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4Players Gives 84 Percent. The Verdict: The Weakest Zelda To Date

Unlucky Monkey

The Great King of Apes
Joined
May 17, 2011
Location
NRW, Germany
4Players.de is one of the most popular gaming magazines in Germany. The whole stuff is not printed, but features fully and for free in the web.

The poor score of 84 percent is similar, or even worse than the Gamespot score. The outrage in the forums of 4Players is gigantic. Telling this series needs a complete renovation. Under 85 percent, there is no possibility to achieve any game of the year award. 85 percent is gold. 90 percent is platinum. 84 percent is the worst score for a Zelda game ever ins this magazine.

I will translate the contras (as good as I can).

unheimlich zäher Einstieg
austauschbares Bonbon- Artdesign
sehr unspektakuläres Intro
zu wenig Erkundungsreize in der Himmelswelt
streng lineare Freundin- ist- weg- Story
kaum Herausforderungen für Veteranen
drei Gebiete und Bosse werden recycelt
präzises Fechten zu selten gefordert
nur Guttural- Laute als Sprachausgabe
kleine Kamera- und Steuerungszicken
Extreme tough beginning
Interchangeable Artdesign
Boring Intro
Nothing important to explore in the Skyworld
Linearly "Girlfriend is missing" story
No challenges for veterans
Three Areas and bosses were recycled (what does he mean with this one?)
Rare use of precise swordplay (he means the use of Wii Motion Plus)
No voice acting
A few camera and controll issues


The verdict:

Aber Zelda ist mit diesem Abenteuer nicht gereift, sondern wirkt mittlerweile zu naiv, zu beengt, zu durchschaubar und ist überreif für einen Wechsel in der Regie.
But Zelda did not mature (grown up) with this Adventure. It seems nowadays to naiv, cramped, transparent and it's really time for a change in the direction (it's a pun. He means the direction for the series in the future, and a new director behind the chair).

No good news from my folks. This review is crap. I was for many years a reader of 4Players. The reviews were fair and independent until the end of 2010 and the beginning of 2011. What's wrong there? I mean, everything under 85 percent on this website is an disapointment for a big game.

Is anyone d'accord with the complains? Please tell me. I can't accept this score.
 
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Unlucky Monkey

The Great King of Apes
Joined
May 17, 2011
Location
NRW, Germany
Thanks Juicie. Many folks at the forums at 4Players are now against Skyward Sword. For these guys, the written words are holy. The influence of 4Players in Germany is not that unimportant.

The review was written by Jörg Luibl. He is the Editor in Chief of this website. He gave Uncharted 3 90 percent. Well it's exact the same game as Uncharted 1 and 2, but he was extreme fascinated by Drakes Deception. It's totally ridiculous.

He wrote many worse things in the past, but this review feels really like the end of the world.
 
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Deku-Jack

The Garo Master
Joined
Jun 16, 2010
Location
Termina
It doesn't matter about Game of the Year, 10/10s, 5/5s, #1 Game or whatever award.
It's about YOU. What do you think of the game? Why does it matter what THEY think?
 

Unlucky Monkey

The Great King of Apes
Joined
May 17, 2011
Location
NRW, Germany
Yes, you're right Jack. But for a professional gaming magazine, I mean, these guys earn money for the writing, this review is totally immature. You have to read everything. Well, if you're fluent in German, you may understand a little of my frustration.
 

Ventus

Mad haters lmao
Joined
May 26, 2010
Location
Akkala
Gender
Hylian Champion
Now I don't agree with this review, but its what the players believe. Obviously, the reviewer was a vet/pro who was wholly uninterested in Skyward Sword. It isn't unreasonable for him to personally rate the game 84 percent. I myself have yet to play the game, but from walkthroughs and gameplay the enemies really do seem uninteresting, and I absolutely HATED one of the plot twists at the end of the game because a certain character did NOT make an appearance in the flesh, so to speak. Back to the point: the reviewer has his own opinions, it doesn't matter if he rates it a 0/100 (like THAT's possible, but still) – what matters to you should be what you think.
 
Joined
Sep 23, 2011
I find it very interesting that all of the big, credible reviews gave the game heaps of praise when the more unknown or unreliable sites have given lower scores.
 

Locke

Hegemon
Site Staff
Joined
Nov 24, 2009
Location
Redmond, Washington
Extreme tough beginning
Interchangeable Artdesign
Boring Intro
Nothing important to explore in the Skyworld
Linearly "Girlfriend is missing" story
No challenges for veterans
Three Areas and bosses were recycled (what does he mean with this one?)
Rare use of precise swordplay (he means the use of Wii Motion Plus)
No voice acting
A few camera and controll issues


But Zelda did not mature (grown up) with this Adventure. It seems nowadays to naiv, cramped, transparent and it's really time for a change in the direction(it's a pun. He means the direction for the series in the future, and a new director behind the chair).
Tough beginning? Maybe because he let his perception of how boring the intro was affect how involved in learning the gameplay he was. (an unfair attack, I know)
I don't know what "Interchangeable Artdesign" is, but I assume he doesn't like the art style. eh, opinions...can't argue with him.
As Koizumi stated in some interview or another, "Save the Princess" (in this case "Girlfriend is Missing") is not story. This reviewer is judging the story on the wrong grounds.
I don't know how bad the recycled bosses are since I haven't played it yet, but three areas is not a negative. If this guy had bothered to read Iwata Asks, he'd know that they intentionally limited it to three areas in order to make it dense, and reused them so that you could explore the same areas throughout the game and uncover more about them. I think this is a great way to go, since you get more familiar with the game world but it still stays interesting. In contrast, some games in the past had locations that you would visit once and then forget about (e.g. some WW islands). That isn't very immersing.
No voice acting - ummm.... I thought this was a list of reasons the game is bad? =/
camera and control issues - this is what I would have focused on, like GameSpot did. If they failed at making interesting and intuitive controls, only then have they failed at making this game (though I wouldn't even go that far).

But the kicker of it all is the very last line - the pun about changing developers. This was Fujibayashi's first console Zelda game. They already did change the direction. This sort of ignorance doesn't to anything for the reviewer's credibility.
 

Deku-Jack

The Garo Master
Joined
Jun 16, 2010
Location
Termina
Yes, you're right Jack. But for a professional gaming magazine, I mean, these guys earn money for the writing, this review is totally immature. You have to read everything. Well, if you're fluent in German, you may understand a little of my frustration.
Guess so. And don't worry, that post was not directed towards you, it was towards anyone who does let reviews effect their overall experience. Not sure if you even thought it was directed towards you, but just clarifying in case.
 
Joined
Sep 24, 2011
I know the review won't change my idea or feelings, but what does irritate me is when someone is so closed minded or, in the case of gamespot, stupid about something that they're supposed to be professional about. And one of my pet peeves about things that people say about Zelda is when they try and say it needs to change. It doesn't... plain and simple. That's why it's Zelda after all. If God of War changed then people would be mad wouldn't they? CoD fans would be absolutely enraged if you took the Call of Duty formula and changed it so that it wasn't the same. It's the reason there are different types of games like Battlefield and Homefront so that people wouldn't have JUST Call of Duty. If someone doesn't want to play Zelda or go through its formula, then there are other games out there to stimulate those likes but Zelda is enjoyed the way it is and to change that in any way would make it something else. Implementing the play style and graphics of each individual game are something that I look forward to. Seeing Hyrule and its inhabitants be they either monster or civillian or main character is a joy to discover to me. Using the different uniqueness of each game in each game adds to the entire Zelda experience. In this way Zelda covers a little bit of everything throughout all of their games. I know there are going to be even more things to come out that will be new, or unique, or awe inspiring that will keep me coming back to Zelda for ages to come. For 21 years it's been doing it and I see no reason why it won't continue to do so.
 

Sarianae

Infinite Dreamer
Joined
Nov 21, 2010
Location
Storybrooke, Maine
U-M, I can tell you what I think this reviewer was thinking when they played the game: he was likely wanting it to be just a completely different game. Chances are, he probably wanted Zelda to have the popular "HD realism" style that Uncharted 3 and other modern games that probably appeal to him have. Issue is, Zelda isn't meant to be like those games, meaning the problem here is that the reviewer likely just lacks an appreciation for the identity of Zelda in general.

What particularly sets off alarms for me is this:

UM said:
But Zelda did not mature (grown up) with this Adventure. It seems nowadays to naiv, cramped, transparent and it's really time for a change in the direction(it's a pun. He means the direction for the series in the future, and a new director behind the chair).
Specifically the part about saying Zelda needs to "mature" or "grow up," because that seems to suggest the reviewer having the mentality of Skyward Sword being "childish," which in all likelihood probably boils down to just a stubborn distaste for the art direction that intentionally shuns realism for a more artistic visual direction.

This is what such people seem to be missing though: Zelda is fantasy, and there's a certain direction to the series that defines what Zelda is as a game. Skyward Sword does in fact change up the Zelda formula considerably, but it does so without betraying the context of what defines the Zelda experience. Claiming that the series needs "a new direction" blatantly fails to acknowledge that carefully constructed overhaul they worked so hard to pull off, and appears to demand what'd simply be a completely different game. If that's the case, they should just go play the game they have in mind rather than wish for Zelda to turn into the replica of what they desire and lose its individuality.

In terms of reviewers who can appreciate the identity of Zelda, U-M, I would suggest to you to read the following quotes from a few different reviews (there were actually a lot more reviews I could've referenced, but I kept it to a few simply because including too many references for each point would've made this post endless). I would also suggest that you direct your german fellows on that review site to read these as well. Basically, the opinions below are pretty much the majority opinion I've seen among a lot of Skyward Sword reviews:

In terms of the beginning/intro:

Kotaku review said:
In its first 10 hours, it is a slow starter, establishing its version of Zelda standards; in its next 20 or so, it repeatedly shows off how its version of those standard might, mostly, be better; and in its final 10 it finally defies expectations, remixing the series' hallmark dungeon-exploration progression into something almost unrecognizable as Zelda formula. And then it ends, immediately sorely missed.
Note how the german review you mentioned neglected to make any comment about anything past the "intro." Why no comment on progression of the game beyond that point?

In terms of linearly "Girlfriend is missing" story--

--actually first, I have a comment on this. At the core of Zelda's story is its "Hero saves the Princess" tale. It's not particularly original, but it also isn't meant to be; the appeal is actually in how traditional it is. If it doesn't appeal to you, then Zelda just isn't your cup of tea. The "girlfriend is missing" concept is inputted under the same principle (if you can even call Zelda Link's girlfriend at all), except that it should actually be an improvement on the former because 'missing girlfriend' implies a more personal relationship, opening up opportunity in the story for better character development between the concerned characters, which in turn creates a greater motivation and personal interest in the player to progress throughout the game, vastly improving the overall experience.

IGN Review said:
Zelda herself is by far the star of the show and her relationship with Link early on forms the backbone of the entire game. You want Link to succeed not so much because you're worried about saving what will eventually become Hyrule, but because you genuinely care that he cares about Zelda.
Further than that, there's more worth hearing about the story:

GI (Game Informer) Review said:
The biggest surprise in Skyward Sword is the story. For all the different shapes it has taken, the plot of The Legend of Zelda has always been a fairly predictable affair that feels like an afterthought. Skyward Sword doesn't elevate the art of video game storytelling, but it is a major step up for the franchise, with clever writing, an interesting (if strange) new villain, and a wide cast of characters that would feel at home in one of Disney's better animated movies.
GN (GoNintendo) Review said:
I'm sorry to sound like a broken record, but Skyward Sword's story is leagues beyond what other games have offered. I really hope this comes off as genuine. I've been with Zelda since the first outing, which means I've experienced all the story that's out there. Skyward Sword's story flows better, ties up loose ends and creates more twists than you can even imagine.

There are moments when things clicked in my head. A handful of cut-scenes hit me with a huge impact, bringing back memories of previous games. There are storyline elements that hit you and make the long-time Zelda fan realize just how some of these Zelda games are connected. There are direct lines drawn that make you realize that Aonuma and Miyamoto really do have a storyline penned out.
Also, that bit about Voice Acting ties in here as well:

IGN Review said:
Skyward Sword features cinematics that play out like a movie. At times they are downright captivating with their picturesque settings and powerful drama. The game lacks voice acting as always, but characters' emotions shine through regardless, and the framing of scenes is incredible. As the story moves into its final act, you'll be stunned at the quality on display here. This is easily Nintendo's best storytelling to date.
In terms of the "interchangeable Artdesign:"

IGN Review said:
Despite their polarizing, standard definition nature, Skyward Sword's visuals count amongst its strongest points. Nintendo has finally found a style that perfectly embodies the Zelda series. By capturing the maturity of Twilight Princess and the vibrant, youthful energy of Wind Waker, this franchise now has the perfect outlet to fully express itself without compromise. Full of bizarre, quirky characters as well as creatures from the darkness, Nintendo has found a tone that captures the best of both ideas while still serving the most important element of all - the gameplay.
GN review said:
I believe that the graphics of Skyward Sword may be the most overlooked and under-appreciated aspect of the game. Not since Wind Waker have I stopped to look around and take in the scenery so often. The way the game takes background elements and fades them into/out of an impressionist art style is absolutely mesmerizing. Honestly, the visual effect that's put into place boggles my mind. I don't know how Nintendo achieved this design. To take in-game elements that you can visit and give them a surreal visual flare while they're in the background...it's gorgeous. You literally watch globs of beautiful watercolors go from vaguely familiar shapes into fully-realized set pieces in front of your eyes. Please, take some time to note this feature of the game. It's a bold and risky approach that humbled me time and time again.
In terms of the "Skyworld" and exploration it has:

GN review said:
For those that want the long, exploration-filled travel of Wind Waker, that's here for you as well. There are a number of floating islands that involve side-quests or are meant for exploration alone. You can hit the skies from any save point and take on this exploration all you want. Fly at your own leisure to any island and dive in from any point. Some islands contain multiple items to pick up, but you'll have to explore every nook and cranny to find them all. What looks like a tiny island might require diving in from multiple angles to find every little hidden bit. There's one island in particular where I found myself revisiting four separate times to find all of its goodies, and that involved flying over it at multiple angles to find those treasures.
Kotaku review said:
"The sky portion of Skyward Sword is similar to the ocean in The Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker. It is huge and pocked with islands to explore. Few, however, contain the delightful surprises or natural beauty of Wind Waker's landmasses and the sky realm of this new game, while beautiful, is the least interesting sector. The land zones, on the other hand, are among the best-designed playing fields for single-player adventure designed in this gaming generation. They are gorgeous, even to eyes dazzled by the HD graphics on competing consoles that the Wii can't generate. They are stuffed with interesting enemies to fight and puzzles that vex. Those elements aren't just in the game's unusual and cleverly-built dungeons. They infest the long lead-ups to dungeons."
The main factor that gets me here is that the german review your mentioning seems to have intentionally neglected speaking about the actual overworld design under the clouds. This is an extremely large portion of the game that makes up a huge bulk of the content.....how could they have failed to address it? It seems rather deliberately left out. They mention "recycled areas," but I don't think that properly addresses the overworld at all.

GN Review said:
'Dense' is a word you've heard from Nintendo when concerning the content of Skyward Sword, and boy is it true. I promise you, never have you ever seen a Zelda game with this much content packed into every area you visit. Locations in this game were utilized to their fullest. There are no filler areas where you just wander, only to realize that there's nothing to do. I kid you not, 99% of the locations you visit have either a main storyline element or side-quest related content. These areas may be quite expansive in and of themselves, but there are always things to see and do that can help you on your quest.
In terms of recycling areas and bosses:

GN said:
Will you be returning to areas that you've visited in the past? Indeed you will, and you'll be given new things to tackle. Will those new mechanics offer up new locations and experiences? That's one of the best parts, because they indeed do. Some people might be put off by traveling to older areas to obtain new items, but Skyward Sword handles it beautifully. You'll return to four specific locations in the game a handful of times, but when you do you'll discover new elements. You'll find parts of the world you couldn't access before, which open up entirely new regions. I'm not talking about one new cave...I'm talking about entirely new expanses.

Just when you think the maps for these locations are full, you'll gain access to a new area that opens up into a brand new element. I'd be told along the way to return to a previous location, and a few times I had an idea of what I would be doing or where I'd go, but other times I was genuinely surprised with how the game opened up. Backtracking may be a dirty word to some gamers, but when you're given so much content to explore, it's hard not to be excited with each return.

If anything, this design choice just goes to show how truly dense this experience is. There is a ridiculous amount to do in every major location of the game. You'll be finding new areas and goodies, taking on new quests and enemies in these locations right up to the end of the game. Every single virtual square-foot is utilized, and it's brimming with content. This is a major change for the series, and it absolutely screams out at you when playing. If you long for the days when Zelda offered open wandering but you want a more focused goal at the same time, this would be your optimal blend.
IGN Review said:
Taking a page from Metroid, Skyward Sword requires you to travel repeatedly back to familiar environments, each time altering some key attribute or providing you with new tools to make the experience completely fresh. New areas and paths lead to vast, unexplored territory that is just as deep, important and engrossing as any of the material that preceded it. Combat aside, Nintendo's greatest achievement in Skyward Sword just might be its new approach to designing its worlds. Arriving at dungeons and temples now takes hours, and none of that time is wasted. The sheer brilliance on display here, evident more and more as you journey deeper into the game, will stun even the most jaded gamer.
Something else that feels deliberately left out in that german review is talk of Dungeon design, which along with Overworld design (especially since the two particularly intertwine with each other in Skyward Sword) is rather a large attribute of the game to neglect mention of.

Kotaku Review said:
The Dungeons: Wonderful (after the first one). Continuing a series streak of stunning dungeon design that had been advanced by 2009's under-rated DS game The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks, most of the dungeons in Skyward Sword are ingenious, hand-crafted chambers of puzzles, battles and surprises that cohere into well-paced, brain-tickling levels. They are more satisfying to play than the levels of any other game I've played this year, with the possible exception of Portal 2.
IGN said:
Dungeons are now smaller, and tired staples like lighting torches and endlessly pushing blocks are largely absent in favor of far more creative concepts that frequently use all of the items at Link's disposal. Some dungeons even relish forcing you to methodically work one item to the next, a reminder that you have many tools at your disposal. Skyward Sword's dungeons not only manage to progressively get better, they're some of the most genius designs ever seen in the Zelda series. The final temple just might be the best Nintendo has ever created.
GN Reivew said:
Oh, and how varied these dungeons are. Things start off with the typical themes for dungeons, and then the game takes quite a turn. There are some dungeons locations or themes are are truly awe-inspiring. Remember how we thought the snow dungeon from Twilight Princess was a unique idea? It still is, but that sensibility and approach has been really fleshed out here. You'll see things you've never seen in Zelda dungeons before. You'll visit locations and themes in multiple different approaches. Don't think that once you've seen a Fire temple that you've seen them all. This Zelda game goes out of its way to show you just how many different ways a single theme can be used. If you're going into dungeons thinking about how long they are or what themes are used, you are entirely missing the point.
Kotaku Review said:
Bosses: Also wonderful. The developers resist the urge to include bosses that are comprised of one giant head and two giant swatting hands. Instead, each is an excellent and distinct challenge, almost all of them testing the player's ability to wield a Wii Remote and Nunchuk with dexterity. To beat them, the player must slash their "sword" in any of eight directions (it matters! you can't cheat) and block a lot, since defense is surprisingly important in this game. The bosses are satisfying to battle and among the Skyward Sword's highlights. The reliance on motion-controlled swordplay to determine the outcome of many fights allows the game's developers to even elevate what would in other Zelda games feel like ordinary encounters to dramatic boss-level battles. A single Stalfos skeleton enemy is a formidable foe, attacking and blocking in complex ways that require a concentrated and careful counter-attack. (And then the game makes you fight three at once!)
GN Review said:
As if these dungeons weren't enough on their own, the boss battles are some of the best I've seen yet. Overall I'd say that the boss battles can stand toe-to-toe with the highlights from any other Zelda game, but personally I feel there are two, if not three boss battles that are the best the series has seen. One in particular gave me goosebumps while playing, and I couldn't help but grin from ear to ear. It was engaging, sophisticated, multi-faceted and unlike anything else I've seen in a Zelda game. My dear lord, just typing about it now is making those goosebumps come back.
In terms of "Challenge" for veterans:

GN Review said:
As you progress through the game, the dungeons get more engaging and sophisticated. There were a handful of times where I found myself scratching my head. There were also instances where I knew what I had to do, but getting it done was a daunting task. That's not to say that there were frustrations with the methods of tackling a puzzle, but instead, I knew I'd have to bring my A game to get things done. There are situations that dungeons offer up where you'll be forced to look at things from a different perspective. Your previous Zelda 'training' will indeed help, but get ready for new mechanics and ideas that will surprise even the most sophisticated Zelda fan.
In terms of lacking need for precise swordplay:

Kotaku Review said:
The game's requirement for players to use precise motion is a requirement for the player to have skill. You will fail if you flail. You will succeed if you are thoughtful, have good reflexes and can keep your cool. The angles of your swing matter, and, in that respect, the game does feel less digital—less binary—in its interactions than most Zeldas do. Typically in Zelda there is a problem—a puzzle or an enemy—and usually just one way to solve it. You either solve it or you don't. You can dispatch an enemy with a variety of different weapons, but even they either work or they don't. The motion controls in this new Zelda convey a perhaps illusory but exciting sense that things are less definite, that accidents can happen and that luck might too. They prove that gradients of skill do factor in. This time, the player will feel themselves gain power not strictly through the accumulation of series-standard gadgets but through the practice of physical maneuvers and the improvement humans generally enjoy the more they do something.
GN Review said:
Every enemy fight you get into is now a puzzle it and of itself. I know, you've heard that line time and time again. You know why you heard Nintendo say it so many times? It's because it's actually true. You have to learn enemy patterns, and approaching new enemies is a learning process. Even basic enemies require specific sword slashes. The earlier enemies in the game can be taken out quite easily indeed, but even with them you'll find that swinging a certain way can make the process easier and quicker. Enemies just a couple hours into the game will show you that waggling your Wiimote will do nothing for you. You'll see Link standing with his sword in hand, wiggling it back and forth as the enemy clocks you. Real swings and swipes, real defense and planning. This is the closest thing to swordfighting that any game has ever offered.
IGN Review said:
The new combat system requires skill and patience. Though impulsive, unpredictable waggling can get some results, most enemies are programmed to react to such behavior, and they'll punish you for it. On occasion my temper would get the best of me against an enemy, but swinging my remote faster didn't help. Some enemies anticipate your moves or use their weapons to block certain attacks, making routine fights far more challenging and complicated than in past Zelda games. None of your enemies are overtly difficult, but the added complexity, combined with more sophisticated puzzles and world designs, make each victory that much sweeter. What Ocarina of Time started with lock-on targeting, Skyward Sword perfects by adding layers of nuanced strategy. You'll rarely die, but you'll find yourself working hard to defeat and out-maneuver your opponents.
"A few camera and control issues"....frankly, I don't even know why this is listed, it seems like they tacked it on to make the cons list look longer.

Finally, as to that verdict about it being "The Weakest Zelda to date," well take a look at this:

GN Review said:
The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword is the best Legend of Zelda game...ever. Of course, that's my opinion, and there will be plenty of other opinions out there as well. If I'm going to come across with that line of thinking, I have to explain myself, don't I?

That's not a statement that should be made or taken lightly. I can understand how just starting my review with that thought is going to put some of you against this review. That's perfectly fine and I'm willing to deal with that. I may not convince you by the end of this review either. That's the way things are, but I feel so strongly with my opinion this time around that I will stand firm and not waver in my direction.

[Read Full GoNintendo Review]
IGN Review said:
The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword is the greatest Zelda game ever created. It's the best game for Wii and one of the finest video game accomplishments of the past 10 years. The game has once again raised the bar and forged new territory for an iconic and innovative franchise. It's not enough that it finally establishes a powerful, stirring origin story or that it features near-perfect pacing. What puts Skyward Sword over the top is its layered, dense, absolutely perfect gameplay that manages to not only nail motion-controlled combat but remarkably offers a stunning level of diversity.

[Read Full IGN Review]
Meristation Review said:
Timeless masterpiece. This Legend of Zelda takes over from Ocarina of Time. It's a step in the saga and a revolution in the design of third-person adventures. The Wii MotionPlus works perfectly, so the game is especially fun. A gift from heaven!

[Read Full Meristation Review]
Machinima Review said:
Not only one of the best Zelda games, but one of the best games ever made. It will take you places you've never been and show you sights you've never seen, so ignoring it just because it's on the Wii would be a dang shame.

[Read Full Machinima Review]
Digital Chumps Review said:
Skyward Sword is a masterpiece. It raises the bar for the legendary series and is memorable from start to finish. It's challenging, unpredictable, diverse, thrilling, and endearing. It is the Zelda game you've been waiting for.

[Read Full Digital Chumps Review]
ONM UK Review said:
Skyward Sword stands as an ode to a series that has endured all of recent gaming history. It marks the dizzying pinnacle of both the Zelda series and motion-controlled gaming itself. It's a huge accomplishment that, even by Nintendo's own record, stands out as one of their finest.

[Read Full ONM UK Review]
Destructoid Review said:
My new favorite 3D Zelda title, beating out Majora's Mask and Wind Waker by a substantial margin. It would be hard to go back to any of those games now. All of the gameplay innovations, emotionally involving moments, beautiful little details, and purely blissful experiences in this game have me completely and utterly spoiled.

[Read Full Destructoid Review]
Vandal Online Review said:
A must-have that demonstrates that Zelda is still in great form, and celebrates in the best possible way the 25th birthday of the series. As each Zelda game, it is outstanding. Not only one of the best games in Wii history, but also one of the best in the generation.

[Read Full Vandal Online Review]
Games Radar Review said:
A perfectly balanced mix of innovation and classic Zelda gameplay, Skyward Sword truly lives up to the Zelda legacy of excellence and offers the most variety of any Zelda game to date. Its swordplay and puzzles are some of the best in the series, and seeing Link and Zelda's first story chronologically is a treat for longtime fans.

[Read Full Games Radar Review]
Games TM Review said:
Zelda: Skyward Sword may be the swansong for the Wii, and may be overshadowed by a mere tech demo that showed Link in unrivalled detail on Nintendo’s next-generation offering. But it’s the game the Wii was born to run, and a Zelda game that showcases the kind of talent and ingenuity many seem recently to have entirely forgotten that Nintendo is really all about. Spellbinding, dramatic and absolutely epic in both the world it paints and the story it tells, Zelda: Skyward Sword is a hugely important event for the Wii, for Nintendo, and for anyone with even a passing love for the venerable series it celebrates. But overall, it’s an utterly essential videogame; a flash of fantastical brilliance in an increasingly commercial field of production line entertainment. Buffed and polished to a perfect point, Zelda: Skyward Sword is one in the eye for the naysayers, and a spectacular return to form for its developer; a solemn reminder that, when it comes to crafting worlds, nobody does it quite like Nintendo.

[Read Full Games TM Review]
Hopefully that's enough to reassure you and anyone else on that site who'd been discouraged by that review. I actually would recommend you to read the entire reviews though, as they go into much more detail than you can see from these quotations as to just why Skyward Sword has proved itself to them to be so groundbreaking. Their judgment may not be yours, but I think they attest to a pretty strong statement that with Skyward Sword, you'll be in for something truly spectacular.
 
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Joined
Feb 25, 2011
It doesn't matter about Game of the Year, 10/10s, 5/5s, #1 Game or whatever award.
It's about YOU. What do you think of the game? Why does it matter what THEY think?
sadly it's not.
today the success of a game that is not an FPS relay's heavily on it's reviews.
 

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