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Which Book Are You Currently Reading?

Batman

Not all those who wander are lost...
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Location
40 lights off the Galactic Rim
Gender
Dan-kin
"Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel", by Michio Kaku.

One of my all time favorite books. This one basically looks at some of the most interesting science fiction technologies as they've been presented in the history of SF (everything from H.G. Wells to Isaac Asimov, Star Trek, Star Wars, Doctor Who, Back to the Future, and so on) and speculates, based on our current understanding of the laws of physics and research that's already underway dealing with these ideas in their infancy, if/when such technologies might actually become reality.
 

Beauts

Rock and roll will never die
Joined
Jun 15, 2012
Location
London, United Kingdom
'Storm of Swords Part I', Game of Thrones series by George R.R. Martin

Also 'About A Boy' by Nick Hornby

I always have 2 or 3 books on the go. It keeps my mind fresh and open.
 

Curmudgeon

default setting: sarcastic prick
Joined
Dec 17, 2012
Gender
grumpy
Kathleen Brown - Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, and Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia
Cobble, Gordon, & Henry - Feminism Unfinished: A Short, Surprising History of American Women's Movements
 
Joined
Jul 18, 2015
Gender
cat
Think Like a Freak by Stephen J. Dubner and Steven D. Levitt
The First Family Detail by Ronald Kessler

Just ordered a copy of Steve Silberman's NeuroTribes. Should be a good read.
 

Curmudgeon

default setting: sarcastic prick
Joined
Dec 17, 2012
Gender
grumpy
William Cronon - Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England
 
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Curmudgeon

default setting: sarcastic prick
Joined
Dec 17, 2012
Gender
grumpy
Anne Valk - Radical Sisters: Second-Wave Feminism and Black Liberation in Washington, D.C.
 

Batman

Not all those who wander are lost...
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Location
40 lights off the Galactic Rim
Gender
Dan-kin
"Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100", by Michio Kaku.

Very similar to his previous book Visions, but it's far more up-to-date and tackles the deeper future in much more detail. From artificial intelligence and transhumanism to the future of transportation, economics, nanotechnology, computing and much more, this book is by far Kaku's most extensive book on 21st and early 22nd Century futurism, covering everything you can think of in a really concise and informed way. He interviewed over 300 of the world's top scientists and engineers from around the world that are currently building the initial stages of the future he lays out, and if what he discusses even remotely comes to fruition, those of us alive right now have potentially a very exciting future to look forward to. One of my favorite books and I highly recommend it to anyone interested in what modern science has to say about future technology and how it will alter everything it means to be human.
 

Batman

Not all those who wander are lost...
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Location
40 lights off the Galactic Rim
Gender
Dan-kin
"The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind", by Michio Kaku.

I'm finally at the end of Kaku's books. This is his latest book, and after this I plan to probably read some of Ray Kurzweil's books on futurism.

This one is very similar in spirit with his other futurism books, but it focuses almost exclusively on the human brain and mind. He discusses the latest discoveries going on in neuroscience and how the future of science and advanced technology will radically alter the brain and mind. Modern science is not only revealing more and more about the secrets of the brain and consciousness, but also producing the beginning stages of technologies that will give us the power to create truly conscious artificial intelligence, cure mental illnesses, record dreams, upload our minds into computers, and much more. The thing about this book that I most love is Kaku's take on the problem of consciousness, which I think is super satisfying philosophically and very thought-provoking on issues such as transhumanism and AI.
 

Curmudgeon

default setting: sarcastic prick
Joined
Dec 17, 2012
Gender
grumpy
Peter H. Wood - Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 through the Stono Rebellion
Anne Enke - Finding the Movement: Sexuality, Contested Space, and Feminist Activism
 

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