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USA Raising Federal Tobacco Purchasing Age to 21

el :BeoWolf:

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18 should be the age for everything, the inconsistency is stupid like everyone before has said. Plus most people graduate highschool and enter the real world at 18. It seems silly to still have restrictions still at that point.
 

Jack Slothington

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I'm just curious how this bill affects those between the ages of 18 and 21 who are already smokers. Are they just expected to quit cold turkey now that they're suddenly not legal anymore? That's pretty ridiculous because, though I'm not a smoker myself, I know how addictive it is and how intensely difficult it can be to quit.
 

Giri

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I'm just curious how this bill affects those between the ages of 18 and 21 who are already smokers. Are they just expected to quit cold turkey now that they're suddenly not legal anymore? That's pretty ridiculous because, though I'm not a smoker myself, I know how addictive it is and how intensely difficult it can be to quit.
While it might be hard for addicted people, the future generations might be benefiting from this.
They obviously want more quality in human resources. Also 18 is not the age a man becomes completely mature that's why the legal nuptial age is 21 here. Since the act was passed there was significant decrease in no of divorce cases but however it's a bit higher now due to lifestyle changes or whatever.
So basically, at 21 years a man might be clearer with decisions.
About the addicted people
that sure ought to help.
 

Castle

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One of my best friends was a bronze star recipient at the age of twenty during his time as an infantryman. According to the law as it is now, he isn't legally old enough to stop in a gas station and buy a pack of cigarettes.
Your friend has done a great service for himself and for his country, and one can easily assume that he knew what he was doing when he joined up.

He also put himself at risk for all that. The choice had an upside and a downside.

And I certainly acknowledge the irony of someone as experienced and respected as a combat veteran being legally prohibited from simply purchasing items from a grocer.

Cigarettes are entirely harmful, however. There is no upside to nicotine addiction. Their therapeutic properties aren't even of use, since there are healthier ways to manage stress and nicotine actually creates stress via withdraw symptoms to perpetuate the addiction.

Nicotine items also have an effect on poverty. Consider how much a person will spend on nicotine items in their lifetime.
It also drives up insurance costs and puts an additional strain on healthcare. Many health insurers charge higher premiums for smokers.
Second hand smoke is also dangerous to those in the vicinity of smokers.

Despite all that, I am ultimately still largely pro choice in all matters - but only if the only harm being done is to the individual making the choice. I'm just seeing the situation as it is. I would be lying, however, if I said I wouldn't be glad to see cigarettes and other nicotine items gone for good. I also know that'll never happen.
 

Bowsette Plus-Ultra

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Your friend has done a great service for himself and for his country, and one can easily assume that he knew what he was doing when he joined up.

He also put himself at risk for all that. The choice had an upside and a downside.

And I certainly acknowledge the irony of someone as experienced and respected as a combat veteran being legally prohibited from simply purchasing items from a grocer.

Cigarettes are entirely harmful, however. There is no upside to nicotine addiction. Their therapeutic properties aren't even of use, since there are healthier ways to manage stress and nicotine actually creates stress via withdraw symptoms to perpetuate the addiction.

Nicotine items also have an effect on poverty. Consider how much a person will spend on nicotine items in their lifetime.
It also drives up insurance costs and puts an additional strain on healthcare. Many health insurers charge higher premiums for smokers.
Second hand smoke is also dangerous to those in the vicinity of smokers.

Despite all that, I am ultimately still largely pro choice in all matters - but only if the only harm being done is to the individual making the choice. I'm just seeing the situation as it is. I would be lying, however, if I said I wouldn't be glad to see cigarettes and other nicotine items gone for good. I also know that'll never happen.
Oh, I'm not disagreeing with the notion that things like cigarettes and alcohol are harmful. They are, and in an ideal world things like cigarettes and chewing tobacco would be pulled from the market. Unfortunately, that's just an ideal world.

I just don't like the moving goalpost of adulthood. If someone is of the age where they can enlist in the military, take a life, and die for their country, then they are an adult, and are old enough to do everything that being an adult entails—bad decisions included.
 
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Rubik

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I'm just curious how this bill affects those between the ages of 18 and 21 who are already smokers. Are they just expected to quit cold turkey now that they're suddenly not legal anymore? That's pretty ridiculous because, though I'm not a smoker myself, I know how addictive it is and how intensely difficult it can be to quit.
Generally how they implement this is to have anyone currently allowed to smoke grandfathered in. That's how it was when they raised the smoking age to 21 here.
 

Jack Slothington

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Generally how they implement this is to have anyone currently allowed to smoke grandfathered in. That's how it was when they raised the smoking age to 21 here.
So it really depends on whether or not you turned 18 before the bill was implemented? That seems like a good way to do it actually.
 

Rubik

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How would you enforce that sort of thing?
You show your ID at the store and the date of birth you're required to have to buy it legally stays the same for 3 years (instead of changing daily like it currently works) and then after that it's essentially just the normal system.
 

Doc Jekyll

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Generally how they implement this is to have anyone currently allowed to smoke grandfathered in. That's how it was when they raised the smoking age to 21 here.
From what I remember, there was no grandfather clause for this smoking law.
 

Bowsette Plus-Ultra

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You show your ID at the store and the date of birth you're required to have to buy it legally stays the same for 3 years (instead of changing daily like it currently works) and then after that it's essentially just the normal system.
I mean how do you enforce the grandfathering and allowing people under twenty-one who smoke or dip to continue buying tobacco?
 

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