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"This is Gay"

Keeseman

Smash is Life
Joined
Sep 23, 2012
Location
Beijing, China
You can be tough, patriotic and awesome AND be gay.
Okay, but my point there was that he was using that to insult me, my nation, the sport, and homosexuals. I should have put the word "gay" in quotation marks there to show how he was using it in a derrogatory sense- simply saying something is gay without truly understanding the real meaning of the term- instead of allowing the interpretation of me saying that homosexuals can't play hockey. That wasn't my point- and I would agree with you on yours.

There's no need to hate on someone or something because you don't like it, while simultaneously hating on a group of people like homosexuals- who are people like everyone else.
 

Sir Quaffler

May we meet again
Honestly it just seems like a figure of speech to me, used by teenagers. It's just a shorthand way of saying something is stupid or foolish, kind of like calling something "retarded". I realize that some people may take offense to these terms but the vast majority of the time when it's used it's not actually saying they think something or someone is actually homosexual or mentally handicapped, they just generally don't like something. Why those specific terms are used I don't really get, but some people are honestly too uptight about this kind of stuff.

It's just a way of saying things now (which I'm also sure will fade out sometime in the future), and it seems harsh to force someone to change their manner of speech to appease other people. Like saying "I see" when talking to a blind person. You're just saying that you are in agreement with a sentiment of theirs, you aren't actually making a jab at their lack of vision. I'm sure homosexuals don't take offense to the term "gay" now either, as they are secure in their sexuality, so why should we be so uptight about it?
 
Honestly it just seems like a figure of speech to me, used by teenagers. It's just a shorthand way of saying something is stupid or foolish, kind of like calling something "retarded". I realize that some people may take offense to these terms but the vast majority of the time when it's used it's not actually saying they think something or someone is actually homosexual or mentally handicapped, they just generally don't like something. Why those specific terms are used I don't really get, but some people are honestly too uptight about this kind of stuff.

It's just a way of saying things now (which I'm also sure will fade out sometime in the future), and it seems harsh to force someone to change their manner of speech to appease other people. Like saying "I see" when talking to a blind person. You're just saying that you are in agreement with a sentiment of theirs, you aren't actually making a jab at their lack of vision. I'm sure homosexuals don't take offense to the term "gay" now either, as they are secure in their sexuality, so why should we be so uptight about it?
Instead of saying something myself, I will leave it to an actual homosexual to state it for me:

"The use of “gay” as an insult is an issue that’s important enough to take a stand on even if it does cost us potential allies. When we tell people that it’s hurtful and harmful for them to use the very word we’re named as a synonym for anything and everything that’s negative and dislikable, that is a matter of basic respect. It is probably about as basic as this can possibly get: don’t use who we are to mean something bad. Taking a minority group’s name for your own use as an all-occasions pejorative is not merely disrespectful – it’s just about the most obvious way that you can tell us, “WE THINK WHAT YOU ARE IS BAD.”

If that isn’t what you mean to convey, then you need to stop using language in such a way that you openly associate the very names of minorities with everything you dislike. This goes beyond merely implying that gay people are bad. It’s tantamount to stating it outright. Is it okay to say that someone “Jewed” you out of something? Or that something that isn’t working must be “n*****-rigged”? Would any amount of “I didn’t mean it like that” rationalization make that alright? No one should ever think this is acceptable, yet so many people are under the impression that it’s a-okay to do this to gay people. Why? Because it’s a more recent development in language? Because social disapproval of this usage isn’t widespread enough yet? Because they just really like using the word? It doesn’t matter. It’s not okay.

If being asked to stop using our identity as an insult is all it takes to alienate potential allies, let me make it very clear that I do not care. I do not intend to sacrifice my own self-respect just to gain the support of people who can’t even bring themselves to listen to us and respect us in this most basic and minimal way. Are those the allies we want? Can they even be called allies in any meaningful sense?"

I am sorry SQ, but there is no excuse for the usage of that term. It is nothing short of derogatory and hateful. Try growing up gay and hearing who you are used as an insult your entire life and I am dead-sure you would feel different.
 

Sir Quaffler

May we meet again
Eh, I've been insulted and chastised my entire life. Not in the same terms as a gay person, mind you. But I just learned to develop a thicker skin so that no insult may be able to hurt me.

I'll concede that the way some people use these terms are in fact meant as a direct insult to someone's heritage and/or lifestyle, and that is just rude. But it's unbecoming to get riled up every single time someone says the word "gay".

In other words, yes there needs to an effort to stop the utter disrespect of people like this. But at the same time certain people simply need to develop a thicker skin.
 

penguinboy82

Nature's troll
Joined
Mar 17, 2010
Location
Pacific Northwest
I really hate it when people use the word gay as an insult, and I mean hate. It seriously bothers me. Even if my religion is against gays and being gay (I don't mean to bring religion into this), I do not think it should ever be used offensively. I myself have been trying to get my friends to stop saying it, but it's so natural now, I don't think the use of the word this way is going anywhere any time soon.
 

Jimmu

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I also think its wrong to use the word "gay" as an insult. It's associating gay with being wrong, this just adds to the large amount of hate that homosexual people get so this may not just feel like a joke to them. This day in age I would imagine that some homosexuals would feel that almost everyone is against them (as the insults heavily outweighs the support, especially in school) and this just adds to that feeling. It's easy to say get "thick skin" when you haven't been feeling like so many people (much or the would) hate you, after being teased for many years and getting called things such as a "disease" it can really do some psychological damage. Using the word "gay" rather than something like "lame", is taken as hate but unfortunately people are not going to stop using this, this can be a contributing factor to the psychological damage.
 

Cel-Shaded Deku

Ha ha, charade you are!
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Rapin' your churches, burnin' your women!
Words evolve. Gay used to mean happy and fag used to mean a bundle of sticks. Probably 99.99% of the time there is no intention of insulting homosexuals. The common meanings today seems to be stupid or a masculine thing that is girly, as well as homosexual. A word can mean two things at once without the meanings interconnecting. Just get over it and stop being offended by morons using a random assortment of every word they're told not to use in a fit of anger.
 

Jimmu

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So if many people used "bible boy" instead of idiot it would be ok then?
I don't think that's ok but if if you support the use of the word "gay" as an insult you support the use of "bible boy" as an insult also or you are just being biased towards Christianity.
 

Sir Quaffler

May we meet again
So if many people used "bible boy" instead of idiot it would be ok then?
I don't think that's ok but if if you support the use of the word "gay" as an insult you support the use of "bible boy" as an insult also or you are just being biased towards Christianity.
Hehe, Bible boy, yeah that'll catch on.
But to address this comment, sure let them throw whatever insults they want. I know they're wrong and so their insults cannot hurt me. The people who use comments as "gay" or "bible boy" in a derogatory fashion aimed at their respective targets are idiots who do not deserve to be talked to on an equal level.

What I'm saying is, the people who choose to live a certain lifestyle, whether it be Christianity or homosexuality or what have you, need to be prepared to handle opposition. Don't expect pity from the enemy, they only want to bring you down. Learn to disregard these troglodytes, and they can never harm you with their words.
 
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Jimmu

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Sir Quaffler said:
What I'm saying is, the people who choose to live a certain lifestyle, whether it be Christianity or homosexuality or what have you, need to be prepared to handle opposition. Don't expect pity from the enemy, they only want to bring you down. Learn to disregard these troglodytes, and they can never harm you with their words.
1. People don't generally "choose" to be a homosexual, I have homosexual friends and they have told me that thay have always been since they were born.
2. Pity? Why the hell should they need any pity, they shouldn't need it at all if they were seen as the humans that they are by everyone. So people that are constantly bullied for being overweight don't deserve pity or support either?
3. After being hated by many, many people words CAN harm you. Take a look at this article:
Here is just the introduction:
In the wake of several tragedies that have made bullying a high-profile issue, it’s becoming clear that harassment by one’s peers is something more than just a rite of passage. Bullied kids are more likely to be depressed, anxious, and suicidal. They struggle in school — when they decide to show up at all. They are more likely to carry weapons, get in fights, and use drugs.

But when it comes to the actual harm bullying does, the picture grows murkier. The psychological torment that victims feel is real. But perhaps because many of us have experienced this sort of schoolyard cruelty and lived to tell the tale, peer harassment is still commonly written off as a “soft” form of abuse — one that leaves no obvious injuries and that most victims simply get over. It’s easy to imagine that, painful as bullying can be, all it hurts is our feelings.

A new wave of research into bullying’s effects, however, is now suggesting something more than that — that in fact, bullying can leave an indelible imprint on a teen’s brain at a time when it is still growing and developing. Being ostracized by one’s peers, it seems, can throw adolescent hormones even further out of whack, lead to reduced connectivity in the brain, and even sabotage the growth of new neurons.

These neurological scars, it turns out, closely resemble those borne by children who are physically and sexually abused in early childhood. Neuroscientists now know that the human brain continues to grow and change long after the first few years of life. By revealing the internal physiological damage that bullying can do, researchers are recasting it not as merely an unfortunate rite of passage but as a serious form of childhood trauma.
 

Sir Quaffler

May we meet again
1. People don't generally "choose" to be a homosexual, I have homosexual friends and they have told me that they have always been since they were born.
They may have been born with an affinity towards those of the same gender, but they still had to choose to follow through with it at some point. Just as I had to choose to actively pursue relationships with women, they had to actively pursue relationships with those of the same gender. The saying "It takes two to tango" is applicable here. And to stop some dissent, there are plenty of people who have willingly avoided any sexual relationships with anyone. It seems hard to do but they've done it. So don't say that they can't help themselves, we all can rise above our baser instincts.

2. Pity? Why the hell should they need any pity, they shouldn't need it at all if they were seen as the humans that they are by everyone. So people that are constantly bullied for being overweight don't deserve pity or support either?
Exactly, they're human beings. As such, they're going to be discriminated against at some point; it's just human nature and it happens to every one of us. It's a disgusting aspect of humanity, I'll freely admit, but it's there and we all have to deal with it. Everyone has enemies and those in opposition to them, it's just a fact of life. And that's not going to change no matter how hard people push to make homosexuality more accepted. The sooner these people realize this core fact of life, the better chance they have of developing into a fully-functional adult.

3. After being hated by many, many people words CAN harm you. Take a look at this article:
Here is just the introduction:
In the wake of several tragedies that have made bullying a high-profile issue, it’s becoming clear that harassment by one’s peers is something more than just a rite of passage. Bullied kids are more likely to be depressed, anxious, and suicidal. They struggle in school — when they decide to show up at all. They are more likely to carry weapons, get in fights, and use drugs.

But when it comes to the actual harm bullying does, the picture grows murkier. The psychological torment that victims feel is real. But perhaps because many of us have experienced this sort of schoolyard cruelty and lived to tell the tale, peer harassment is still commonly written off as a “soft” form of abuse — one that leaves no obvious injuries and that most victims simply get over. It’s easy to imagine that, painful as bullying can be, all it hurts is our feelings.

A new wave of research into bullying’s effects, however, is now suggesting something more than that — that in fact, bullying can leave an indelible imprint on a teen’s brain at a time when it is still growing and developing. Being ostracized by one’s peers, it seems, can throw adolescent hormones even further out of whack, lead to reduced connectivity in the brain, and even sabotage the growth of new neurons.

These neurological scars, it turns out, closely resemble those borne by children who are physically and sexually abused in early childhood. Neuroscientists now know that the human brain continues to grow and change long after the first few years of life. By revealing the internal physiological damage that bullying can do, researchers are recasting it not as merely an unfortunate rite of passage but as a serious form of childhood trauma.
Ok I'm not a neurologist, so I don't know the full details of the neurological aspect that bullying produces. I'll admit there's more of a point there.

But still, getting people to stop saying "that's gay" isn't going to make that go away. If you seriously want to stop the effects bullying has on homosexual teens growing up, you also have to tackle the even larger issue of why bullying takes place to begin with. It's not all one-sided; those bullying the others have some serious issues that have just as every right to be addressed as the bullied. That argument you make goes both ways. Forcing people to stop saying those certain phrases is a nice thought but ultimately pointless; you're skirting around the main issue at hand, and besides they'll just think of something else to say. Instead of badgering people to say things more politically-correct, you need to attack the very core of the problem.

Ergo, why do some people feel the need to make derogatory insults aimed at others' sexuality? Are they feeling insecure about their own sexuality? Are they being abused, discriminated, or have anger issues and have no other ways to vent? Is there a way we can stop the abuse not just on homosexuals in particular but on every abused person in general? I don't know, I still feel this is just a fact of life that we all have to deal with. It seems far too big a problem for anyone to defeat. Maybe I'm just being a cynical old *******, or maybe I'm being a realist about this.
 

Jimmu

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They may have been born with an affinity towards those of the same gender, but they still had to choose to follow through with it at some point. Just as I had to choose to actively pursue relationships with women, they had to actively pursue relationships with those of the same gender. The saying "It takes two to tango" is applicable here. And to stop some dissent, there are plenty of people who have willingly avoided any sexual relationships with anyone. It seems hard to do but they've done it. So don't say that they can't help themselves, we all can rise above our baser instincts.

Exactly, they're human beings. As such, they're going to be discriminated against at some point; it's just human nature and it happens to every one of us. It's a disgusting aspect of humanity, I'll freely admit, but it's there and we all have to deal with it. Everyone has enemies and those in opposition to them, it's just a fact of life. And that's not going to change no matter how hard people push to make homosexuality more accepted. The sooner these people realize this core fact of life, the better chance they have of developing into a fully-functional adult.

Ok I'm not a neurologist, so I don't know the full details of the neurological aspect that bullying produces. I'll admit there's more of a point there.

But still, getting people to stop saying "that's gay" isn't going to make that go away. If you seriously want to stop the effects bullying has on homosexual teens growing up, you also have to tackle the even larger issue of why bullying takes place to begin with. It's not all one-sided; those bullying the others have some serious issues that have just as every right to be addressed as the bullied. That argument you make goes both ways. Forcing people to stop saying those certain phrases is a nice thought but ultimately pointless; you're skirting around the main issue at hand, and besides they'll just think of something else to say. Instead of badgering people to say things more politically-correct, you need to attack the very core of the problem.

Ergo, why do some people feel the need to make derogatory insults aimed at others' sexuality? Are they feeling insecure about their own sexuality? Are they being abused, discriminated, or have anger issues and have no other ways to vent? Is there a way we can stop the abuse not just on homosexuals in particular but on every abused person in general? I don't know, I still feel this is just a fact of life that we all have to deal with. It seems far too big a problem for anyone to defeat. Maybe I'm just being a cynical old *******, or maybe I'm being a realist about this.
1. Why should they not choose to partake in a homosexual relationship? It's not hurting anyone else. That's just like me going out and just randomly deciding to enter a relationship with another man when I'm straight.

2. I agree that everyone is discriminated against at "some point" and you are right, it is discusting. But when it becomes much more than "some point" (pretty much multiple times a day) it is too much and it becomes very hard to just deal with it.

3. Of corse the saying "that's gay" is only a small part of the massive problem. I'm talking about this because that just so happens to be the topic of this thread. And yes I agree that there is seriously something wrong with the bullies an they also need to be looked into to as to their mental state.

4. I never said that I was going to stop them saying it, I merely said that I think it's wrong, that's my opinion and I have to respect the fact that you also have yours. In fact I said:
jimmy.f27 said:
unfortunately people are not going to stop using this
5. I'm not just against homosexual discrimination, I'm against most discrimination. Again homosexual discrimination is the focus of this topic.

6. It's important that everyone deserves an opinion, you do and I respect that and I do and I hope you give me that respect also. Some opinions can promote much hate though and while people can have these opinions they should not hate others with other opinions or bully the people that are "wrong" by their opinion. Eg. Homosexuals.

I think we are both on the same general track with this though, a few differences and missunderstandings though, but that's life.
 

Joy

The Sexy One
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Location
In your pants.
I don't like saying it because I don't want to offend anyone, but I don't personally find it particularily offensive. It's just a figure of speech.
 

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