally though. So many other people have this natural ability to create great music in their minds and I'd be one of the few people who doesn't have it. I just thought I had it. Hopefully, there would be a way for me to create great music in my mind so that I can fully craft it and share it to others.

Other Person's Response: Well, let me ease your mind by saying that no human being can naturally create great music in his head. He must have musical training and education so he knows how to do that. To beat yourself up over some natural ability that doesn't exist would be no different than beating yourself up over the fact you don't have the powers of Superman. No human being has such powers and, thus, there's no reason to beat yourself up over this.

My Reply: That would ease my mind if that's the case. I'd just have to learn how to create great music like everyone else then and I wasn't this loser who should beat himself up. But, there are reasons why I think this natural ability could very well exist and I explain those reasons in this packet.

Other Person's Response: Could you just show me right now why you think people can naturally create great music in their head, not knowing how music works?

My Reply: Sure. I think creating great music in our minds is a natural ability, no different than naturally expressing our love, joy, hate, and sorrow. Since music is an expression of our love, joy, etc., this means music is a natural expression and that's why we can naturally create great music in our minds.

Other Person's Response: I don't believe you.

My Reply: If a therapist asked someone to envision a beautiful landscape he's never seen before (something of his own creation), then he'd have the ability to do that even though he has no artistic training and education. This shows our brains are naturally capable of creating great works of art in our heads. I believe I'm creating awesome, catchy melodies in my head despite being a complete beginner to the art of composing.

Other Person's Response: I'd like to hear more about this.

My Reply: Sure. Think of it this way. Let's pretend all human beings were telepathic and we could telepathically communicate our thoughts and emotions to others. If I were to telepathically communicate a certain thought or emotion such as a loving thought or a loving emotion, other people would understand it and they'd realize it's a powerful and profound message I'm sharing.

The same thing applies to music. Music is also like a thought or an emotion to be communicated. I should be able to telepathically communicate a great, powerful song or tune of my own to the audience just as how I can telepathically communicate powerful thoughts and emotions. I think it's that simple.

I think I can create great music in my head just as how I can create great thoughts and emotions within myself. A short tune would be like a short message/thought while an entire song would be like a thought or emotion that tells an entire story. I mean, since I can naturally tell a story in my head, then why couldn't I naturally tell a story through music in my head, too?

My point is, creating great music in our minds was never about learning the technical aspects behind music. It was a natural expression all along. However, since I'm obviously not telepathic and can't telepathically share the great music in my head to others, I have to do it the hard way and learn how to fully craft my music so it becomes something great and meaningful to the audience.

Other Person's Response: I see. If a person can naturally tell a powerful story in his head (such as how he lost his loved one or his life as a veteran), then why couldn't he also tell that same story musically in his head? Why couldn't he naturally create a great, powerful melody or song that expresses that in his head?

My Reply: Exactly.

Other Person's Response: You should also keep an open mind towards the possibility that this natural musical ability you claim exists doesn't exist.

My Reply: I'm open-minded towards that possibility as well.

Other Person's Response: If this natural ability to create great works of art in our minds really does exist, wouldn't it take more time and effort for someone to create visual artwork in his mind that expresses the story he wants to convey than simply explaining the story in his mind?

My Reply: Yes. It takes more mental effort and, thus, more time to come up with great and powerful artwork in our minds whether it be music or visual art than simply having a thought or explaining a simple, short story in our minds. However, for some, mentally coming up with great works of art doesn't take much effort at all and they can do it very quickly. But, for those less fortunate who can't do that, there are methods that allow us to do that.

An example would be dreams, drug trips, or near death experiences since it takes no effort in order for whole new beautiful and amazing works of art to be mentally created. You just automatically witness the artwork since your brain automatically creates it. However, in our normal waking life, it takes effort to come up with artwork in our minds. But, like I said, for some, it doesn't take that much effort in their normal, waking life.

Other Person's Response: You can't expect to come up with a good, catchy melody in your head that conveys deep emotion when you don't know how music works. It's like expecting to come up with the cure for cancer when you don't know how stuff works. Sure, you could fabricate what you think is the cure for cancer in your mind. But, I dare you to share your "idea" to scientists and I bet they'd tell you it's nonsensical rubbish.

My Reply: If that's the case, then I'd love to learn how to create melodies and themes that convey what I want to convey. Personally, I think our brains instinctively know how to create good music in our heads.

Other Person's Response: Have you learned some music theory, at least?

My Reply: I've been learning music theory lessons on youtube and I've watched some videos so far. However, these music lessons cover technical aspects regarding music such as scales, chords, key signatures, the circle of 5ths, etc. But, these lessons do not tell you how to create music that conveys the meaning and scenes you want to convey. Sure, they might explain to you that, if you want to create a melody or song that conveys a happy feeling, to put it in a major scale.

But, how would you create a happy tune that expresses someone having fun on a sunny day as opposed to a happy tune that expresses someone coming along and showing kindness? You see, there's more to creating music than just having the happiness and sorrow (i.e. the major and minor scales). You must choose the proper notes and rests for your melodies as well. For example, the Super Mario theme song is in the key of C major since it's a cheerful theme.

But, how did the creator of the theme (Koji Kondo) know what notes and rests to choose for the theme so that it conveys what he wanted it to convey? I admit, it's a catchy theme and it's his choice of notes and rests that made it so great and catchy. I know I said earlier that we can naturally create such great, catchy tunes and themes in our heads. But, just in case my tunes really are rubbish even when they're fully crafted, then I need to know how to choose a series of notes and rests to convey what I want to convey and to make my melodies great.

Other Person's Response: Here's my personal view. You don't learn how to choose a series of notes and rests that convey whatever it is you want to convey. You just learn the technical aspects behind music because that's all music theory can teach you is the techniques. From there, you utilize those techniques to create whatever melody or theme you want to create.

So, creating great music all boils down to your mindset and if you have talent or not. Lame people will end up creating lame music even though they utilize the techniques they've learned. Think of the lame music you hear on the radio. But, you're saying you're more than some lame, average, joe, and that the music you're creating in your head is great?

My Reply: Which means you're basically saying what I've been saying all along which is that creating great music in our minds is a natural ability and isn't something we learn how to do through education? As for your question, I do think I'm creating great music in my head. But, in the event that I'm not, then that's why I'm asking how to do that. One might say to just live and be myself. But, how's that any advice? How's that supposed to help me create the music that conveys what I want to convey?

Other Person's Response: I don't understand why you're asking that question in the first place. The answer is quite simple. If you want to create, for example, a painting that conveys something mystical after having learned the techniques of how to paint, then you'd just paint some fairies, rainbows, glitter, etc.

My Reply: It's a completely different scenario than that. Yes, if I learned the techniques of how to paint, then it would be quite obvious to me what I'm supposed to paint in order to convey the meaning and emotion I want to convey. But, when it comes to making music, I'd have no idea what series of notes and rests I'm supposed to choose to convey what I want to convey. It wouldn't be obvious to me. I'd just be choosing a series of notes and rests I think conveys the power and meaning I describe when it really doesn't. Hopefully though, I am choosing a series of notes and rests in my mind that make my melodies great and convey what I describe.

Other Person's Response: Maybe you should be a painter rather than a composer.

My Reply: Composing is what I want to do and I have no interest in any other field of art. Music is very profound to me and means so much to me. That's why I want to make some good music.

Other Person's Response: Personally, I think you are one of those lame, untalented people. You're not creating any good melodies. As a matter of fact, you're worse than that because your melodies are meaningless rubbish while lame music conveys some meaningful message.

My Reply: If my melodies really are rubbish when they become fully crafted and you were right all along, I'd like to know the scientific explanation as to why I'm without that ability to create great music while so many other people have it. Why can others create music that conveys meaning and scenes while I can't?

Perhaps knowing the science behind this will help me develop this ability. I have some very profound and powerful emotions within myself I wish to express through music and there'd be this big barrier preventing me from doing that. Such a barrier needs to be removed somehow. I'd need to know exactly what I need to do, what I need to experience, and what knowledge I need to gain to remove said barrier.

Other Person's Response: To be honest, I think you should just give up composing. You don't have what it takes to create the good, catchy tunes you want to create. In addition, you should also give up on any greater values because you don't have what it takes here either. So, you should stick with whatever previous hobby you were good at and you should stick with your basic, emotional based values.

My Reply: Here's what I'm going to do. I'm going to learn what I need to learn to fully craft my melodies. If people tell me they do convey what I describe and that they're great, then that would be awesome. That says I really had a talent all along people didn't realize. But, if I realize they were rubbish when I fully craft them, then I'll do whatever I need to do to create the good music I want to create.

If nothing works, then I'm officially done with composing and I'll go back to my previous hobby (which was playing video games). I've always been good at playing video games. As for my value system, if I ever lose my positive emotions and can't sufficiently or fully regain them, then I'll do my best to change my value system. I can't promise anything though.

Other Person's Response: The value system you live by is **** and your music is ****! Some life! Some talent!

My Reply: That's just your opinion. I have my own personal views and I often times find myself disagreeing with a lot of people.

Other Person's Response: I have no answer for what notes and rests you're supposed to choose to convey what you want to convey. That's something that can't be taught. It's just called being an artist. If you really don't know how to do that and you just think you know, then I think you lack life experience. When you go out into the world and experience more, then you'll know how to create music that truly moves, inspires, and motivates people. You will know how to create the music you want to create.

My Reply: This doesn't really make sense to me. What exactly is it I'm supposed to be learning or experiencing besides going on youtube and learning music lessons? Furthermore, how would this help me know the notes and rests I'm supposed to choose to convey the power and meaning I want to convey?

I'm just not seeing the connection here. If you're implying that I need to learn more things about music in the real world that I can't learn on youtube or from other online sources, then it would make sense to me. But, if all you're telling me is that I need to go out into the world more and experience more, then that makes no sense to me.

Other Person's Response: Do you plan on sharing your music to others?

My Reply: Yes. When I'm able to finally create good music in the physical world, I plan on featuring it on youtube and soundcloud. I also wish to share it with my friends and family. In addition, I'd also go on music forums and share it there, too. My whole goal here is to create good music that makes me feel positive emotions. Remember, my positive emotions are what make the moment something beautiful, special, and joyful in my life.

I also need my positive emotions to be positively motivated and inspired to compose. Otherwise, it's not worth bothering. Lastly, me having my music praised and recognized would also bring me positive emotions and that's my main goal, too. I certainly wouldn't want to compose all alone since I think I'd find myself giving up. That's why I need to share it with others.

It's fine if my music doesn't become famous because I'm not expecting to be famous or rich. I just want to share my music to as many people as possible because that would stroke my ego which would allow me to feel positive emotions from their praise and recognition of my music.

That would get me all pumped up and high which would make the moment something amazing and joyful. Consider it a moment of victory and celebration for me. But, like I said before, if my music isn't good and doesn't get praised and recognized, then that's fine. I'll improve so I can create good music and, hopefully, find a way to get it out there in the world so it can get the praise and recognition it deserves.

Other Person's Response: Composing only to seek praise and recognition of your music is shallow and being a hedonist is shallow, too.

My Reply: Shallowness is all subjective. What one person sees as shallow another might see as something profound and great. I see composing for the praise and recognition of my music as not shallow because getting my awesome music out there into the world would make my music and artistic talent known.

Me composing just for the sake of composing and nothing more is shallow because I'd never achieve my goal of creating the awesome, profound music I want to create and having it known to the world. I have some unique, bizarre music I plan on sharing and people would never get to know my unique style of music I compose.

Some people might say some of my music is possessed or demonic and shy away from it. But I think it would be some very interesting music, nonetheless. I have yet to become a skilled composer to convey these themes. As for being a hedonist, again, I don't see that as shallow either because I think positive emotions are like the holy inner light within us that we need.

Other Person's Response: Could you give me more insight into the music you plan on making? You said you plan on making bizarre music to share to the world and that this music might sound demon-possessed. I'd like to hear more about this.

My Reply: I could also simply describe the music I plan on making as awesome and otherworldly. That's the style of music I wish to create and that's what I wish to express to the audience. My username is Transcended Dimensions and you can see the avatar setup I've chosen on my youtube and soundcloud account. Said username and avatar expresses the music I wish to create.

Other Person's Response: I know you're just sharing crap tunes for now and that you're trying to express different scenes right now such as love (your Wedding Tune) or beauty (your Beautiful Tune).

My Reply: Yes. I'm just expressing these scenes for now. Later on, I plan on creating awesome, otherworldly music.

Other Person's Response: What type of awesome, otherworldly music do you wish to create? Would it be classical music or the type of music you hear in horror movies?

My Reply: I'll give you an example. It would be awesome, otherworldly, divine, psychic/supernatural heavy metal. It would have a very dark, heavy, powerful, bizarre, and dramatic personality. When I say dramatic, I don't mean sad, tragic, angry, or morbid. I mean something that has a lot of awesome emotion to it. I guess you could call that "epic and astonishing" rather than "dramatic." If you ever listened to the Ginyu Transformation theme from the anime Dragon Ball Z, then this would be an example of epic and astonishing. You can listen to the theme on youtube. Here's the link to it:

https://youtu.be/Es9Fk6v5n-0

Other Person's Response: Would there also be awesome, otherworldly, divine, psychic/supernatural, heavenly music?

My Reply: Yes. I'd create that music as well. It would be something bizarre, too.

Other Person's Response: The very fact you wish to compose this style of music means you're an awesome individual. You're more than those shallow types of people who just wish to compose the same old, lame music we hear on the radio. Even if you don't have the talent to ever produce such awesome music, you'd still be an awesome, profound individual for even wanting to produce this style of music.

My Reply: Thank you.

Other Person's Response: I'll admit, you do have an awesome, musical vision, and you do have some awesome, musical ideas. But, the music you're creating is ****! Maybe you're better off creating musical ideas rather than actual music. You can share your ideas to skilled composers and maybe they can make a song, melody, or theme for you.

My Reply: Hopefully, I will be able to create some awesome music. Even if other skilled composers did create music for me, I don't think it would turn out how I wanted it to turn out. That's because I have my own vision of what it is I wish to convey. Each person has their own, unique vision, and one person's vision won't be exactly the same as someone else's. That's why no other composer can create the exact music I want. Actually, it could happen if I get lucky. But, for the most part, that doesn't happen.

Other Person's Response: When you say you wish to create awesome, otherworldly music, I think you're setting yourself a goal you can't achieve. You're just no good at composing. So, you might as well delete those awesome Transcended Dimensions accounts because you can never claim the great, almighty status your username and avatar expresses. Deleting these accounts would also delete all the rubbish tunes on those accounts. Personally, I think it's a joke to have this username and avatar setup, just to upload rubbish tunes onto these accounts. Why not do something better with your life than wasting your time, showing off your lack of talent? Just do a different hobby.

My Reply: I'm keeping those accounts intact just in case I end up creating some awesome music later on.

Other Person's Response: Not only do you have no musical talent, you also amount to nothing as a human being.

My Reply: How you think determines what type of person you are. I do have profoundly awesome, beautiful, powerful thoughts that make me feel powerful, positive emotions. That, right there, already says I'm an awesome, beautiful, profound, powerful person. It's such a shame I can't express these emotions through music. I need the talent to express that and I don't have it.

Other Person's Response: Going back to what you said earlier, I see what you mean when you say shallowness is all subjective. Spiritual believers would say it would be a shallow existence if this was the only life we had. That's because we'd just be biological machines, living in a universe of pure luck and chance. Once we die, that's it. But, at the same time, people who are convinced this is the only life would say that's not a shallow or meaningless existence. They'd say it's a profoundly beautiful existence since we only have one life and we should make the best of it.

My Reply: Yes. As for my views regarding the afterlife, I think it would be a shallow existence if this was the only life we had. According to my view, living an eternally blissful life, where we get whatever we desire, would be the most profoundly beautiful existence. That's because such a life would offer us the greatest amount of positive emotions.

The more positive emotions you have, the more beauty, greatness, joy, and worth your life has. So, an eternally blissful life would be the far more meaningful existence. For those who don't agree positive emotions are the source of beauty and worth, I could instead say the same thing about positive thoughts.

The more positive thoughts we have, the more positive experience we have in life. Thus, the more beauty, love, joy, and worth our lives would have. Since an eternal life of positive thoughts would offer us the greatest degree of positive experiences, then that would be the greatest life we could live. Living a short, finite life only gives us so much positive experiences we can have.

Think of it this way. If a baby was born into this world and had only 1 week's worth of beauty, love, and greatness in his life before he died of an illness, then that's not very much. The baby would die and that's it. But, if the baby got to live an eternal paradise after his physical body died, then he'd have an eternal amount of beauty, love, greatness, joy, and worth in his life.

Other Person's Response: I agree. If there's a life that would hold the greatest amount of beauty, goodness, joy, and worth, then that's the better life to live. That's the more meaningful existence.

My Reply: Yes. That's why I think there should be an eternal afterlife of our dreams. If it doesn't exist and this is the only life we have, then scientists should really work on trying to make us immortal.

Other Person's Response: If life just went on and on, then it would be a life that holds less beauty and worth, even if said life was a paradise.

My Reply: It's still possible to have the most profoundly beautiful thoughts regarding a life that drags on and on. Therefore, even an eternal blissful life can still be the most profoundly beautiful and worthwhile existence for you. I know it would for me. So, I disagree with your statement.

Other Person's Response: If you had some fatal condition right now and the doctor told you that you only had a few weeks to live, would you give up composing?

My Reply: I'm afraid so. There's no way I can achieve my goal within such a short time period. Since I can only compose just for the sake of composing, then I'd give up. That's another reason why I've bought these Immortality Rings because they are said to keep your body healthy and alive by preventing diseases and stopping aging. If these rings work, then they would allow me to fully go through with my goal.

That is, if some fatal accident doesn't happen to me because the rings won't protect me from that. Also, even if I did manage to achieve my goal, but my music got little to no praise, then I'd give up, too. This is because I wouldn't be creating any good music and, thus, I would see it as being pointless to pursue composing any further. If I try and try to improve, but my music is never that great, then I'd officially give up composing.

Other Person's Response: So, your only goal in composing is to hog all the glory and attention and feel good from that? That makes you a leeching bastard! I'm sorry, but that's plain selfish! If you really do have an autistic gift that has yet to be conveyed to the world, that gift can be used for something better than what you intend to use it for.

My Reply: I'll take what I want in life and I don't care what anyone's attitude or opinion is! Like I said, only my own views and opinions matter to me. I see nothing wrong with seeking praise and recognition of my music. As I said before, I don't care about the standards of others and only my own standards matter to me.

According to the standards of others, I wouldn't be a decent human being and I would be composing for a wrong, selfish purpose. But, according to my standard, I'm a decent human being and me seeking praise and recognition of my music would be nothing wrong.

Other Person's Response: Why must you share your works to others? A field of art can be appreciated just as it is. You can make music simply because you want to do it. I make artistic crafts because it means something to me. If my works get shared to the world, then that's just a bonus. It's not my main reason for making crafts. That's why it doesn't bother me if my works never get shared to the world.

My Reply: The whole point of expressing yourself through art is to express yourself to others. Imagine if there was a very cool, awesome dude and he had some awesome attributes such as cool clothes, a cool personality, etc. If he lived a solitary life, then he'd never get the chance to express these attributes to others. Thus, his cool attributes would never be known to the world. That's why he needs to meet people and express himself to others.

I realize there are cool attributes about me that I could express to others. But, there's something greater within me that I have yet to express to the world. I have some awesome, profound, and powerful emotions to express to others through music. It's my mission that I achieve this goal. I don't want said greatness to be confined. I want it expressed to the world. Once people realize said greatness, they should be astonished.

Other Person's Response: Do you express your cool attributes to the world? If not, then why be concerned about expressing yourself musically to the world? Why not compose for its own sake?

My Reply: I'm not concerned about expressing my attributes such as the clothes I wear and how I behave. This is because I'm not concerned about that. Those are personal things to me and I don't care if the world praises and recognizes them or not. It would be like how a person doesn't care if his preferences are shared to the world.

But, there's one thing I wish to express to the world and that would be my music. If I create awesome music, that would definitely be worth sharing. But, things such as the clothes I wear and how I behave are basic things that I don't care about sharing to others. Besides, there are emotions that I can only express through art that I can't express as an individual.

Other Person's Response: I really think you need to appreciate composing for its own sake rather than composing to get what you want out of it.

My Reply: When people manufacture products, they don't make products just to make them. They do it to make an awesome product that's promising to the customers. Some people make awful products that don't work and some people make products just to make them. But, that's beside the point. The point I'm trying to make here is that, if I'm going to make some music, then it has to be awesome music that delivers to the audience. It must be known, praised, and given good ratings. I'm not going to make music just to make music.

Other Person's Response: I know there are people out there who can't appreciate good products. So, even if you do make some awesome music later on, some people might not appreciate it.

My Reply: I agree. Not everyone is going to think a given melody, theme, or song is great. Likewise, there are some great products out there and not everyone's going to think said products are great.

Other Person's Response: When creating music for the audience to listen to, don't stop at any given point in the crafting process, say your music is good enough, and that the audience just needs to lower their standards so they can appreciate it. Make sure you create a fully crafted melody, theme, or song that delivers.

My Reply: Sure. But, as long as I create an awesome melody, theme, or song, and its power and greatness has been successfully conveyed, then the audience should appreciate that. If further improvements are needed, then the audience should kindly point them out, rather than dismissing and not appreciating the power and greatness that's already there. Just because a work of art needs some improvement doesn't mean it's not a good, beautiful, or great work of art, and that it holds very little to no profound meaning. It would simply be a great work of art that needs some improvement to make it even more great.

So, when people witness great works of art that need some improvement, they should praise these works while, at the same time, offering constructive criticism. Just offering constructive criticism without the praise isn't fair. Saying the work of art isn't good because it needs improvement just isn't fair. But, offering nothing but praise for a work of art without any constructive criticism just isn't fair either. So, you should offer both praise (if the artwork is deserving of it) and constructive criticism (if the artwork needs it).

However, there are works of art that don't need any constructive criticism because they're at their peak of perfection. For these works of art, we'd just give them praise. But, there are some people who wouldn't like these works of art because it's just not their style. For example, some people wouldn't like Beethoven's music. That's alright because different people will have different styles of music, drawings, paintings, etc. they prefer. Then there are works of art that deserve constructive criticism, but are unworthy of any praise. An example of these types of artwork would be tunes plucked out, on a keyboard, by a baby.

Other Person's Response: So, you'd actually have 2 main goals when it comes to composing:

1.) To produce some awesome music and have it known and praised.

2.) To feel happiness and joy in pursuing #1 and achieving #1.

My Reply: Correct. #1 without #2 would be a worthless endeavor. But, even if I could feel happiness and joy in the absence of #1, I still wouldn't bother composing because I wouldn't be able to create good music and have it known and praised by the world. That's why a combination of #1 and #2 is needed.

Other Person's Response: Honestly, achieving your goals shouldn't really matter because, once you die, that's it. Your compositions will never become legend and they'll be forgotten.

My Reply: Well, this might not be the only life and there might be some grand purpose or meaning to life. That being the case, achieving my goals would matter. This would mean my works wouldn't just waste away. Now, if I did learn that this was the only life, then achieving my goals would still matter to me. It wouldn't matter to me as much though. Why would it still matter to me? Because I still wish to achieve goals anyway. I bet Stephen Hawking's goals or Beethoven's goals would still matter to them even if they were convinced this was the only life they had.

Other Person's Response: Why go through all the trouble of trying to compose awesome music? Why not just wait until your soul goes to the afterlife? You would then be bestowed with the ability to magically and instantly transform your emotions into music for other souls to listen to.

My Reply: This could be the only life though. There might be no soul or afterlife. In which case, I must live the longest life I can here on Earth and I must compose awesome music the hard way through education and training. I have purchased Immortality Rings and I hope they work to make me live a long, Earthly life.

Other Person's Response: If you can never create any good music and you officially give up composing, what hobby will you pursue next?

My Reply: I will go back to my video gaming hobby since I've always been good at playing video games.

Other Person's Response: What if it turns out these tunes you are hearing in your mind really are as great as you say they are?

My Reply: Since my claim that these tunes I'm hearing in my mind were great tunes was a true claim I was making all along, then other people should really keep an open mind to my other claim which was that positive emotions are the only beautiful things in life since they are the only value judgments of good, beauty, greatness, and joy.

As I said before, I have autism and autistic people have great insight into themselves and their own personal experience. Many discover new ideas that humanity was blind to and in denial of. If you don't believe I have autism, then go ask my mother and she will tell you.

Other Person's Response: Do you wish to be a performer?

My Reply: No. I have a keyboard and all I want to do is use it to figure out these notes I'm hearing in my head. I do not plan on performing my music or any other type of music. I figure out the notes on the keyboard and place them on a music notation software. From there, I would use music producing software to choose better instruments for them.

Other Person's Response: What do you mean when you say other people can't understand your melodies? I understood the series of notes of your tunes just fine.

My Reply: When I say other people can't understand my melodies, I don't mean they can't understand the series of notes I'm playing. I mean they can't understand the power and meaning these melodies of mine convey. For example, if I just had a powerful tune from any given song, then people wouldn't be able to realize the power and meaning the tune conveys without the things necessary to successfully convey the tune's power and meaning.

All they'd understand would be the series of notes being played. My point is, I think the actual melodies themselves are there. But I just need more things to go along with these melodies (the proper chords, beat, and more) to convey their power and meaning. I'm not exactly sure at what point a melody's power, greatness, catchiness, and meaning will be successfully conveyed to the audience during the crafting process. All I know is that I need to fully craft my melodies.

Other Person's Response: So, you're saying that, since your melodies aren't fully crafted, people will see them as meaningless tunes?

My Reply: Correct. A meaningless tune would be like listening to a child pluck out keys on the keyboard or a certain instrument. It would just sound like a series of notes being played and nothing more. It would be rubbish for others listening to it.

Other Person's Response: Why aren't your melodies fully crafted then?

My Reply: I mainly hear the melodies themselves in my head and I just wanted to share that. But, I'll go on youtube and learn the things needed to fully craft them. I'll learn about chords, harmony, etc.
Other Person's Response: I know the lyrics you've added to your Wedding Tune convey meaning.

My Reply: Even though they're not the best lyrics in the world, they do convey meaning. But, I'm talking about the melodies themselves because they won't convey any power, greatness, and meaning in their current state.

Other Person's Response: What if people do get some sort of meaning from your tunes as they are now?

My Reply: I don't think it would be the meaning I intended to convey. If an artist creates a melody that's not fully crafted and just leaves it out there for the audience to listen to, then that makes the melody open to a wide variety of interpretations.

For example, one person might envision the melody differently than another person. That's why the artist must fully craft the melody to convey his/her own personal vision. That way, the audience will know exactly what the artist was trying to convey all along.

Other Person's Response: What if you described one of your melodies a certain way and someone who listened to it got that same power/meaning from it even though it's not a fully crafted melody?

My Reply: It still wouldn't be the exact power/meaning I intended to convey because, like I said, as long as my melodies aren't fully crafted, then that still leaves them open to a wide variety of interpretations. Also, if someone said one of my melodies is alright or mediocre, even though I claimed it was an awesome melody, that's because I haven't conveyed the power and greatness of said melody to that listener.

Other Person's Response: When you talk about conveying the power and greatness of your melodies, you're talking about the ones in your mind, accurately reproduced, right? Because you said earlier that you might not be accurately reproducing what you hear in your head right now. So, you're not talking about the melodies you've presented in this packet since they're poorly reproduced?

My Reply: That's correct. But, who knows, maybe I did accurately reproduce some of the tunes I hear in my head.

Other Person's Response: Why do you think your tunes would convey power and meaning once they're fully crafted?

My Reply: I'll give you an example. The Super Mario theme song is written in the key of C Major. If Koji Kondo (the creator of the theme) has chosen random white keys for the theme, then it would be a theme that conveys no power and no meaning. It would just be white keys all over the place. The same thing applies if he has chosen random notes and rests for all his other pieces.

These pieces would no longer be that awesome Zelda theme many fans love, that awesome Metroid theme, etc. Even if these randomly chosen notes and rests adhered to the rules of music theory, they wouldn't be awesome, meaningful, catchy themes. My point is, I think I'm choosing a series of notes and rests that make my melodies great. I think my Distant Future tune is the best one and it has a lot of power to it. People don't realize this yet since it's not a fully crafted melody.

Other Person's Response: It seems to me you're only fooling yourself here. You're not making any good choice of notes and rests. I think your melodies are still rubbish. You're not artistic. You're autistic and you're incapable of creating a good melody.

My Reply: Since I can choose a series of acts, gestures, and tones that convey power, greatness, and meaning to my family and to other people, then I can obviously choose a series of notes and rests in my head that convey power, greatness, and meaning. Therefore, I think I'm clearly capable of naturally creating a good melody in my mind.

Other Person's Response: Personally, I still think your tunes would be meaningless rubbish, even when they're fully crafted.

My Reply: There's this one guy who created a song based off of one of my melodies. It was my Dramatic Tune. I will first present the song and then the links to that Dramatic Tune:

https://www.bandlab.com/msmcleod/mymusicisgoodenough-masterwav-7ae87?revId=89498e6b-9fbb-e811-af11-00155d60cb1b

Youtube Link:

https://youtu.be/Y5tW_I2hWdE

Soundcloud Link:

https://soundcloud.com/user-432115982/dramaticforce

As you can see, in that song he made, my melody did become something meaningful. It conveyed something and wasn't just meaningless rubbish. But, he created the melody in his own vision. That means it doesn't have the dramatic power nor the power/greatness I intended. Still, the very fact the melody conveys something must mean my melodies aren't meaningless rubbish. The guy told me that context is very important when making a melody.

He put my melody within the context of a song when he made his song. So, not only must I fully craft my melodies, but I must also put them within the context of a full theme or song. That way, they can convey power, greatness, and meaning to the audience. Sometimes, melodies, by themselves, do convey meaning and greatness to the audience. An example would be the McDonald's I'm Lovin' It tune. But, maybe my melodies need the context of a full theme or song.

Other Person's Response: The series of notes and rests of your melodies ARE random and, thus, convey no power and meaning.

My Reply: When creating a melody, you can choose any series of notes and rests you want as long as said notes and rests adhere to the rules of music theory. Some choices of notes and rests, even though they adhere to the rules of music theory, just seem like rubbish tunes that don't convey anything meaningful to the audience.

Even when said melodies become fully crafted, they'd still be rubbish melodies. But then there are choices of notes and rests that make great, catchy melodies. I don't think I'm the type of person creating rubbish melodies. I really think I'm making great, catchy melodies. Imagine a lame melody created by a novice as opposed to a great melody created by a true, composing artist.

Other Person's Response: What are these rules of music theory that you talk about which need to be followed?

My Reply: An example would be having the proper amount of notes in a bar, raising the 7th note in the harmonic, minor scale, not creating rests that cover both a weak beat and then a medium beat, etc.

Other Person's Response: I realize some of your melodies are just the melodies themselves without any chords or anything else. If they really are great melodies, then they should sound great and meaningful on their own, even without the accompanying chords, beat, harmony, etc. So, if people say they're awful, then that already means they're awful.

My Reply: I'm not sure if great melodies can sound great and meaningful on their own. They might still sound like musical nonsense. Even if they did sound great on their own to people, these people might be having their own vision in regards to the melody. In other words, the great melody might really sound like meaningless rubbish on its own and people are imagining a fully crafted version of it. It's this imagined, fully crafted version that does convey greatness, power, and meaning. So, when I say my melodies are great and convey certain scenes, that would be my own vision that I have to convey to the audience. I'm imagining what my melodies would be like in their complete form and that's what I have to convey to the audience.

Other Person's Response: Then why can't other people create their own vision in regards to your melodies and see them as great?

My Reply: It's because some people don't have the ability to create their own vision. Thus, they'll hear my melodies for what they really are at this stage: musical nonsense.

Other Person's Response: When a person looks at a great melody that doesn't have any chords or anything else to it, it can still be recognized as a great melody. A person can look at the structure of it and other technical details about it and conclude if it's a great melody or not.

My Reply: Sure. But, if someone listens to the melody and doesn't create their own vision when listening to it, then I think the melody should sound like meaningless rubbish. Also, a melody can appear simple and not that great when someone looks at it on the music sheet and analyzes it. But, said melody can still be great, powerful, and meaningful when it gets fully crafted. My point is, when you look at my melodies, don't judge them as simplistic rubbish. You might find yourself quite surprised once I fully craft them by adding in all the necessary chords, harmony, etc. Only then should you hear something great.

Other Person's Response: You claim you're this mentally gifted artist who can create great music in his head. I think you're giving yourself a title or status you don't deserve. Here's where you truly rank. You rank as nothing more than a mere child coming up with rubbish melodies. You are overly confident, proud, and arrogant. But you'll be humbled to the real truth.

My Reply: I'm not sure what will happen. If it turns out my music is great once it's fully crafted, then I was right and had every reason to give myself this status. People should then take back their insults, name calling, and doubts they've had about me. But, if I was creating rubbish tunes in my head all along, then that's the truth and I'll be fine with it. I'm actually prepared for such truth.

Other Person's Response: You say these melodies will convey power, greatness, and meaning once they're fully crafted. I don't think they will. Human beings are meaningful creatures and we attribute meaning to things that have no meaning. For example, what's the meaning of life? It has no meaning. People just give meaning to it.

My Reply: Well, to me, this meaning seems absolutely real and compelling. People can attribute meaning to things and be right in their assessments while, other times, they're wrong. I don't know if I'm right or wrong in my assessments. I just go by my own personal judgments. I judge my melodies based on what I personally think they convey.

Other Person's Response: You're sending yourself on a wild goose chase. You think there's power and meaning these melodies have that you need to convey to the audience and there's none. You should give up composing right now and pursue a different hobby.

My Reply: I don't agree with you and I'm going through with this regardless of what others say. After all, people who don't listen to the opinions of others were often times very successful artists and inventors. People would have doubts, name call, and mistreat these artists and inventors. But that didn't stop them.

Besides, I'm someone who doesn't listen to the opinions of others anyway. The only things I listen to are important information I need to know or things I need to learn and study such as music theory. I don't bother with the opinions of others who say I'm a **** person, I'm a sinner, my music will be **** even when fully crafted, etc.

Other Person's Response: You take pride in things that are nothing to be proud of. Your music isn't anything to be proud of.

My Reply: I think it is and people will realize this later on.

Other Person's Response: I heard you sometimes have a difficult time getting the notes right to these melodies you hear in your head. Why is that?

My Reply: First of all, it takes practice to reproduce the exact notes you hear in your head. But I do think I got the exact notes and rests to my melodies. Second, when I'm very focused and determined to reproduce the right notes on a keyboard, that actually hinders my ability to see if I've chosen the right notes or not. This is because you need to have a relaxed mind to think clearly and see things clearly.

Otherwise, your mind will be muddled up. So, let's pretend I was a remixer, trying to adjust the volumes of the tracks to the right level. I'd have to keep my mind relaxed to clearly see what the right volume would be for these tracks. If I had that overly fixated mindset, I'd have the tracks near the right volume level. But not exactly the right level.

The same idea applies when reproducing the notes to these melodies in my mind. I might mess up and get some notes that are slightly off. But there is a trick that allows me to get the notes right when I'm in that fixated mindset. My mind is overly fixated on getting the notes right to the forward version of my melodies which leaves my mind settled in regards to the reversed version.

So, that makes it much easier for me to see what notes are off in the reversed version. I reverse my melodies and listen to them. If I hear a note that's off, then I'll know which note was off in the forward version. When I do get all the notes right to my melodies, that makes a melody that fully conveys its intended meaning with no "off"-sounding notes that sort of distort said meaning. Again, only I can see the meaning my melodies have at this stage.

Other Person's Response: Maybe you can't see the rubbish your melodies really are since your mind isn't relaxed.

My Reply: That's not true. Even when I'm relaxed, I still think my melodies are great and convey what I describe. I have always seen them this way.

Other Person's Response: I notice your Distant Future melody is supposed to either be in the key of Bb minor or Db major. But you're not starting on the tonal key (Bb or Db) and ending on that key. You also naturalize the E note.

My Reply: I basically create melodies through inspiration alone and I don't limit myself to factors such as creating a melody that doesn't have too many leaps or steps (i.e. too many big or small melodic intervals), starting on the tonal key and ending on that key, etc. I don't think those factors always have to be necessary because you can still create great music and melodies through inspiration alone.

Think of it this way. Imagine if I told someone to sing the phrase: "I went to the store today." If that person was inspired to sing it, he'd just sing it through pure emotion. He wouldn't even think about those factors I've mentioned. Even though the melody was sung through inspiration alone, it might be a great, catchy melody he has yet to fully craft so that said greatness and catchiness becomes realized by the audience.

Other Person's Response: The problem with you is that you think you can create great music in your head through pure emotion alone without thinking about anything. Some thought is necessary when creating a good melody. You must think about the technical aspects to create a good melody in your mind.

My Reply: I don't think that's the case. I think pure emotion/inspiration alone can result in the creation of great music in our minds. I'd like to use an interesting analogy and it would be a Dragon Ball Super analogy. If you've never watched the anime, that's fine. I just want to share it anyway. There's a character named Goku who uses Ultra Instinct.

It's an ability where he doesn't think at all and his pure instinct allows him to be an amazing fighter. I think we as human beings have our own little ultra instinct and we can become great artists in our own minds. We don't need to put any thought into creating amazing artwork in our minds. We just let the inspiration do all the work.

Other Person's Response: So, you think the only thought that's actually needed to create good melodies is when you're going through the whole crafting process of figuring out what chords you need and things like this?

My Reply: Yes. Your brain can start you off with some awesome music. From there, you need to figure out the rest when fully crafting your mentally inspired music.

Other Person's Response: You say a person can sing a great melody naturally on his own, having no knowledge and experience in the art of music. I don't believe this.

My Reply: Ask any normal person who knows nothing about music theory to expressively sing or say the phrase: "You will be my best friend forever and ever!" I bet that person would say or sing it in such a way that it becomes a good, catchy melody. Of course, if this person was an awful singer, he wouldn't be singing the melody too well. But, if the melody the person was trying to convey were put into note form on a notation software and then made into a fully crafted melody with all the chords, harmony, etc., I bet it would turn out to be a decent melody.

My point is, creating good, catchy melodies is a natural ability. But, to say or sing a meaningless, rubbish melody, you'd just say or sing any phrase in a random manner, where the words of that given phrase are still being said/sung, but the notes are all over the place which makes it sound like an odd, meaningless, melody. It would be like a person who displays gestures and expressions that convey meaning as opposed to someone who displays odd, random, meaningless gestures and expressions.

The thing is, human beings are naturals at conveying meaning. So, of course their gestures and expressions are going to convey meaning and of course the melodies these people come up with are going to convey meaning. However, some people might come up with lame melodies that aren't that great while others do come up with awesome melodies.

Therefore, even though melodies or songs do convey meaning, that doesn't mean it's going to be a great melody or song. Think of lame music you hear on the radio. Sure, it conveys meaning. But it's lame music. There might also be some people who come up melodies that are meaningless rubbish even when they become fully crafted melodies. These would be those random melodies I was talking about.

Other Person's Response: I get it now. People do naturally create melodies that convey meaning and some of these melodies are lame while others are great. What types of people naturally create great melodies and what types create lame ones?

My Reply: If you're a very boring, lame person, then you're very likely to come up with a lame melody. But, if there's some unique and awesome musical inspiration within you that goes beyond that of some lame musician, then you're very likely to come up with great, unique melodies or songs. I think I'm that person coming up with great melodies and I wish to share them to the world in their fully crafted form.

Other Person's Response: Your Distant Future isn't a full theme though. I think there needs to be much more added to it.

My Reply: Perhaps that's the case. Maybe, once it becomes a full theme, it will start off on the tonal key and end on that key. The first part of the theme is supposed to express someone arriving at the distant time period or galaxy. So, the melody you hear that has a bit of rest and then goes into the full theme is supposed to be the beginning. It's supposed to have a sort of settled, bizarre feel to it. Once it gets to the main part, it has a bit more energy as it expresses the touring or the observing of this bizarre place.

Other Person's Response: I can tell your Distant Future tune has a pattern because it alternates between 2 staccato notes and 2 normal notes, the 2nd part of the melody raises and lowers back down, and there's a half rest throughout the piece.

My Reply: What's interesting is that I've created these patterns in my mind without even thinking about it. The inspiration alone has done it for me. From there, I've just replicated the notes and rests I heard in my mind onto a music notation software. If my inspiration alone can create musical patterns, then why can't it also create great music? I figure that, if I can naturally create musical patterns in my mind without thinking about it, then I can naturally create great music in my mind without thinking about it.

Other Person's Response: How would you respond if you fully craft your melodies and people still say they're awful rubbish?

My Reply: There are 2 possibilities. The 1st would be that my melodies obviously don't convey what I described at all. They really were nothing great and I was fooling myself all along. But the 2nd possibility would be that they are great, do convey what I describe, and people can't see that due to their high standards. If, for example, I fully craft my Distant Future tune, then there's power, greatness, and meaning staring these people right in front of their faces and they can't even see it.

They lack appreciation and that's what blinds them. They expect too much when it comes to artwork. There's a big difference between how complex an artwork is and the power, meaning, and greatness conveyed by an artwork. Just because my fully crafted Distant Future melody isn't a more complicated melody, is predictable, and repeats, doesn't mean it's a rubbish melody that conveys no meaning.

I think people are having too high of a standard and that blinds them to the power and greatness of artwork. Even simple art forms such as the drawing of a beautiful rose can convey power and meaning. It doesn't have to be a rose with complex detail for it to be something great. My point is, a work of art can qualify as something great, powerful, and meaningful even when it's not the complex work of an artistic mastermind.

Other Person's Response: So, if you do fully craft your melodies and people still say they're rubbish, you're just going to blame and insult the audience for not liking them? You're going to blame and insult others for your incapabilities?

My Reply: Well, the question to ask here is if such blame is justified. If it's justified, then my fully crafted melodies really are great and other people can't appreciate them. If it's not justified, then I'm the one to blame since I'm really not creating any good music.

Other Person's Response: You can't go on about 'power, greatness & meaning' (something you seem obsessed by) until you finally finish something. Even then, you have to leave it to others to determine whether your work has any merit or not. That's for the audience to decide. Not you. Finish what you started. A half-baked idea is no good to anyone. You have to see it through and that takes work. Lots of it.

You say that this melody is great and has lots of potential. Then you talk about 'if you decide to finish it'. Surely, if you think it has lots of potential, then you would finish it??!!?? Talk is cheap. Actions speak louder than words. I can't comment on the music until I hear the finished product.

'They lack appreciation and that's what blinds them' ??!!?? You're wrong here. They appreciate good music and that's what makes them decide what's good and what's not. If someone doesn't like your music, that doesn't automatically mean they lack appreciation.

In fact, quite the opposite. It means they are discerning. If someone likes your music, they like it. Pure and simple. If they don't, they don't. That's life. Stop talking up your music and finish something. Then let the audience decide and LISTEN when they respond.

My Reply: I will finish it then. I was just eager to share it now because I thought there was the possibility that people would realize the power and greatness this melody has. I see that's not the case and I must fully craft this melody so that said greatness becomes realized. Lastly, there are people who don't appreciate good music.

For example, some people would say Michael Jackson's music isn't that good because some of his melodies are too simplistic. I think they are great and some people just can't appreciate his music. Many people do appreciate his music though. The same idea applies to the Super Mario theme song. Some people would say it's dull and repetitive while I think it's great and catchy. So, the audience isn't always right and discerning as you say they are.

Other Person's Response: I heard your father is also a musician. Do you wish to compose the style of music he makes and learn from him?

My Reply: The style of music I wish to compose is something bizarre and out of the ordinary. It would be something completely different than the style he composes. That Dark Tune would be an example of one of those bizarre, out of the ordinary, tunes.

Some tunes I put up there though have a normal and beautiful vibe to them. When I learn how to make fully crafted music, I wish to add my bizarre music to videos such as Sonic the Hedgehog and other types of video games and anime.

Even though my music wouldn't fit the Sonic universe or the universe of other anime and video games, I wish to express them in my own unique way. What compels me to pursue this composing dream is I wish to express and share music that's out of the ordinary. It would render people awe-stricken and very intrigued. They will realize the awesome power of these themes.

Other Person's Response: Could you explain more in regards to that Dark Tune because I'm already intrigued?

My Reply: First of all, I'll just say this as a reminder. There is one part of this tune that's at a softer volume than the other part. That part that has the lower volume is the leading tune which is supposed to lead into the chorus. The chorus is the loud and powerful part.

It's at a lower octave while the leading tune is at a higher octave. Now, this Dark Tune isn't just a tune. It's supposed to be the bridge and chorus of a song. I'll have to create the whole song myself someday. It would be like if I just shared this part of Michael Jackson's song "Man in the Mirror:"

"'Cause they got nowhere to go

That's why I want you to know

I'm starting with the man in the mirror

I'm asking him to change his ways

And no message could have been any clearer

If you want to make the world a better place

(If you want to make the world a better place)

Take a look at yourself, and then make a change

(Take a look at yourself, and then make a change)"

Other Person's Response: So, you'd just be sharing the bridge and chorus of a dark, powerful song you'd make in the future. I take it you just wish to showcase it in the meantime until you make the full song.

My Reply: That's correct. Also, I do envision a type of singing voice that would sing this dark and powerful chorus. It would be like the voice of a powerful, dark, witch. If you listen to the woman's singing voice in this youtube video, then imagine a dark, powerful, choir version of her voice. It would sound similar to her voice, but in a dark and powerful way. It would be T'pau's voice from the song Heart and Soul. I'll go ahead and share the youtube video:

youtu.be/SwrYMWoqg5w

Other Person's Response: When you say a dark, powerful, choir version of T'pau's voice sings your chorus, are you referring to her voice in the beginning of her song "Heart and Soul?" Or are you referring to her loud, singing voice that's heard in the chorus of her song?

My Reply: I'm referring to her singing voice in the beginning of the song. So, imagine a dark, powerful version of that voice singing my chorus. When you listen to how her voice sounds in the beginning, it sounds sort of heavy. It's almost as though that voice can become the singing voice of a powerful, dark witch. But, when you listen to her singing voice during the chorus of her song, it doesn't sound like that. So, I'm not talking about the chorus of her song.

Other Person's Response: I don't see how her voice can be the singing voice of a dark witch at all!

My Reply: Then forget what I said if that's the case. All I'm trying to say here is that a woman would sing the chorus of my Dark Tune. Her singing voice would sound like a powerful, dark witch. It would sound heavy and evil.

Other Person's Response: You're 30 years old and even my own little daughter, with her little knowledge and experience in composing, can produce a better tune than you! At least her tunes convey meaning and emotion while yours are just plain rubbish! Your tunes convey no meaning and emotion whatsoever!

My Reply: I think they do and people don't realize it yet since they're not fully crafted melodies (i.e. just the bare bones laid out for others to listen to which would be the melody itself along with a few additional things). However, if you're right and they're still rubbish even when fully crafted, then I clearly don't understand how to create music that conveys meaning and emotion for others to listen to.

I think it conveys meaning and emotion, but it really doesn't. Just to me it does. I could certainly create lyrics that convey meaning/emotion and I could even yell them to give them more power. But I wouldn't know how to create a melody or song that conveys meaning and emotion. There are 2 aspects when it comes to making music and that would be the lyrics and then the actual music itself.

I'm not concerned with coming up with lyrics. I just want to create music that is powerful, awesome, beautiful, amazing, etc. to other people. I wish to express myself to others through music. If I feel a certain powerful, awesome emotion (such as a given character or scene), I wish to express that through music. I wish for the amazing power of my positive emotions to take on a musical form.

Otherwise, such amazing power would be contained only within myself and wouldn't be expressed through music I create. I could certainly act out on such emotions (such as acting out a scene or character), but I'd just be acting out and nothing more. It wouldn't really express how I'm feeling since it might give the impression I'm some crazy person.

My gestures and voice just wouldn't convey the artistic emotion I'm feeling. Therefore, I wish to express said emotions artistically and I've chosen the art of music because music is very profound and beautiful to me. I don't want to take up drawing or any other art form. I think I can somehow learn how to fully express my emotions through music.

Other Person's Response: So, you're basically saying you'd just be making music that makes sense to you, but to nobody else?

My Reply: Correct. Any fully crafted tune or song I make would be meaningless, nonsensical rubbish for others while, for me, it would convey meaning, scenes, emotion, and a story. Hopefully, that's not the case and the fully crafted music I make really does convey the meaning and emotion I describe.

Other Person's Response: If it's really the case the fully crafted music you make is meaningless rubbish for other listeners, then it seems you can't relate to your audience. You wouldn't actually know how to create music the audience would love. You'd just think you know, but don't.

My Reply: If this turns out to be the case when I fully craft my melodies, then I'm not sure how to fix this problem.

Other Person's Response: Music comes from within. If you want to create music that is powerful and awesome for others to listen to, then the music you create has to come from within. It must be inspired and not just rubbish.

My Reply: That's what I'm doing. The melodies I create in my head are created through inspiration. Some of them are created through channeling powerful emotion within myself. But that wouldn't be enough if I want to make fully crafted music that's actually great. If my fully crafted music really does turn out to be great like I said, then that would be wonderful! But I don't know if that's the truth yet.

Other Person's Response: Your melodies need more variation to them in order for them to be something good when you fully craft them. I also think they're too repetitive.

My Reply: Personally, I don't think they do and I also think they're repeated the right amount of times. You need repetition in music. But not too much. Also, I could take any great, catchy tune and make it so that it's repeated too much and so that there's not much variety to the notes when it's repeated.

It would be like it's almost the exact same tune being repeated over and over again. But it would still be a great, catchy tune. The power and meaning the fully crafted tune conveys would still be there.

But, if I completely screwed up the notes of that tune, then that power, catchiness, and meaning would no longer be there anymore since it would be a completely different tune. It would now be a meaningless, rubbish tune.

Other Person's Response: Even if your melodies were fully crafted, they're still ordinary melodies any normal person can come up with. They're nothing spectacular and they don't convey anything you describe.

My Reply: I don't think so. An ordinary melody wouldn't possess the power and greatness my melodies have. Imagine if a famous artist such as Michael Jackson came up with a simple, great melody as opposed to an average person coming up with an ordinary melody. Michael Jackson's melody would be something far greater than that ordinary melody. MJ's melody would have that power, meaning, soul, and catchiness to it. Of course, MJ's melody would need to be fully crafted and can't just be the bare bones.

Other Person's Response: Do you think you're like Michael Jackson?

My Reply: No. The point I'm trying to make is that I'm not just coming up with average melodies here. I think I have a musical gift that the world has yet to realize. Once my melodies become fully crafted, then the world will know that my melodies are something much greater than what an average person would come up with.

Other Person's Response: How much do you wish to learn when it comes to making music?

My Reply: I just want to learn what I need to learn to make the music I want to make. I don't want to learn all these additional things if they're unnecessary.

Other Person's Response: I see you're someone who wishes to express emotion through music and you're not someone intellectual such as a person who'd want to play chess or learn physics.

My Reply: Correct. Even though I'm not an intellectual genius like Einstein or an amazing chess player, I would consider myself to be an emotional genius. My fully crafted music wouldn't be great like Beethoven's or Bach's music. But I'd still consider it to be the work of an emotional genius who expresses powerful and profound emotion. You don't have to be the best composer in the world to be considered a genius. For example, I consider Koji Kondo to be a genius since he makes music that so many people love and find catchy.

Other Person's Response: You do realize there's some intellect involved when it comes to making music and that it's not all emotional? For example, you have to take into account the rules of music theory and things like this.

My Reply: I realize this and I actually enjoy the whole process (providing I have my positive emotions to allow me to enjoy it). So, I'm willing to use my intellect to achieve my goal of expressing my emotions to the audience through music. But I'm not willing to pursue intellectual endeavors for their own sake such as playing chess, doing riddles, calculus, or any other intellectual exercise.

Other Person's Response: In regards to that Dark Tune you've made (which is supposed to be the chorus of a song), are you willing to change some of the notes?

My Reply: These are the exact notes I hear in my head. Changing the notes would change the melody and I don't want to do that. Imagine if I changed the notes of some great, catchy tune out there. It would no longer be the same tune. So, I wish to keep my melody as it is and, from there, fully craft it to make it a chorus.

Other Person's Response: I think you're a boring, dull, shallow, **** person after having read all your previous packets.

My Reply: I think there are other ways to grow and be a great, interesting person. For example, I wish to compose some pretty bizarre, profound, powerful, interesting music and that would make me an interesting, awesome, profound person right there!

Other Person's Response: I'm sorry to say it, but magnetic therapy doesn't work, your music will be **** when fully crafted, and there's no afterlife. Those things you wanted to be true weren't! There's reality for you!

My Reply: I'm hoping it's the opposite. I hope these immortality rings work to reverse my aging and bring back my positive emotions if I'm ever in a situation where I lose them. I've been wearing them and I'm not noticing any effects. I'll continue to wear them though. It would be lovely if they really do work since that would allow me to live a very long life and achieve my composing dream without any illness killing me off beforehand.

In addition, I could have my happiness intact with these rings as well. From there, it would be great if the fully crafted music I make really does turn out to be awesome like I said. If I ever do die, then it would be lovely if the eternal blissful afterlife of my dreams exists for me. I don't know if the afterlife exists. So, I have to live my life here on Earth as long as possible since it could be the only life for me. I wouldn't want to die and that be the end of me.

I wish to live as long as possible and have fun, be happy, and enjoy my life all I want. I'm basically existing to live a long, happy life, have my awesome, fully crafted music praised and recognized (which would make me feel even more joy), and then to live the afterlife of my dreams when I die. If my fully crafted music really does turn out to be great, then I wish for it to be praised and recognized on internet forums as well as sites such as youtube and soundcloud.

Other Person's Response: If you fully craft your melodies, then how would you know if your music is awful or not?

My Reply: I would share my fully crafted music on internet forums and get feedback. If people say it's awful or great, then I'll know if my music is awful or great. I can't possibly know the truth on my own and that's why I must share my fully crafted music and get responses from others. I would also want to get responses from professional musicians because their views of my fully crafted music would be far closer to the truth than the responses of basic, average, people on the internet.

Other Person's Response: You do realize that even great music has people ridiculing it, right?

My Reply: Yes. But, if far more people are saying my fully crafted music is great than there are people saying it's rubbish, then that says my music is great and there are just some people out there who don't like it. But, if almost everyone says my fully crafted music is awful, then I'll know it's awful.

Other Person's Response: What about the beat of your Dark Tune? Do people also think it's rubbish?

My Reply: From my perspective, it's a very good, catchy beat that conveys power and meaning. It may not be the best beat in the world. But I still think it's good and catchy. If anyone says it's rubbish, then perhaps it's because I don't have other things to go along with that beat in order to convey its power and meaning. The same idea applies to the beat along with the melody. Or maybe other people were right all along and I just see it as good and catchy.

Other Person's Response: Even if it's the case that your melodies will become great once fully crafted, you're not making a proper beat. You don't have the right chords either. That's not how you make a beat and that's not how you make chords.

My Reply: At least the melodies themselves are there for now. Now I just need to learn how to make the right beat, chords, etc. to make them fully crafted melodies.

Other Person's Response: You said you have a memory there that allows you to realize the power and meaning your tunes have (including your Dark Tune). If that memory were to be taken away, you're saying you'd perceive your tunes like how any normal person would?

My Reply: Yes. I would also see them as crap, rubbish tunes that convey no meaning. I know this from personal experience because I did, in fact, lose memories in regards to certain tunes. This is because the brain naturally forgets. However, certain memories can become permanent (unless taken away by brain damage or any other factor).

I have brought back those memories I've forgotten because you can bring back memories you've forgotten. This means I now know what these tunes are supposed to be like in their fully crafted form. That even includes the Dark Tune. What's even better is that these memories are now permanent.

Having these memories will allow me to know how I'm supposed to craft these tunes. Since I see power and meaning in my tunes that has yet to be conveyed to the audience, this means I'll know what I need to do with these tunes to fully bring out said power and meaning. I'll know this when I learn how to fully craft a melody.

Basically, what these memories are is knowledge of the power and meaning that has yet to be conveyed by my melodies. When I lose those memories, I no longer know what power and meaning was supposed to be conveyed by these melodies and, thus, I see them as rubbish, crap tunes.

Other Person's Response: You already described the power and meaning that has yet to be conveyed by your tunes though. So, even if you did lose those memories again, shouldn't you still remember by reading your descriptions?

My Reply: I'd know what power and meaning my melodies are supposed to convey. However, that's not enough because there's a difference between having a memory from reading a description as opposed to an artistic vision that has yet to become reality. Let me give you an example. If a person wrote a very powerful melody that's not fully crafted, then he'd know the power that has yet to be conveyed by said melody since he's the one who created it.

He could even describe the power on a sheet of paper and save that sheet. He has a vision of this melody that he has yet to bring into fruition to the audience. But, if he were to lose the memory of his artistic vision of that melody, then he'd just see it as a melody and nothing more when he listens to it. Sure, he could read the description he wrote on that sheet of paper.

But that won't bring back the artistic vision he had of that melody. If he tries to bring back that memory he lost and can't bring it back, then he's going to have to create a new vision in his mind of that melody. If he doesn't create a new vision, then he'll continue to see the melody as meaningless rubbish when he listens to it. But, if he manages to bring back his former vision, then he'll see the melody as powerful and great when he listens to it.

Other Person's Response: How a person perceives music is all subjective. So, even if you do fully craft your tunes to make them understandable for other people (take, for example, that Dark Tune you said was powerful and awesome), other people might not see it as awesome or amazing. They might see it as being "ok" or just "Hey, I thought that was a bit good!"

As a matter of fact, they might even see the tune as conveying something entirely different than what you describe. This means that, for you, whatever this tune conveys in your eyes is your own personal truth/interpretation while, for others, their perception of your music is their own personal truth.

My Reply: My whole goal though in making music is to convey the things I describe. For example, if I say one of my tunes is amazing and conveys a certain powerful scene, then that's what I intend to convey. My intention is to create music that really strikes the audience.

Beethoven and Michael Jackson have achieved this because their music was powerful, moving, and profound to many people. It wasn't just the lyrics to MJ's music that moved people. It was the music itself that did.

Sure, there are some people out there who don't like their music or think their music is "ok" because not everyone is going to think a certain song is amazing and powerful. But, the fact is, their music was still powerful and amazing to many people. That's my goal is to create music that's awesome for many people.

It would be quite frustrating if I was one of the very few people (or perhaps the only person) who sees his own tunes as amazing and conveying the awesome, powerful scenes I describe. Like I said though, some of my tunes aren't that amazing. But some of them I think are. That Dark Tune being one of those awesome, powerful tunes.

Other Person's Response: Maybe that Dark Tune will become amazing, powerful, and will convey what you describe once you fully craft it. In its current stage, there's no way the tune is going to achieve its intended goal. However, even if you do fully craft it and it's said to be not that great and/or conveying something else, then maybe your assessment of your tunes is off. In other words, what you think your tunes convey and your judgment that they're awesome, powerful, and amazing would be an assessment that doesn't match up with reality.

My Reply: Again, that would be quite frustrating if it's the latter. If it's the latter, then I would somehow have to fix my way of assessing my tunes. I wish to see my tunes for what they really are rather than deluding myself into thinking they're amazing and conveying the scenes or characters I describe.

If I could know what my tunes actually convey and if they're that great or not, then that would give me a major advantage since I would know if other people would think they're awesome, great, and convey what I describe. Otherwise, I'd be all alone and and I'd be the only one who sees his music as great and conveying of certain scenes.

Other Person's Response: I agree that your assessments are off.

My Reply: Here's the thing though. I can give an accurate assessment of any given song. For example, if someone were to present to me a song or tune by Michael Jackson, I'd be able to describe the power, personality, and emotion it conveys. So, why can't I give an accurate assessment of music I create in my head? I conclude that, since I can give an accurate assessment in regards to other tunes and songs, that my assessment of these melodies in my mind is also an accurate assessment.

Other Person's Response: What about reversed songs? Do they convey certain scenes?

My Reply: Yes. When I reverse some songs, they convey certain meanings to me and are catchy. Some songs I reverse don't convey anything to me. They just sound like stuff being played backwards. Take note that I'm not talking about reversed lyrics here. I'm talking about the reversed series of notes and rests in a song and what emotion it conveys.

Most people reverse songs to make out what words they think they hear when they listen to reversed lyrics. But I reverse songs to see what emotion music conveys. I'm just concerned with the power and meaning music itself conveys. Yes, lyrics are important. But I'm just not concerned with lyrics. Anyway, I'll give you an example of how a reversed song does convey a certain emotion.

This song doesn't have lyrics to it. It's called "The Ballad of the Goddess." Even though it's the song Zelda's Lullaby played backwards, it still conveys meaning. It conveys powerful heroism such as a hero embarking on a journey. It's not just Zelda's Lullaby played backwards. It's done in such a way that the notes sound like they're playing forward rather than having notes that sound like they've been reversed. This is called "retrograding." Here's the youtube link to this song:

youtu.be/v4ReyoNpyrM

Now that you know reversed songs can convey certain emotions, I'm going to share to you a song I reversed and made my own personal story out of. It's the song "Let It Rock" reversed. Again, forget about the reversed lyrics because that's not my focus here. Instead, focus on the emotion of this reversed song and the scenes I've chosen for it. Yes, do focus on the singing because the singing involves the series of notes being sung. But just forget about the reversed lyrics.

As for the scenes I've chosen, they've been taken from a Sonic the Hedgehog video and I personally think they match the song. I slow some scenes down so the story matches with the music. When you first hear the reversed song, the vibe I get from it is something you'd hear before the chorus arrives. When you first hear songs play, it's the beginning of the song to prepare the listener for the chorus.

The chorus conveys intense emotion and the song has to lead up to that. Sonic the Hedgehog is preparing to transform into his super form in this video which is why I have that part of the song match this scene. I think this portion of the song also really does express a character preparing to transform. Not in a cinematic way. But in a very cool way since that's the vibe it conveys to me.

Then the intense part of the song (the chorus) arrives. This part, to me, conveys something awesome, powerful, and dangerous. It expresses a character going through an intense mode of unleashing power and that's why I have the scene of Sonic transforming match this part of the song. The reversed chorus is unlike the forward version because the forward version doesn't convey that emotion. The forward version makes people want to dance and have a fun time.

After Sonic transforms into his super form, I then have the next part of the song match the next scene. The next part of the song is a bit more settled down which is why I have the scene of Sonic standing in his super form match this part of the song. After that, I have the next scene match the next part of the song. The next part of the song conveys something awesome, lethal, serious, and dangerous.

It's not like the chorus because the chorus conveyed powerful emotion. The scene that's used to match this part of the song would be Super Sonic unleashing his lethal moves upon a character. So, there you have it. There's my assessment of the reversed song Let It Rock. It's not the full song reversed though. I just gave you a small example. One might say my assessment is way off and it could very well be.

If that's the case, then it would be an irrational assessment and I would have to find a way to rationally assess somehow. Or, maybe, my assessment was right all along and the notes of the reversed song have to be retrograded in order for that emotion I described to be conveyed. It could also be the case I'm envisioning the reversed song being played in a different key to convey the serious, awesome, dangerous emotion I described.

Here's the link to the Sonic video with the reversed Let It Rock song:

youtu.be/XvwSr30Vy2I

Other Person's Response: You must be a crazy person if you think that reversed Let It Rock song conveys what you described.

My Reply: Not crazy. Just irrational if my assessment is wrong. There's a big difference between someone who's crazy and someone who's using irrational assessments.

Other Person's Response: Could you give me a link that shows me the Ballad of the Goddess is Zelda's Lullaby played backwards?

My Reply: Sure. Also, I was wrong when I said the song had no lyrics:

zelda.gamepedia.com/Ballad_of_…

Other Person's Response: I found your assessment of the reversed Let It Rock to be quite interesting! Do you have another song as an example?

My Reply: Yes. It would be the song "Love Is A Battlefield" by Pat Benatar. I don't have actual video scenes to go along with it. So, I'll just describe the scenes that this reversed song conveys to me. Here's the link to it:

youtu.be/Nh3sDkLsjqw

Starting from 0:02-0:14 in this video, this would just be the intro. Then, from 0:15-0:31, this conveys something settled. It would be like something slowly creeping up. Think of a person standing there and something's about to happen. It doesn't sound cinematic like something you'd hear in a movie though. It's different than that.

Then, starting from 0:32, this is a moment of shock where the person looks and notices some demonic creature about to grab him. The tension rises as the song leads into the chorus starting from 0:40-1:17. The chorus conveys something dramatic and horrific as the person is being dragged to hell, screaming.

Again, in regards to the scenes I'm describing, don't think of anything cinematic because the emotion this reversed song conveys is entirely different than the type of emotion conveyed by cinematic music. Think of it as the song Love Is A Battlefield taking on the essence of pure horror. The same idea applies to the song Let It Rock reversed.

Think of it as that song taking on the form of something awesome and dangerous. As you can see, when you reverse songs, they take on a whole new essence since they become whole new songs. Anyway, the reversed chorus of this song conveys even more dramatic horror than famous horror music. It's in a league of its own. Pat Benatar yells while she's singing the chorus and that really adds to the dramatic horror.

Then, from 1:17-2:02, it sounds settled and ominous. Then, from 2:03-2:36, it sounds like something evil is brewing. That's all the scenes I'll describe of this song because you get the idea. If anyone disagrees with my assessment of this reversed song, then, again, maybe I'm envisioning the reversed song in a different key which would convey the scenes/emotion I described.

Other Person's Response: Here's a novel idea. Why not just listen to the songs the way they were meant to be heard?

Incidentally, the key of a piece of music does not change simply because you are playing it backwards. If, however, you change the speed it is played at, then it does. Does a movie make any sense if you watch it backwards? No. Neither does music. Stop wasting time with this reverse rubbish. Rather, invest the time listening to music naturally. It's a lot more fun and a lot more rewarding.

My Reply: I know the piece does not change key simply because you play it backwards. I said I was perhaps envisioning the song being played backwards in a different key to convey the scenes/emotion I described. I also said earlier that songs played backwards do make sense and do convey emotions and scenes. An example I gave was the Ballad of the Goddess which is actually Zelda's Lullaby reversed. As you can see, a reversed song can become a whole new song that does tell a story that makes sense.

Other Person's Response: Simply changing the key of a song doesn't mean it's going to convey the scenes you describe. Even if you did change the key of those reversed songs, it still wouldn't convey what you described.

My Reply: I realize that. I think it's a combination of what key the reversed song is in AND what the reversed series of notes and rests are. That's what will convey the scenes I described and I think the reversed series of notes/rests as they are do convey those scenes. Actually, there's another thing that's needed to convey the scenes I described and I explain it soon enough because just having a reversed song in the right key isn't enough to convey something meaningful to the audience.

Other Person's Response: Those reversed songs you've posted are meaningless and don't convey anything. They were meant to be listened to in their forward version. Since you're projecting meaning upon meaningless music, then maybe you're also projecting meaning upon meaningless, rubbish tunes you're making in your head.

Many people make certain connections with music. They connect certain emotion, power, and scenes with music they hear. Some connections make sense while others are irrational. The connection you've made with those reversed songs is irrational. The same thing applies to the connection you're making with those tunes you've created in your mind.

My Reply: I don't think that's the case.

Other Person's Response: Many human beings just aren't wired rationally. Hence the reason why you have many religious believers who believe in religious nonsense. I think the same thing applies to you because you believe this nonsense that these tunes in your head convey certain meanings and that those reversed songs you've put up convey certain scenes as well.

My Reply: I'm open-minded towards that possibility. But I don't think that's the case.

Other Person's Response: A 'song' is something that is sung with (hopefully) intelligent and meaningful lyrics. Lyrics played backwards do not become words and, therefore, cannot be a song. In fact, the whole thing just becomes a complete mess. All music has three elements - melody, harmony, and rhythm. If you distort one of these, you're just creating sonic soup that is a complete waste of time. Just because you can do things with technology doesn't mean it's worthwhile. To me, it just sounds stupid. But, hey, do whatever you want.

My Reply: I wasn't talking about the lyrics though. I was talking about the scenes music itself conveys when reversed. I mean, since the reversed Zelda's Lullaby is an actual theme in Zelda and it conveys meaning, then why can't other songs convey meaning and scenes once they're reversed?

Other Person's Response: Yes, the reversed Zelda's Lullaby does convey meaning. But I don't think those reversed songs you've pointed out do.

My Reply: If anyone has never heard the Ballad of the Goddess and simply reversed Zelda's Lullaby, they might say it's a meaningless tune that doesn't convey anything. But, once they listen to the Ballad of the Goddess, they'd say it conveys something powerful such as a hero embarking on a journey.

My point is, I think Zelda's Lullaby has not only been reversed, but recreated in such a way that it conveys something powerful and meaningful. Koji Kondo (the composer for Zelda) might've reversed the melody himself and saw the power and greatness of this reversed melody that other people couldn't see.

Thus, that's why he made it into the Ballad of the Goddess. If I never listened to the Ballad of the Goddess and I reversed Zelda's Lullaby, I might also see the power that this reversed melody conveys that other people just can't see. This is because I have an artistic mind that's able to see that.

The same thing applies to those reversed songs I've posted up there. I'm able to see the power and scenes these reversed songs convey that other people just can't see. So, I don't think reversing a song or melody is enough to convey something meaningful to the audience; you must recreate the song or melody, too.

Other Person's Response: You're basically applying the same argument you've made for your tunes in your head to those reversed songs. You're saying that you're seeing something great and awesome that other people just can't see and that you'd have to convey that to the audience.

My Reply: Correct. Not only must I find a way to convey the greatness and power of these melodies in my mind, but I'd also have to convey the greatness and power of those reversed songs, too. Otherwise, the audience would continue to remain blind and in denial to said greatness and power.

Other Person's Response: You said earlier you were blind to many truths. I think you're also blind to the fact that those reversed songs don't convey what you described at all and neither do the tunes in your head.

My Reply: I may be blind to many truths. But there are certain truths I'm not blind to. One of these truths would be that my positive emotions really are the perception/experience of beauty in my life. I know this from my own personal experience. Another truth I'm not blind to would be my claim that those reversed songs and the tunes in my head convey what I described. These are truths I know that the world is currently blind to.

Other Person's Response: If a person thinks there's a ghost, he must ask himself if there really is a ghost or if it's his imagination playing tricks on him. Likewise, when you think there's certain power and meaning to those tunes in your head and to those reversed songs, you must ask yourself if that power and meaning is actually there and has yet to be conveyed to the audience, or if it's just your imagination playing tricks on you.

My Reply: That's a good question and I find myself wondering what the real answer is.

Other Person's Response: If a person knows how reality works and learns there's no such thing as ghosts, leprechauns, or fairies, then he'll no longer think those things exist. Likewise, when you learn how music works, you'll no longer think those melodies in your mind have power and meaning to them. Neither will you think those reversed songs have power and meaning to them.

My Reply: You could be right.

Other Person's Response: You say you might have to change the key of those reversed songs so they convey what you say they convey. I think the best thing you can do is to instead change the chords because changing the key doesn't really work out too well. For example, changing the major key of a song to a minor key makes things sound a little "off."

My Reply: Maybe I'd have to do that instead.

Other Person's Response: I understand that your goal in composing is to express the things you describe because you wish to express yourself as an artist.

My Reply: Exactly. If I intend to express any given scene or character, but end up expressing something entirely different, then I'm not expressing myself to the audience. If people are getting whole new meanings/scenes from my music than what I intended to convey or if they're not getting any sort of meaning/scene at all, then I'm not achieving my goal here.

I said that Dark Tune was powerful, catchy, and conveyed deep meaning. It's supposed to convey an awesome scene of a gothic character unleashing a magnitude of energy. I hope this gets conveyed once that tune is fully crafted. At this point though, I don't think any of that will be conveyed.

Other Person's Response: Why do you lie so much?

My Reply: I don't think I'm lying. If I am, then I don't realize it. Right now, I do think these melodies I've created will convey what I describe once they're fully crafted. Whether that's a lie or not I don't know yet. The same thing applies to my philosophical packets. If all my arguments to support positive emotions being the only things that make life beautiful are lies, then I don't realize it.

Other Person's Response: You're no good at writing music because it's all ****! However, you're good at writing packets. I think you should be a writer rather than a composer. Instead of writing music, maybe you should take up writing poetry or writing stories.

My Reply: Writing isn't the hobby I wish to pursue. Composing is my passion. One might ask why I've written all this material if writing isn't my passion. Well, it's because this is all material I need to share. I wish to express my personal issues I'm having and my views/philosophies.

Other Person's Response: It requires empathy to understand what music you create is going to be awesome, great, powerful, moving, and conveying of certain scenes to people. Otherwise, you'd only be creating music you think is great and conveying of certain scenes, but really isn't. So, even if you do share fully crafted music you create, it might not be anything great as you say it is.

My Reply: I do have some empathy because I'd feel bad if I hurt someone's feelings and I'd feel the need to save my mother's life or help her if she were in a dire situation. Besides, since I can understand the power and emotion of songs being presented to me, then why can't I understand what music I'm creating would be powerful, great, etc. to other people?

Other Person's Response: Are there sociopaths and psychopaths who've composed amazing, moving music?

My Reply: I'm not sure. There could be.

Other Person's Response: If you're composing fully crafted music later on, it conveys nothing you describe, and is still awful music, then perhaps it's your autism making it difficult for you to relate to how other people respond to music. You wouldn't understand how to create music that truly moves, inspires, and motivates people.

My Reply: I hope that's not the case. I hope I create music that achieves my goal.

Other Person's Response: I'm a professional musician and I can tell you right now that, even if that Dark Tune was fully crafted, it's nothing good because not too many people are going to like it.

My Reply: Will there be other musicians debating against you on that? If so, then we don't know the real truth yet. I bet there will be other professional musicians and composers out there who might say something along the lines of:

"Give this man a chance! He could have something great here and all of you are being dicks! I would love to see this melody in its fully crafted form to see if this man's claims of greatness were true or not!"

Given this, I see every reason to keep an open mind. I could have something great in my head as I say. But, then again, it could be garbage.

Other Person's Response: Do you have any way to show that we're just being dicks?

My Reply: This is a video of a song from Sonic the Hedgehog. It's called the Scrap Brain Zone theme. I will show you the video:

youtu.be/NoVY7nvcel0

You can hear the melody along with all the other musical elements that go with that melody. Now, if I just took the melody that goes from 0:04-0:17 and presented that like how I've presented my melodies, then I bet there will be people who'd say this melody is nothing great, it's crap, conveys nothing, etc. (that is, if these people have never heard the Scrap Brain Zone theme. If they've already heard it, then they'd know what it is just from me sharing the melody).

Even though the melody is simple, does repeat, and there's just a bit of variation at the end when it gets to 0:17, these people would be blind to the melody's greatness, personality, and memorable quality to claim it's garbage. But, once I share the fully crafted melody in that video to these people, I bet they'd now say it's something good and catchy. Take note that I'm not talking about the whole song here. Just that short portion that goes from 0:04-0:17.

Since these people would be blind to this melody's greatness, then they could be blind to the greatness of my melodies. Once I fully craft my melodies, then I bet people would realize they're something great, too. So, I think the melodies I've presented are great and it's simply the way I've presented them that renders people bashing them. I have to present them in their fully crafted form for their greatness to be realized.

Other Person's Response: So, you think your melodies are awesome and it's simply the way you've presented them that's awful?

My Reply: Yes. This awful presentation prevents people from realizing their greatness.

Other Person's Response: That Scrap Brain Zone portion, even when fully crafted, is still nothing good or great on its own. It's having the full song that makes music great.

My Reply: I disagree. I think people would be having too high of a standard which prevents them from appreciating the power and greatness of simple tunes. After all, why can't simple tunes be something great?

Other Person's Response: I think it's best if you learn how to fully craft your melodies yourself rather than having other skilled composers do it. This is because only you know how to convey your melodies in a way you intended. If other people do it, then the melody might convey something different than you intended. This is because each person has his/her own vision of a melody and you need to make your personal vision a reality.

My Reply: I agree. When I said earlier only I know what my melodies are supposed to be and only I know their power and meaning, I was referring to my vision of my melodies that I have to bring into fruition.

Other Person's Response: Could you give me an example of a simple tune you think is great, meaningful, and catchy?

My Reply: An example would be the Wheels on the Bus nursery rhyme. Even without those lyrics, the tune itself would still be great, meaningful, and catchy.

Other Person's Response: You're right. There are simple tunes that are great as you say and I agree that Scrap Brain portion and the Frosted Flakes tune are great and catchy. But there's a big difference between a simple tune that's great, meaningful, and catchy as opposed to one that's plain garbage and doesn't convey any sort of meaning. I'm afraid your tunes are meaningless garbage even in their fully crafted form.

My Reply: How do you know that? I haven't gotten the chance to fully craft them yet. So, I don't think people should be jumping to conclusions. Neither should I jump to the conclusion that these melodies in my head are great.

Other Person's Response: I could be crazy, but maybe you do have some great melody that people don't realize yet. But, to make it fully crafted, you need proper chords, a proper beat, and everything else that makes a fully crafted tune.

My Reply: Sure. I'll learn how to do that someday.

Other Person's Response: It seems to me you don't understand things such as beats, chords, etc. If you don't understand that, then what makes you think you know how to create an awesome, powerful melody in your head?

My Reply: Melodies are very basic things since they're just notes and rests. That's what makes it easy for me to come up with an awesome melody in my head. Sure, I could also come up with a proper beat, chords, and harmony instinctively in my head to go along with that melody (I talk later on about how our brains can instinctively come up with amazing artwork in our heads).

But all of that is too complicated for me to try to reproduce at this point. It's much easier for me to reproduce the melodies themselves. Thus, I've just decided to stick with reproducing the melodies in my head and then adding basic chords and a beat. But I don't think these chords and beats work well. However, when I learn more and gain more skill in composing, that's when I'll add the proper chords, beat, harmony, instruments, etc.

Having more knowledge and experience will make matters much easier and I prefer the easy way rather than the painstaking, hard way of trying to replicate the chords, beats, harmony, instruments, etc. I hear in my mind right now. It will be easier because I'll know my chords and I'll have knowledge of other things. Think of a situation where a person has an amazing drawing he's created in his head.

Would it be easier if this person tried to painstakingly replicate the drawing in his head right now when he has very little knowledge and skill in drawing? Or would it be easier when he knows how to draw and has more skill? The latter would be the much better alternative. Even if he took up the former alternative, that would only leave him drawing like crap.

Other Person's Response: You said melodies are very basic things. Not always. Some melodies can be very complex.

My Reply: I agree. But the melodies I'm making are simple. Although, there might be some melodies I make in my head that will be complex. For now, I'm just sharing my simple melodies.

Other Person's Response: When you come up with melodies in your mind that don't have chords, harmony, etc. to go along with them, do you still understand their power and meaning?

My Reply: Yes. It's still possible to understand the power and meaning of a melody even without the chords, harmony, etc. For example, if I hear certain notes of the melody emphasized in my mind, then that conveys the melody to me in a certain way rather than just having notes and rests play in my head. In other words, the melodies I'm hearing in my mind aren't just melodies and nothing more. There's something more there that allows me to understand their power and meaning.

Other Person's Response: I don't think that fully crafted Scrap Brain portion is enough. I really think you need the full song with no technical flaws with it in order for music to be something great.

My Reply: That's like a robot or a machine requiring the exact right input. Otherwise, it spits out an error. My point is, I don't think everything needs to be perfect in order for music to be something great or beautiful. You can still have a simple tune with some technical flaws to it and it be something great. As long as the actual tune is there, then its power and personality should still be intact and I think said power/personality should still be praised.

But, if the melody was completely messed up, then I'd agree it would be awful. We as human beings are not machines or robots. We should be able to see works of art as still being great even though they're not perfected. We shouldn't be like these machines that spit out the following error whenever a great tune has some technical flaws and isn't a fully crafted song. That error would be:

"It's still nothing good or isn't that good. You must improve the craft to make it something good."

Other Person's Response: What do you mean by 'technical flaws?'

My Reply: I mean things such as bad sound quality, crackles, pops, etc.

Other Person's Response: Honestly, I think you're just projecting certain powerful meanings upon your tunes when they never had that meaning. You shouldn't confuse the meanings you project with reality. The reality is, those tunes are garbage and will remain garbage even when fully crafted. **** will always be **** regardless of how awesome you think it is. Think of those American Idol singers who believe their singing is great when it's garbage.

My Reply: I don't know if that's what's going on here. But you could be right.

Other Person's Response: Many people would say that Dark Tune, along with your other melodies, are nothing creative. They'd say they're basic, crap melodies anybody could come up with.

My Reply: I disagree with this. I think that Dark Tune is quite unique and awesome. Other people just don't realize its power and genius yet.

Other Person's Response: You said that Dark Tune was something simple, yet powerful and that it's something you would hear in the chorus part of a song. Sure, there can be simple, powerful things being played in the chorus of a song and it does repeat. But you need much more to make it a chorus.

My Reply: Understood. That's why I said I'll fully craft this melody someday. Remember, this tune is simply the chorus part taken out of an existing song I'd create. I could create the whole song myself if I want to or just fully craft the chorus, share that, and leave it at that because it should still be something awesome and powerful on its own even without the context of an entire song. Like I said. Short tunes can still be something awesome and powerful.

Other Person's Response: Trust me. Once you become a skilled, educated composer, you'll look back at those tunes you've created in your mind and realize just how awful they were. You will come to realize they were meaningless garbage all along that never conveyed anything.

I mean, if you already think certain crap works of art are great, then this shows you are blind to the truth. After all, you said in your Undecided Packet that you're blind to virtually every truth there is.

You are currently living in a fantasy since you believe your mentally inspired tunes are great. But reality will strike you once you head down the learning path of the composing art. In short, learning more allows you to see the real truth.

My Reply: Although you have a point, I can't be too sure if you're right. Only time will tell if these melodies I have in my head are great or not. For all we know, if I do become a skilled, educated composer, I might still think these tunes in my mind are great and convey the scenes I describe.

Other Person's Response: If you still think they're great and convey what you describe even after all the knowledge and experience you've gained, then there must be something wrong with you.

My Reply: Maybe you're right.

Other Person's Response: I heard you couldn't tell the difference between a crap work of art and a good one. But that you can tell the difference when the absolute worst, crap artwork is compared to a great one. Your melodies fall under the category of being absolute garbage. So, I don't know why you can't see them for the garbage they really are.

My Reply: You're right. If my tunes, for whatever reason, fall under the category of being absolute garbage, then surely it would be obvious to me. The fact I think they're great could mean they're great and that I just have to convey their greatness. Or, maybe, they're not absolute garbage, but still crap that I see as great.

Other Person's Response: Other people would say you're blind and can't see how awful your tunes are while you say other people are blind and can't see how awesome they are. So, which is it? I personally think you're the blind one.

My Reply: That's a good question to ask and I'm eager to eventually discover the real answer to it.

Other Person's Response: I thought I was a skilled basketball player once, only to find out later on I sucked once I gained knowledge and experience in the sport. I think the same thing applies to you. You should eventually come to the realization those melodies in your mind were garbage.

My Reply: We'll see then.

Other Person's Response: If you think your tunes are great and convey awesome scenes, but that people just don't understand your tunes, then you might as well be saying this to your audience:

"My music is great. You're just hearing it wrong."

My Reply: The tunes I'm hearing in my head I think are wonderful. But what I'm reproducing is awful and jarring. I need to somehow make my tunes great like they are in my head. Think about it. Any person who has an awesome artistic vision would be awful at conveying it in the real world. He must become a skilled artist to successfully convey his vision. I mean, if people really understood my tunes, then I'm quite sure they'd tell me they're awesome, pleasant to the ears, and convey the scenes I describe.

Other Person's Response: That Dark melody is way too simple and needs more notes and/or rests to make it something great when you fully craft it.

My Reply: Again, there are simple tunes out there like my Dark melody. Yet, they're still great, memorable tunes. I think these are the exact notes and rests to the melody itself. But I'll have to add much more to go along with that melody in order to convey its power and greatness.

Other Person's Response: No. Your melody really won't be anything good. It's overly simplistic and too predictable. Your melodies are either too predictable or discordantly unpredictable. There's either nothing to surprise or nothing to latch on to.

My Reply: How are my melodies overly simplistic? If I came up with a melody which had the notes C, D, E, F, and G going up, then that would be a very basic, simple melody. That melody wouldn't be anything great. But my melodies are more sophisticated than that. I don't think they're standard, generic melodies like the example I've just given. I think they're great and do convey the emotion I describe. It's not just a more sophisticated choice of notes I made.

I think my choice of notes and rests do convey the power and scenes I describe. My melodies might be too predictable as you say. But aren't there melodies out there that call for such predictability? Also, I do realize my melodies are lacking in many things to make them crafted and I do agree with the advice other people give me to help make them fully crafted. But I just don't agree they're generic melodies that convey nothing. Surely, they must convey the power and emotion I describe once they're fully crafted.

Other Person's Response: Yes, your melodies are more sophisticated than some lame, generic melody. But they're still too simple to be considered anything great or conveying of any given scene.

My Reply: I said earlier there can be simple, powerful, repeated things in the chorus of a song. Are you sure it can't be something as simple as my Dark Tune and still convey an awesome, powerful scene?

Other Person's Response: You can't just have the fully crafted chorus of a song and that be good enough. You need to engage the listener. A good part of what makes a great piece of music is the same as what makes a good bit of comedy. It's about the setup and punchline.

You need to set up the expectation of where the piece is going and then subtly deviate in an enjoyable, but unexpected way. In music, you can do this through tune, tone, texture, etc., or a combination. Then keep doing it. Most people who do that well do it without even realizing that's what they're doing. It just comes naturally. It's called talent.

When writing your packets, you also need to engage the reader as well. Otherwise, people won't even bother reading and won't think it's anything good. For example, when writing an article, it has to be done in such a way that readers would really want to continue reading it.

My Reply: I think that's too high of a standard because, let's pretend I did fully craft that chorus, then I think that, alone, is something awesome and powerful well worth appreciating. I think people just need to learn to appreciate things whether it be my writing, ideas, music, me as a person, or anything else.

Other Person's Response: Although that Dark melody does repeat, I can tell there's a bit of variation to it because some notes are lowered and then raised each time it plays.

My Reply: Some would say that's too predictable of a melody. But some melodies do have such predictability and said predictability works well with these melodies. It all depends on what emotion you want to convey. If you want to convey something different, then you'd have more variety to the melody.

Other Person's Response: I don't think it's a matter of people not understanding your tunes. I think your tunes really are ****. Also, there are many problems and a major one would be the synth you're using because it's awful!

My Reply: How do you know people understand the music I'm trying to convey? We can't prove if the melodies I'm trying to convey are understood by other people. As far as we know, they could be perceived as ordinary, crap tunes a mere child or complete beginner would come up with. If my tunes are being perceived this way by others, then it's because I need to successfully convey my melodies so they truly become understood.

In regards to the synth, it was in FL Studio. I can't see how awful it is. It's just fine to me from my perspective. That's because I lack knowledge and experience to see just how awful it is. Maybe I got the wrong settings on it. That being the case, I would have to learn how to get the right settings to make it sound good. Also, I don't have the proper instruments for my tunes either and expected people to understand my melodies and their intended power.

Other Person's Response: So, you're basically saying that, if people do get some sort of meaning or scene from your Dark Tune in its current stage (such as that it sounds like some awful, mediocre tune you would hear in a child's movie), that it wouldn't be the intended meaning and that you need to fully craft the tune so its true power and meaning can be conveyed?

My Reply: Yes. Imagine if any musical artist tried to convey a piece or a certain melody in his mind that was amazing and tragic. But other people got a whole new meaning from it and said it was all garbage. That musical artist would be an unrecognized genius.

Other Person's Response: Maybe the melody you're hearing in your mind is great. But, if you can't reproduce it for anybody else, then it doesn't really matter, does it? I could insist that I've got the greatest story of all time in my head. But, if all I can write is: "Once upon a time, there was a dog who saw a bird," that's not really a timeless classic, is it? Can I blame the reader for not understanding my brilliant story?

My Reply: You can't blame the reader. I was hoping other people would understand my melodies. But I see they can't and my only option is to fully craft these melodies.

Other Person's Response: All this situation amounts to is your mind playing tricks on you. These tunes you have in your mind are **** and you just believe they're great and convey the scenes you describe. It's all an illusion and self-deception!

My Reply: Only time will tell. Once I fully craft these tunes, then we'll see who was right and who was wrong.

Other Person's Response: There's no reason why your Dark Tune can't make a great piece of music if performed well and inventively (and with more going on than you have currently). But you've not done that. There are some tunes that are great by themselves. But then there are those tunes that are great, but can't be great by themselves. Your tune is the latter because it needs much more development before it can become great.

My Reply: I'll consider fully crafting this tune then someday.

Other Person's Response: You do post the most complete collection of bollocks I've ever come across. Those melodies of yours have NO power and meaning. They're derivative, utterly predictable, crap. Stop defending rubbish, learn a bit about music (no, you haven't), learn to use the instruments and processors you find on the net (there's LOADS of free stuff which is of extremely high quality), compose something consisting of more than a single-voice drone designed for an 8-bit game for kids (even medieval monks eventually discovered polyphony), and then join the VAST crowds of wannabee composers who struggle every day to get their works heard. I give you fair warning - there are some extremely talented people amongst that lot. You don't have a snowflake in hell's chance.

My Reply: But even tunes that might seem simple, repetitive, derivative, predictable, crap, etc. end up becoming great tunes once they're fully crafted. When I say great, I don't mean the best thing in the world. I mean something that's still great and powerful in its own way. Any given tune doesn't have to meet the highest standard to be considered great. A tune can still meet a reasonable standard of greatness. What people consider to be a reasonable standard is subjective though. For example, some people would say that the Super Mario theme song doesn't even meet a reasonable standard of greatness while I think it does.

The Super Mario theme isn't the best thing in the world. But it's still something good. The same rule applies to simple, short, repetitive tunes. Tunes such as these can still be something great and powerful. My point is, my tunes might seem like simplistic, unoriginal garbage at this stage. But I have yet to convey the tune's greatness and power. Only then should it become something great and convey what I describe. Lastly, I'm willing to take the advice of others to help me improve and successfully convey my tunes. So, I'm not dismissing any advice people give me.

Other Person's Response: Personally, I don't see how your melodies are derivative. They seem quite unique and there are some bizarre ones there, too.

My Reply: Exactly. When I'm inspired to create a melody, it's purely my own melody. I don't derive from the works of others at all. I don't know where people are getting this idea that my melodies are derivative. If they seem derivative to others for whatever reason, then it wasn't intentional on my part.

Other Person's Response:

Step 1:

Matt: "Listen to my music, isn't it great?"

Normal Person: "I listened to it and, no, it's not."

Step 2

Matt: "...but it's a deep and powerful melody..."

Normal Person: "It's not. It's rubbish."

Step 3

Matt: "...but there are basic, simple melodies out there that are powerful, great, and memorable..."

Normal Person: "Yes. But yours isn't one of those."

(repeat from step 2, occasionally step 1)

My Reply: But you just told me earlier that this melody of mine could be something great if I carried out the necessary tasks you mentioned (i.e. performing it well, having much more to it, etc.). So, how can you conclude that the melody I'm hearing in my mind is nothing great?

I think I got the right notes, rests, and tempo to the melody and I don't think it matters what anyone thinks in regards to this melody because there are many unexpected surprises in life.

You might find yourself surprised once I fully craft this melody to make it like the one I'm hearing in my head. You might find yourself looking back and realizing just how wrong you were to jump to the conclusion that I never had any talent and that my melodies were meaningless garbage.

Other Person's Response: Why do you write so much bull****?

My Reply: There are two reasons:

1.) If I fully craft my melodies and it turns out people were wrong when they say they're meaningless garbage, then everything I've written would be a matter of people looking back at this packet and realizing just how wrong they were. I also like to share and express my personal views.

I'm merely speaking up for myself and keeping an open mind to the possibility that my melodies could be great and their greatness not being recognized yet.

Many people are closed-minded and I'm not one of those people because I also keep an open mind to the possibility that other people were right. However, if it's the case other people are wrong, then my tunes really were great and I wasn't talking bull****.

2.) If I really am talking bull**** and my melodies were meaningless garbage all along, then I might as well amount to nothing more than an untalented loser who talks bull**** all the time. I might as well pester people with these lies.

Other Person's Response: You know, there is a #3. Even if #2 is the reality of the situation, you don't have to give up and deem yourself as some worthless loser. You said composing was your passion and you can still go through with it and learn how to make some good music later on. Therefore, it doesn't have to be all black and white like this.

My Reply: I'll consider #3 then if it's the case #2 is the truth. But I think it could very well be #1.

Other Person's Response: Personally, I'm convinced it's #2. Imagine if I told a child to create a melody that conveys something powerful and profound such as a couple falling in love. Sure, that child would come up with a tune, claim it's something great, conveys what he describes, and that he's an unrecognized genius who simply needs to make his melodies understandable for other listeners. But that child knows nothing and he's only deluding himself. From there, he would only remain in denial to continue to stick by his claim despite other skilled musicians telling him his tune is garbage (even when fully crafted).

My Reply: You could be right. But I'm still going with #1. I don't think I'm the equivalent of a mere child. I'm more of a person than that and I think I can be inspired to come up with truly great melodies in my head.

Other Person's Response: It has nothing to do with how great you are as a person. Music is like any other skill. If you have very little to no knowledge and experience, then you can't expect to come up with any great tune in your head. It doesn't matter even if you were the greatest, most compassionate, inspired person on Earth; without the necessary knowledge and skill, the melodies you come up with in your head will be crap.

My Reply: Music is something very personal to me and I think I can come up with truly great melodies in my mind by channeling my inspired greatness as an individual. I don't think coming up with great, powerful tunes in your mind is a matter of knowledge and experience. If I wish to express a form of greatness in my mind whether it be a tune or a landscape, I can channel my greatness and create an amazing work of art in my head.

Music is my inspiration and, thus, I don't bother coming up with amazing visuals in my mind. I do explain later on that our brains have an instinctive form of knowledge that allows us to create amazing works of art in our minds. It's not the type of knowledge one would learn from reading and studying up on things. It takes a great, inspired artist to tap into this knowledge and create an awesome work of art in his mind.

Other Person's Response: Your line of logic seems to be:

"If I channel powerful, profound emotion into creating melodies in my mind that I think convey said emotion, then they really do convey said emotion and are great melodies. From there, other people just don't recognize their greatness and power at this stage since they don't have the proper beat, chords, and harmony to make their power realized."

Sorry. That's now how it works. If you wish to create truly great tunes and themes in your head that express the emotion you want to convey, you need to know how to do that. You can't expect to be a great musician in your head just as how you can't expect to be a genius like Einstein in your head if you don't know how music works and how physics works.

My Reply: I think, when it comes to music, it's a different scenario and I explain why soon enough.

Other Person's Response: Your conclusion that these created tunes in your mind are great and convey the scenes you describe is irrational. It seems you don't have much capacity for rational thought. If you were a rational thinking person, you would've realized your melodies are meaningless garbage like other people have been telling you.

My Reply: We'll see who's the irrational one once I fully craft these melodies.

Other Person's Response: Do you wish to create good lyrics to your music?

My Reply: I don't need to. I'm concerned with just creating very good, emotionally powerful, and catchy music. Let's pretend I do create such music and it had awful lyrics, it would still be great music simply because of its power and catchiness. If anyone wishes to add their own lyrics to any fully crafted music I share in the future, that's fine. So, I'm not really concerned about being someone who comes up with good lyrics.

Other Person's Response: You see, Matt the Fraud, people who compose music that other people may want to listen to don't write whopping great treatises about what they are going to do. They simply get on with it. However, having heard bits and bobs of your previous attempts, I'd strongly advise you to take up gardening.

My Reply: First of all, I'm not trying to fraud anybody. I give all the reasons why I think these tunes I hear in my mind really are great and catchy. Second, I haven't been feeling up to composing yet due to my miserable, unhappy struggles. Therefore, I have instead chosen to write about my composing dream in the meantime until I feel up to learning how to compose. Lastly, my tunes might very well sound awful and that is to be expected at this point.

Even though I've gotten the right notes and rests to these amazing, catchy tunes I hear in my mind, that's not enough in order for music to sound good. So, all you're listening to is the notes and rests to these tunes. But something more is needed to successfully convey the greatness and catchy quality of these tunes and I don't know what that is yet. I have to learn it.

Other Person's Response: It seems to me you really are trying to fraud people. Why else would you write this whole packet?

My Reply: It's because I have problems with the personal views of other people and I feel the need to speak up for myself and to thoroughly address said issues. I have an issue with other people who claim that my emotions aren't the source of value in my life. So, that's why I've written so many of my other packets which talk about how emotions are value judgments.

I also have an issue with people who have unreasonably high standards when it comes to works of art whether said works be comedy, music, or anything else. So, that's why I've written this whole packet. I also just wish to share everything that's on my mind regarding my composing dream. It would be like how someone wishes to write every single thing that's on his mind in his journal and share it.

Other Person's Response: Even if your music turns out to be amazing, that doesn't make you an amazing person.

My Reply: Music is an expression of our personality. Therefore, if you create amazing music, that makes you an amazing person. If there was a horrible person who created amazing music, that person would be horrible in one area, but would be an amazing person in another area.

Actually, according to my definition, positive emotions are what make you an amazing person and negative emotions are what make you a horrible or disgusting person.

But I'm not going by my personal definition here. As a matter of fact, I go outside my personal definition of beauty and greatness when I talk about how other people can't appreciate the greatness and beauty of artwork.

Other Person's Response: I could also restate your line of logic as:

"I completely disagree with others when they say the melodies in my mind I'm trying to convey are meaningless crap. Music is an expression of our personality. Since I know how to express myself as an individual, then that means I instinctively know how to express various forms of power and greatness through music in my own head. In other words, I don't need to study up on how music works in order for me to create great, powerful melodies in my head. But I do need to study if I wish to convey these melodies and their greatness/power in the real world (which I plan on doing)."

My Reply: Yes.

Other Person's Response: Although I admire the type of inspiration you're channeling to create these melodies in your mind since you're inspired to come up with awesome, evil, powerful, dark tunes, what good is that if all you're creating is **** music both in your head and in the real world? Just because you have an awesome inspiration doesn't mean the works of art you create in your head will be awesome, too.

My Reply: I don't think such awesome inspiration/emotion is yielding **** melodies in my mind. I think these melodies in my mind reflect the awesome inspiration used in creating them. I just have to find a way to convey these melodies.

Other Person's Response: I think you're confusing the amazing, powerful emotion used in creating your melodies with the melodies themselves. You see them as being one when they're not.

My Reply: I can still be apathetic (emotionless) and come up with a melody in my head that I think is awesome and powerful.

Other Person's Response: The value system you live by is **** and your music is ****! Some life! Some talent!

My Reply: That's just your opinion. I have my own personal views and I often times find myself disagreeing with a lot of people.

Other Person's Response: You keep using the term "catchy" to describe music. What do you mean by that?

My Reply: Music that is catchy is also called "earworms." That means they're tunes or songs that stick in your mind and repeat over and over again. Like I said, I think I'm creating catchy tunes in my mind.

I even hear professional, beautiful singers singing some of my created tunes in my head because I sometimes use beautiful singers to come up with melodies in my head.

Other Person's Response: How do you come up with your great, catchy melodies? Do you just pick what series of notes sound good to you?

My Reply: No. It's nothing like a student being with a music teacher who says to pick what series of notes sound good to him. An average lay person would use this method in coming up with melodies that sound good to him. How do you think Koji Kondo created the Super Mario theme?

I bet he didn't just sit there and picked what series of notes sounded good to him. What I do to create my melodies is I let the emotion/inspiration create the melodies for me. It's as though I can use pure emotion/inspiration alone to sculpt a musical work of art in my own mind.

This method is something greater and goes deeper than just playing around on the keyboard to come up with tunes or just casually coming up with melodies in your mind that sound good to you.

This greater method is like using your own soul or your very life essence to craft music rather than just being an average person coming up with average melodies. It would be like a person deeply inspired to come up with great music as opposed to an average person going to work and making music as an ordinary job that he likes and enjoys.

Other Person's Response: So, you're basically saying that music is a very profound, spiritual thing and, thus, you can come up with great, powerful tunes in your head through your very soul rather than through actually studying up on things and learning how to do it.

My Reply: Yes.

Other Person's Response: You can't create any amazing, catchy music in your mind if you don't know how to do it. So, you're only deluding yourself into believing these tunes you have in your head convey scenes, are catchy, and are great tunes.

My Reply: I know instinctively how to express sadness, anger, or joy if I felt sad, angry, or joyful. The same idea applies to making music in my mind. I know instinctively how to create great, catchy tunes in my mind that express whatever emotion I'm feeling.

I would call my musical instinct a higher instinct and a more advanced form of expression since I'm creating amazing, emotionally powerful and profound tunes in my head as opposed to simply performing certain gestures or tones of voice. In other words, I can express myself through music far better than what any tones, acts, and gestures can.

Only in my mind though at this point. So, you are wrong. I don't need to know how music works. I just need to channel whatever emotion I'm feeling. The only time I need to know how music works is if I wish to successfully convey the music I hear in my mind (which I want to do).

Also, I only channel the positive emotions because I see nothing beautiful about negative emotions. When I create dark or dramatic sounding tunes, I'm actually channeling positive emotions. They would be powerful, dramatic, good feelings.

Other Person's Response: So, you're basically saying that music is instinctive and that a person doesn't need to study up on things to create great music in his head?

My Reply: Yes. But he does need to if he wishes to successfully convey his artistic vision.

Other Person's Response: Your whole idea that you somehow know instinctively how to create good, powerful, and catchy music in your head is plain nonsense!

My Reply: Music is a part of me since it's something so profound and beautiful to me. I may not know music technically. But I do know it personally (instinctively). So, I consider music to be an extension of myself which means I can instinctively create great music in my head.

I do not need to know the technical information of how to express love, hate, sorrow, or joy because I can do that naturally on my own. Sure, there is technical information on that (which has to do with evolution and psychology).

If I was a robot, then I would read this technical information because I wouldn't have the instincts of a human being. But, since I am a human being, then I can instinctively express things like love and joy without studying up on evolution and psychology.

The same thing applies to music. That's how I instinctively know how to create powerful and catchy tunes in my head that express whatever I want to express. For now, I'm just creating tunes and not anything fully crafted in my head.

Other Person's Response: I think I know what's going on here. You can't tell the difference between a tune that's awful gibberish and a tune that's good and catchy.

Since you don't know what makes a good, catchy tune that conveys scenes or characters due to your lack of musical knowledge, then that leaves you creating gibberish tunes in your mind that you think are good, catchy, and convey scenes.

In other words, fully crafting these tunes is futile since they're all meaningless, awful gibberish anyway. It would really be no different than a child playing around on the keyboard, plucking random notes, and then saying he's got something great to fully craft and share to the world.

My Reply: We can't say for sure if this is the case yet. Besides, if these tunes I've made convey such profound meaning to me, then they have to be good, catchy tunes. If I were to listen to some kids plucking out random notes on keyboards or making random ruckus with their guitars, then I'm quite sure I would see that as awful gibberish. So, the very fact that I see my tunes as great and catchy must mean they are great and catchy.

Other Person's Response: What you're doing here is making an irrational judgment of these tunes you have in your head because it's a judgment that doesn't match up with reality. As a matter of fact, many people make such irrational judgments all the time. For example, I could truly perceive a random stranger on my streets as a horrible, disgusting person simply because this is how I feel about him/her. But that would be my own judgment which doesn't make it true.

My Reply: I don't know about that yet. It could really be the case these tunes really are that great and that I just have to find a way to convey them. Music is something so personal and profound to me that it could be the case I can naturally come up with great tunes in my head through inspiration alone.

It would be like how an anime character is profoundly connected to the fire spirit and, as a result, is naturally gifted in the art of the fire spirit. That character would be gifted mentally since it's a mental/spiritual connection with the fire spirit.

In other words, that character can be inspired with wonderful, amazing ideas through the fire spirit. But some knowledge and training would be needed in order for that character to convey his ideas.

This analogy applies to me because I would be profoundly connected to the spirit of music and can be inspired to come up with great tunes in my head. I'm not saying the spirit of music is an actual spirit. That would just be a metaphor.

Other Person's Response: What if you do become a fully trained and educated composer, but compose fully crafted music that's lame and doesn't express what you want to express?

My Reply: Then I'd find that quite frustrating and would give up composing if this doesn't change. Now, one would think that me being a fully trained and educated composer is all that's needed for me to achieve this goal. But, perhaps something more is needed that I just don't have. I will give another anime analogy here to get my point across since I love anime. Goku was able to achieve Super Saiyan.

But Vegeta couldn't no matter how hard he trained. In other words, Goku had something within himself that allowed him to become Super Saiyan that Vegeta didn't have. But, Vegeta did go Super Saiyan later on. However, that's beside the point here.

The point I'm trying to make here is that I could go through all the education and training I want to with composing. But, I would always be lacking something necessary that would allow me to compose music that's awesome and expresses what I wish to express. Such an ability would be something I can't obtain through education and training.

Other Person's Response: So, you're basically saying you'll never be any good at composing no matter how much education and training you get?

My Reply: Correct. I hope that's not the case though.

Other Person's Response: I know you've talked about your mother in your previous packet. But what about your father?

My Reply: I don't live with my father and I only see him when it's my birthday (which would be September 1st). Although, he has practiced the guitar for years and is a very good guitar player. He even composes his own music. Who knows, I might have inherited some of his talent and, as a result, am creating amazing, catchy tunes in my mind. As far as I recall, I've been creating such tunes in my mind ever since I was a very young child. I even sang them.

But, since I don't know how to sing, then everyone would just hear them as gibberish tunes. As for these tunes I've created in my mind when I was a young child, they were catchy, amazing, children's tunes and not the style of tunes I'm creating in my mind now. So, I'm naturally talented when it comes to creating good tunes in my head. But I'm not naturally talented when it comes to playing an instrument, singing, or getting the notes to these tunes right the first time. I have to keep toying around on the keyboard until I think I've gotten the notes right.

Other Person's Response: Do you remember one of these tunes you've created in your mind as a young child?

My Reply: Yes. I remember it like yesterday. I will convey this tune when I know how to do it so everyone can listen to it. I'm not going to be a singer. I'm just going to compose tunes by figuring out the notes on the keyboard and going from there on musical software. Also, back then, when I was a child, I was limited to creating catchy, childish tunes in my mind since my brain didn't have enough musical information to create these new tunes I'm creating in my mind now. I talk more about this below.

Other Person's Response: Children think they're creating great tunes in their heads all the time. How are you special? Do you think you're gifted? If so, then can other people create great, amazing music in their heads somehow?

My Reply: Our brains are naturally capable of creating amazing works of art in our head, as I said before. But, how do our brains create amazing works of art on their own? Well, I think it's like learning the English language. Your brain picks it up and you learn to speak English yourself naturally. Likewise, when you listen to music your whole life, your brain naturally picks up on that which means your brain is capable of creating amazing music in your mind.

There's a software known as Rosetta Stone where people sit there, listen to new languages, and learn to speak them naturally. I think the same idea applies to other things as well such as music, visual art, etc. However, learning to speak a language is different because you can automatically convey any message you want to convey while it requires actual knowledge and training to convey the music and visual art you create in your mind.

Other Person's Response: If you know how to create amazing, catchy tunes in your mind, do you also know how to create amazing poetry in your mind or how to create an amazing story?

My Reply: No. But that's only because I never read poetry or stories as a daily routine. Had I done so, then my brain would absorb that information and I would know how to do it naturally just like how I'm able to naturally come up with amazing, catchy tunes in my mind.

Other Person's Response: Is there any amazing work of art you can instinctively craft in your mind besides good music?

My Reply: Yes. I can come with awesome fighting moves in my mind. I can imagine 2 characters fighting and performing awesome, complex moves. These are moves better than what the average person would come up with.

Since I've played video games and watched anime my whole life where characters fight, then I instinctively know how to create skilled moves in my mind just like I instinctively know how to speak the English language.

Of course, if I tried to convey these moves to you by any means such as performing them myself or creating them on some type of animation software of 2 stick figures fighting, I bet people would tell me these moves are awful and/or that they just don't understand these moves.

This is because I don't have the necessary animation skill or physical fighting skill to successfully convey them. But I am a skilled fighter mentally. The thing is, I wish to convey the music I hear in my mind and not any fighting moves or any visual art I create in my mind.

In other words, music is my passion and that's what I'm going for. Now, even if I did successfully convey these moves I have in my mind, it doesn't have to be the greatest martial arts display in order for it to be considered talent or something great.

As long as these moves are significantly better than what an average person would come up with, then I consider that to be talent and greatness.

For example, the average person might have one character simply beating another character's face back and forth or having one character simply keep on throwing energy blasts.

In other words, think of the average moves a child or a young teenager would come up with who knows nothing about martial arts. As for me, I would create moves that make a much better work of art. They would be sophisticated moves.

Other Person's Response: So, according to you, any work of art that's significantly better than what an average person would come up with (such as your martial arts example) is talent and greatness?

My Reply: Yes. That's why I consider the comedy scenes I make to be talent and greatness despite the fact they're not the best comedy scenes in the world. I personally think my last comedy scene is the best of them all in this packet. You see certain comedy scenes in cartoons and anime and, even though they're not the best in the world, they're still great since they're better than what the average person could come up with. The same idea applies to my comedy scenes.

Other Person's Response: Do you think any fully crafted tunes will turn out to be much better than your comedy scenes?

My Reply: Yes. Even my best comedy scenes.

Other Person's Response: I know plenty of people who don't know anything about composing, but are unable to create good music in their minds since they don't know how to do it. By your logic, they should know how to do it.

My Reply: Their brains already know how to create good music. They just need that inspiration which would allow their brains to tap into that knowledge they have. By tapping into that knowledge, they will be able to create good music in their mind. There are certain methods that allow our brains to tap into that knowledge to create amazing works of art in our minds. The example I gave was dreams, near death experiences, or psychedelic drugs. But inspiration can also do the trick.

Other Person's Response: I really don't think deeply inspired people who know nothing about how music works can create amazing music in their minds. The same rule applies to other artwork.

My Reply: If that's so, then maybe it's just because they don't have the ability to tap into artistic greatness during their normal, waking life. I have that ability and maybe other people can develop it, too. I would imagine there are people who have that ability. As for those people who don't have that ability, then they'll have to rely on dreams and drug trips to mentally create amazing works of art.

Other Person's Response: What works of art are our brains naturally capable of creating then?

My Reply: It could be anything. Even a new song by Michael Jackson that is just as great, powerful, profound, memorable, and catchy as any one of his songs. If you've ever listened to MJ's music, then your brain already has all the information it needs to create a new song that is just as good as MJ's songs. Your brain would know the very soul or personality of his music and create a whole new song.

Other Person's Response: You certainly do have the spirit and passion of an artist since your goal is to create powerful and profound music that amazes the audience. But, without the actual talent to compose some amazing music, then you won't get anywhere.

My Reply: That's why I hope I can create the amazing music I want to create someday.
 
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