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Why Skyward Sword was better than Twilight Princess

Joined
Sep 21, 2014
Location
Michigan
There's a lot of things I liked more in Skyward Sword than Twilight Princess, art style is not one of them. One of the things I like doing in Zelda games is running around the map. This is WAY funner in Twilight Princess, especially Lake Hylia( so pretty).
Do you like fighting all the mounted bokoblins too?
 
Joined
Sep 21, 2014
Location
Michigan
I think that tedium is the biggest issue here. In my opinion at least, these pre-dungeon segments were the foundation of TP, and the downfall of SS. No one can deny that the high stakes horse battles and jousts, the Hidden Village shoot out, traversing the Gerudo desert /raiding the Bulblin camp and scaling the desolated Snowpeak were all epic and atmospheric-- nor state that rescuing Colin/Ralis, gambling for Midna's life, or restoring Ilia's memory weren't incredibly emotional and plot essential moments.

But who honestly wants to find all four kikwis when Zelda's a dungeon away? Or find all the key shards, or activate all the charges, or retread through a completed dungeon, or escort a cowardly and micromanaging robot up a dangerous mountain, or collect "tadtones"... Ugh. Bad memories. It just wasn't fun, the game became a monotonous and frustrating chore.

That's what it comes down to.
Duuuude… I'd blocked the dungeon retread and tadtones out of my memory… why you gotta go and open up old wounds, man?
 

Jirohnagi

Braava Braava
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Feb 18, 2010
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Soul Sanctum
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Geosexual
Skyward Sword failed on the character representations. You had Ghirahim who is meant to be a freaking Demon Lord be a spaz for most of it. The designs of most of the characters just didn't match up to TP. At least there the Foes such as Zant actually looked like a foe. Groose just looked ridiculous for the most part and the dungeon layouts really didn't work well with the ideas behind them. Only semi diffcult dungeon was the Sandship and that was mainly due to how the place was layed out. Need i even mention poor controls, requiring you to recalibrate every few minutes to compensate for the game not thinking the wii mote is where it should be.
 
As far as the two games go, I felt they fell into a lot of the same pitfalls.

It's been mentioned a lot before, but the long prologues to both games make getting into them or starting a new playthrough a hassle and unexciting. One of the reasons I think the likes of A Link to the Past and Ocarina of Time still hold up well to this day is that they thrust players into a dungeon within the first hour. The action starts off strong and never stops.

What really irked me about about Twilight Princess is that the first half of the story spent a great deal of time building up the kids from Ordon, especially, Ilia, only for them to be thrown away half way in. As far as Skyward Sword is concerned, I felt the denizens of Skyloft were oblivious to the danger Ghirahim and Demise presented. Groose and Gaepora were the only Skyloftians worth carrying about.

The Twilight Realms and the Silent Realms were also both poorly designed. Rather than enhancing the experience by adding new mechanics, they felt like they were there to stretch out the experience. The older 3D games lacked this exercise in tediousness.

As far as what the games did right, I felt that Skyward Sword was the more interesting title in terms of new themes and mechanics, while Twilight Princess had the superior atmosphere.

Whether or not you like SS's motion controls, they're still the best in the industry. No other Wii, Playstation Move, or Kinetic game has made as good a case for motion controls. The controls weren't perfect by any means, but I appreciated that Nintendo took a risk with one of its staple franchises.

Although I'm not a fan of SS's overworld in general, I love the Lanaryu Desert area. The time shiftstones were a clever mechanic. Plus, their guardians, the Ancient Robots, are my favorite Zelda race since the Gorons. The glimpses we see of their civilization offer more depth than we typically see from the series.

Twilight Princess, on the other hand, felt a lot more alive. A lot of the NPCs were aware of the looming danger the twilight skies foreshadowed. The Resistance were a particularly clever group of support characters. As far as the main cast goes, Midna and Zant (before his hallucinations) put on a very strong performance. The tension between them was palpable. And say what people will, Ganondorf in Twilight Princess is the most menacing and cunning he's ever been. The cutscene after the Arbiter's Grounds always gives me chills.

Truth be told, Zelda fans are a bit spoiled. Twilight Princess and Skyward Sword were definitely among the top five games released in their respective years. It just goes to show how high a benchmark the franchise has set.
 
Joined
May 4, 2014
Location
California
As far as the two games go, I felt they fell into a lot of the same pitfalls.

It's been mentioned a lot before, but the long prologues to both games make getting into them or starting a new playthrough a hassle and unexciting. One of the reasons I think the likes of A Link to the Past and Ocarina of Time still hold up well to this day is that they thrust players into a dungeon within the first hour. The action starts off strong and never stops.

What really irked me about about Twilight Princess is that the first half of the story spent a great deal of time building up the kids from Ordon, especially, Ilia, only for them to be thrown away half way in. As far as Skyward Sword is concerned, I felt the denizens of Skyloft were oblivious to the danger Ghirahim and Demise presented. Groose and Gaepora were the only Skyloftians worth carrying about.

The Twilight Realms and the Silent Realms were also both poorly designed. Rather than enhancing the experience by adding new mechanics, they felt like they were there to stretch out the experience. The older 3D games lacked this exercise in tediousness.

As far as what the games did right, I felt that Skyward Sword was the more interesting title in terms of new themes and mechanics, while Twilight Princess had the superior atmosphere.

Whether or not you like SS's motion controls, they're still the best in the industry. No other Wii, Playstation Move, or Kinetic game has made as good a case for motion controls. The controls weren't perfect by any means, but I appreciated that Nintendo took a risk with one of its staple franchises.

Although I'm not a fan of SS's overworld in general, I love the Lanaryu Desert area. The time shiftstones were a clever mechanic. Plus, their guardians, the Ancient Robots, are my favorite Zelda race since the Gorons. The glimpses we see of their civilization offer more depth than we typically see from the series.

Twilight Princess, on the other hand, felt a lot more alive. A lot of the NPCs were aware of the looming danger the twilight skies foreshadowed. The Resistance were a particularly clever group of support characters. As far as the main cast goes, Midna and Zant (before his hallucinations) put on a very strong performance. The tension between them was palpable. And say what people will, Ganondorf in Twilight Princess is the most menacing and cunning he's ever been. The cutscene after the Arbiter's Grounds always gives me chills.

Truth be told, Zelda fans are a bit spoiled. Twilight Princess and Skyward Sword were definitely among the top five games released in their respective years. It just goes to show how high a benchmark the franchise has set.


Ocarina has a fairly lengthy prologue too. You hafta wait for the dream sequence, deku tree speaking to navi, navi going to get link, link running around getting the kokiri blade and enough money for the shield, then comes the part where dear old deku drones on and on before you get to the first dungeon. I agree with you about ALttP though
 

Justac00lguy

BooBoo
Joined
Jul 1, 2012
Gender
Shewhale
Twilight Princess out did most of what Skyward Sword tried to offer in my opinion.

Graphic wise, I much preferred Twilight Princess' dark and gritty style and some of the set pieces where breathtaking for a game released on 2006. Skyward Sword was bright and vibrant, but a little too over-the-top for my desired preference. Concerning the controls, i felt SS was a failed experiment. Movements and education felt exciting and new on he early hours of the game, but after encountering the same repetitive motions time and time again, I just felt straight up bored. Skyward Sword did execute the aiming better, and I'll concede that Twilight Princess (Wii) controls were very basic in comparison; however, I prefer basic. Basic consoles work better with a better executed combat system, which is where TP excelled.

The big thing for me though, was the overworld. Skyward Sword is so linear that I wouldn't even call it an open world. You have a very lacklustre hub world (the Sky), which connects to what essentially is three levels (Eldin, Faron, Lanayru). The actual content within each province was fine, much better than TP; however, the compact areas made you feel trapped and served to push the notion that Skyward Sword's world was disconnected. You can complain about TP being barren, but that isn't exactly a negative. Open worlds, should, well, be open. Having a good contrast between empty areas and areas filled with content is what a open world game should strive for. I'll give a few examples: Fallout, Elder Scrolls, Shadow of the Colossus. Plus the actual world had a lot to do; multiple caverns to explore, enemies to face, rupees to collect, hidden treasures to find, golden bugs, Poes during the night, so I'm pretty confident when I say Twilight Princess had a much better overworld than Skyward Sword.

Dungeons is another big point. Twilight Princess had a contrast of good, mediocre and some pretty great dungeons, while Skyward Sword focused on innovation and visual design. This lead to a lack of content in the dungeons (apart from the excellent Lanayru Mining Facility). In my eyes, a dungeon should be huge and take around 1-2 hours to complete. You should get lost in its sheer overwhelming labyrinth and confusing puzzles. SS had some great looking dungeons with intriguing ideas, but the experience would be over in like 20 minutes, which created this underwhelming feeling. I will admit though, Skyward Sword showed TP and the entire Zelda series on how dungeon bosses should be done.

I could go into some of the finer aspects such as the characters, villains, locations, story etc. However I think a lot of this comes down to your interpretation of what a Zelda game should be and I felt TP, while having a lot of flaws, it showcased where I would like to see the series go.
 
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JuicieJ

SHOW ME YA MOVES!
Joined
Jan 10, 2011
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On the midnight Spirit Train going anywhere
As far as Skyward Sword is concerned, I felt the denizens of Skyloft were oblivious to the danger Ghirahim and Demise presented.

What did you expect? They never went to the surface, they never saw the tornado. They never experienced any danger, so why would they have a reason to believe the was any? I also find it very odd that you mention this, yet ignore the fact that people in Twilight Princess never knew what was going on, either.

The Twilight Realms and the Silent Realms were also both poorly designed. Rather than enhancing the experience by adding new mechanics, they felt like they were there to stretch out the experience. The older 3D games lacked this exercise in tediousness.

They're sections designed to break up the pace and add some variety to the game design so that it's not just going from dungeon to dungeon, and they did add new mechanics because they're drastically different than the rest of the game. There's nothing inherently wrong with that concept, as they add some spice to the experience.

Now, the Twilight sections could have been more engaging (though I wouldn't call them bad), but the real problem is that they're such a major part of the game, but then they're dropped after the first half, basically serving no significance to the game overall. The Silent Realms, on the other hand, are introduced after the second half, which adds an extra dynamic in rather than taking one away, and they're some of the most intense sections in the series; you have no method of defending yourself, and you have to get from tear to tear within 90 second intervals so that the Guardians don't wake up (all while avoiding the Watchers & Waking Water), and if you get hit by a Guardian, you have to start all over. It's legitimately creepy, and it's all only exacerbated by the other-worldy atmosphere and Silent Hill-like music when the Guardians awaken.

Also, every 3D Zelda has different objectives to complete in-between dungeons, especially Majora's Mask, which is arguably the best game in the series.
 
Joined
Sep 21, 2014
Location
Michigan
As for the Silent Realm Trials, I actually didn't mind them. I mean they were different compared to the rest of the game, and good god were they tense. Some people don't like that, but you can't argue that they certainly had you engaged in what you were doing.

But, a lot of people think they were tedious and I think I know why: they didn't give you a good reason to do them. Let's say if you earned some little thing at the end of them, something that made sense, instead of just saying that "you have to prove you're the hero" garbage. The reason I suggest that is because by the third time you have to do them you're like "OKAY ENOUGH I'M ALREADY THE FREAKIN' HERO YOU DON'T NEED ME TO KEEP PROVING IT ARE YOU STUPID!?" Just calling it that makes the act feel more tedious than it actually is. They should have come up with a different reason, because apparently a rose by a certain name really is more irritating. (also I take umbrage with the phrase "a rose by any other name would smell as sweet", because calling something a "Poopintooter" is likely to bias the imagination a bit.)
 

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