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The Tree On The Moon-MM

BoxTar

i got bored and posted something
Joined
Apr 13, 2009
Location
Pacific Northwest
I'm sure this has been posted a million times, but I need to get this solved.
As we all know from MM, Link is sucked into the moon for the final battle with the Majora. Seen inside the moon is a single tree in the center of the field.

Now, I am not heavily religious, or religious at all for that matter, but I do know the story of the Garden of Eden. In the garden of eden, there is a large garden, parted by only a single apple tree. This tree beared the fruit of all knowledge. That is about all you need to know for this theory.

Strange, isn't it? How a game uses such an idea in their own story. Whether or not it was a coincedence is up for debate, but I would rather hear ideas or theories from others on this subject. Why would such an evil place resemble such a pure one?

Now, though I do know the story of Eden, I do not know the ENTIRE story. That being said, feel free to fill any holes in the story.
 

Xinnamin

Mrs. Austin
Joined
Dec 6, 2009
Location
clustercereal
I honestly doubt that the tree in the moon had anything to do with the Garden of Eden. The biblical myth had something to do with Eve getting corrupted by the tree's fruit (I think, I'm not religious either). The tree in the moon didn't even have any fruit, and the fruit was kind of important to the myth. There is honestly very little that connects that tree to the Garden of Eden (besides, correct me if I'm wrong, wasn't the Garden of Eden a huge overgrown garden and not just a vast flat field?).

I've always thought that the serenity of the moon's interior was a result of Majora's state of mind, in other words, I like to think that the inside of the moon changes according to Majora's will, thus explaining how the moon children could send Link into various mini-dungeon scenarios. I felt that the serene field reflected Majora's confidence in its own ability to succeed, thus a peace of mind, and also a childish pursuit of fun (since Majora seems to have a childish personality to me). The tree, I thought, symbolized a hidden insecurity: Majora's need for protection in order to keep a peace of mind, whether it was behind a mask, within a host, or surrounded by a grand tree. That's just me.

Of course, more realistically, I think the developers probably just chose that scene in order to shock the players with a sudden contrast. A sort of irony I suppose, that the hideous moon harbored such a beautiful field.
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2008
Location
Chula Vista, San Diego, CA
Hmm ... I'm not seeing the theory. Are you saying that Nintendo is basing this scene off of the Garden of Eden? Highly unlikely, they were many trees, many many trees, such as the tree bearing the fruit of the knowledge of good and evil (which you may be referring to, mistaking it for the fruit of all knowledge), and all the animals on Earth living in harmony. I only see one tree, and only four boys playing together (and a lonely one, but he doesn't matter much) Also, if they were basing anything off the Garden of Eden, they would make it much more significant.
 

Dungeon killer

Dungeon's Shall Fall!
Joined
Jul 9, 2009
Location
Destroying Dungeons.
Mainly I don't believe thet they where trying for that scene. I understand why your asking but I think it has no relation to it like preivously said there is, just a tree and some children. If it was it would have animals and a forest like landscape.
Good theory though.

~Dungeon killer
 

LozzyKate

Ask Me Why I Love The Photoshops
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Mainly I don't believe thet they where trying for that scene. I understand why your asking but I think it has no relation to it like preivously said there is, just a tree and some children. If it was it would have animals and a forest like landscape.
Good theory though.

~Dungeon killer
I agree with you. It is simply an area that was not going to be used as much as the others, so Nintendo basically didn't put much effort into area and its surroundings. I hope this helps you.
 

Skull_Kid

Bugaboo!
Joined
Sep 15, 2008
Location
Portugal
It is most certainly coincidence, as if there is a place in MM, or the Zelda series, to make almost a reference to religions is the Stone Tower.
The statues there are kinda sumerian.
 

Shadsie

Sage of Tales
I've not only read the Bible, I've studied it. Although I might warn about where I'm coming from. I used to be a literalist, but currently am one of those dirty, dirty off-kilter Christians who likes science/is friendly to the theory of evolution - I see the early chapters of Genesis as quite symbolic, still, to keep this from getting into Mature Disscussion territory - let's just say that my view has necessitated study of those scriptures, therefore I have a little authority to speak, I guess...

And... from my recollection of Majora's Mask, ... No. It didn't strike me as reflecting the Bible at all. You need more elements than just a tree upon a peaceful plane. I think the scenery in MM is more about a trannquil plane as a contrast to the chaos going on outside and in the rest of the game - a sort of "jarring peace."

For Biblical/Genesis symbolism here, you'd need more - such as fruit, such as an implication of a paradise lost... I mean, I can sit down with you to watch certain anime shows ( Trigun, Neon Genesis Evangelion, even Haibane Renmei) and can point out Biblical symbolism and possible Biblical inspiration, but not in Majora's Mask.

I can point out some things in other Zelda games and general Zelda, though... The Triforce relating to the idea of the Trinity, the crosses in the early games (mostly just being symbolic of death, though), the Great Flood in Wind Waker... but not so much MM.
 
N

Nathan

Guest
The entire ending of Majora's Mask is one of the best endings to any game, and also one of the most thought provoking, and at times, confusing. Keep in mind that the moon itself isn't actually evil, so whats inside it may have nothing to do with evil because the moon itself isn't even, it was Majora forcing the moon to fall, it wasn't a choice the moon itself had in the matter.

As for this particular scene, I never thought it encompassed the bible story. I was brought up christian and from what I have seen in the bible it wasn't the "only" tree in Eden... in fact... it was far from it. It just was the only tree that beared fruit that Adam and Eve were forbidden to eat. The scene was more of a surprising, yet touching scene. The Skull Kid sitting under the tree, the tranquilty of the whole thing, it came out of nowhere, and provided a fantastic ending to an amazing story. You really got to understand even more about the world because of it, and it's people.

Maybe I am the only person who got all that, who knows.
 
F

Forsaken

Guest
First of all, don't you think this should have some kind of "*CONTAIN SPOILERS*" warning? That actually spoils the whole game for those who haven't played it yet.

If you want to know, I don't think any of the LoZ games are anyhow related to Jesus Christ or religious matters but japanese or asian stuff.
Alright it might contain crosses or grave signs that remind catholicism, but nothing that looked strictly like the bible (intentionally meant to represent whatsoever) or anything else about it.
 

athenian200

Circumspect
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Location
a place of settlement, activity, or residence.
Actually, it reminds me more of that room in the Water Temple where you fight Dark Link.

I've always thought of the empty room with the tree as a sort of metaphor for reflecting inwards. The room involves a choice between talking to the lonely child who sits all alone, or playing a game with the kids who are having fun. If you play with all the kids who are having fun, and then talk to the lone child, it says "you will be playing the bad guy." Perhaps it's symbolic of how you, like all the others, have made him feel unwanted yet again... and somehow, creating a scenario in which you were a big bully who just stepped all over him again in order to feel vindicated was more important to him than winning after being neglected.

In other words, it's possible that the Fierce Diety's Mask is, ironically, Majora's idea of a punishment rather than a reward. Because it requires you to accept that you're in some way the bully, the bad guy from a certain perspective.

What's funny is, I've gotten all the masks in the game besides that one, because I can never bring myself to ignore that lone child... it just seems like the wrong thing to do. I've seen it in other people's playthroughs, though.
 

Octo Rocked

Dr. Octorokapus BLAAAAAH!
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Some people think of it as the less Christianity/Judaism-centric but just as symbolic "World Tree," which may have some relation to the Eden myth. The World Tree is evidently a giant tree through which all life is connected, or something. I'm still not sure if that's why it was, or if the "hill on a tree" trope was for purely aesthetic purposes. Either way, the Deku Tree is actually a better example of the World Tree.
 

Raven

Former Hylian Knight
Joined
Jun 8, 2009
Location
Halifax
This area of the game never really made sense too me, but i think that may be a part of the point they were trying to make. The tree on the hill in MM is so familiar yet out of place that it makes you stop and wonder where you are. and at the end of the world, how is it that you have come to this empty place. I believe the tree is outside of time (as we know it) because when you enter the moon the clock disappears and you now have all the time you need until you want to go face Majora. other than that I can't say too much about it other than it is a very curious area in the Zelda series and that It has a good chance of having some connection with the Tribe (from the back story) that previously kept the Mask..
 

Ikana

Trollkastel
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Dec 3, 2009
Location
Ikana Canyon
I highly doubt it they made it to be like the Garden of Eden.So what if there was a Tree that doesn't mean that its like the Garden of Eden.I never got why they made it like that I wanted it to be a scary scene but no they made it into this quiet peaceful area.
 

Locke

Hegemon
Site Staff
Joined
Nov 24, 2009
Location
Redmond, Washington
"I don't intentionally ever try to replicate a particular cultural element from a particular country." -Shigeru Miyamoto.
/thread

I think the "country" in this quote can be extended to "religion," as the question he is answering refers to Japanese culture or "mythology," which usually refers to religion.
PopularMechanics said:
PM: Speaking of Zelda games, they're obviously very popular in lots of parts of the world, and they have almost a mythological story, that resembles Greek or any old epic you look at. Was there anything particular from Japanese culture or mythology that was put into the story that might go over the heads of Americans?

SM: I don't really consciously do things like that or consciously sense those types of differences. Partly it may be because, even in Japan, we see lots of different types of movies from America where they have the types of armor and clothing that you see in a game like that. We also see a lot of Chinese movies, and Chinese armor. Ocarina, I think, maybe the visual style drifts more towards a Western fantasy style and art design, but I don't intentionally ever try to replicate a particular cultural element from a particular country.
source


Either way, I haven't beaten MM yet, but from what you described, it doesn't seem to have any resemblance to the way the Garden of Eden is described in the Bible.
 

Zemen

[Insert Funny Statement]
Joined
Nov 10, 2008
Location
Illinois
I don't think it was meant to be a reference to the garden of Eden. It probably would have been made more obvious than just showing a tree.

I highly doubt it they made it to be like the Garden of Eden.So what if there was a Tree that doesn't mean that its like the Garden of Eden.I never got why they made it like that I wanted it to be a scary scene but no they made it into this quiet peaceful area.
I understand the concept of wanting it to be scary, but keep in mind that the Moon, itself, was not an evil entity, it was just under the control of an evil entity so the fact that it seems peaceful makes sense to me since the Moon lived in peace with the Terminians prior to Majora showing up.
 

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