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Pondering Human Cloning

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I'll make this pretty brief. The first successful clone was of a sea urchin back in 1885. Since then other animals have reportedly been cloned (I've done little research to back the validity of this statement, but eh). I do know for certain that in 1996 a Sheep was successfully cloned, named Dolly.

Human cloning, as far as I'm aware, is a threshold yet to be cracked. If a human were cloned, however, what might that human be like? They will look like the person they were cloned after, but they wouldn't be exactly like that person, right? They will have their own experiences contributing to forge a unique personality. They would be their own person, and not just a second version of the same person.

This is all hypothetical of course, and perhaps it'd be better if we didn't begin to clone humans. I'm interested to hear thoughts on the matter, though.
 
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The clone would look like a close sibling or twin, and would share a lot of personality similarities with the original. But, depending on how the twin is raised, there would be easily-observed physiological and psychological differences by the time they reached adulthood.

Basically, you're copying the template the person was grown from, not the person themselves; while a large portion of our personality and physical appearance is predetermined, there is enough shaped by experiences to allow for two people grown from the same template to turn out quite different. These experiences will also include differences in brain structure, meaning the two will process the same data in slightly-different ways (incidentally, this is why personality between two people is impossible; a large portion of the human mind is hardware, not software, and the mismatch between software and hardware would result in someone suffering from severe brain damage at best, assuming it does not outright kill them).
 

Dizzi

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clones would be identical twins but evil...
 

Deus

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If they could clone human bodies and perform successful brain transplants humans could live much longer by placing an old brain in a young body. Provided the brain didn't get cancer or dementia, both of which may be possible to stop in the future, the brain could theoretically live for hundreds of years.

As for cloning fully functional humans. I am not sure what the real point of that would be.
 

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If they could clone human bodies and perform successful brain transplants humans could live much longer by placing an old brain in a young body. Provided the brain didn't get cancer or dementia, both of which may be possible to stop in the future, the brain could theoretically live for hundreds of years.
O_O wouldn't that be murdering an individual tho?

I imagine if we could clone people it would lead to a lot of genetic warfare, eugenics, and fighting along bloodlines rather than what we do now. Birth rates would likely fall.
 

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O_O wouldn't that be murdering an individual tho?

I imagine if we could clone people it would lead to a lot of genetic warfare, eugenics, and fighting along bloodlines rather than what we do now. Birth rates would likely fall.
Well I was thinking about just growing the required body or parts rather than actually creating a whole new person with a working brain and then taking that functional brain out. I'd say that would be murdering them in that case.
 
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If they could clone human bodies and perform successful brain transplants humans could live much longer by placing an old brain in a young body. Provided the brain didn't get cancer or dementia, both of which may be possible to stop in the future, the brain could theoretically live for hundreds of years.

As for cloning fully functional humans. I am not sure what the real point of that would be.
I think Mary Shelley wrote a book on why something like this is not necessarily a good idea.
 

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I think Mary Shelley wrote a book on why something like this is not necessarily a good idea.
That's because the good doctor used parts of different people's bodies to make a new body. I am suggesting cloning an individual or parts to replace those that have worn out. These would be genetically identical to the person using them.
 
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That's because the good doctor used parts of different people's bodies to make a new body. I am suggesting cloning an individual or parts to replace those that have worn out. These would be genetically identical to the person using them.
Eh. Genetics wouldn't be the issue. Nervous system mismatches would be the greater danger. There's a high risk of permanent, incurable dysphoria resulting from the mismatch between the nervous system of the brain and the nervous system of the body. The brain might constantly be getting data that it interprets as coming from a source that doesn't match its perception of what the body should be.
 

Deus

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Eh. Genetics wouldn't be the issue. Nervous system mismatches would be the greater danger. There's a high risk of permanent, incurable dysphoria resulting from the mismatch between the nervous system of the brain and the nervous system of the body. The brain might constantly be getting data that it interprets as coming from a source that doesn't match its perception of what the body should be.
That would be something for scientists to discover and work on. And would be one of the risks the patient would take. They'd most likely be dying anyway and this is potentially a lifesaver adding many years to a person's life. So it would be up to them if they chose to gamble.
 
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That would be something for scientists to discover and work on. And would be one of the risks the patient would take. They'd most likely be dying anyway and this is potentially a lifesaver adding many years to a person's life. So it would be up to them if they chose to gamble.
Dysphoria of below the level we are discussing often results in suicide when not corrected, so it is questionable if this would have any benefit as far as lifespan. You may just end up trading them dying one way for them dying another voluntarily. Very likely, all they would be doing is trading one hell for another.
 

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I hope this thread isn't too old and I can still reply to it.

I think that a human clone, or any clone for that matter, would be almost identical to it's source, but with some slight genetic mutations that happen naturally as any new organism comes into being; that's how evolution works and I don't think it would be any different when it comes to cloning.

Likewise, the clone would probably start out as a single cell. From what I know, the method scientists use to clone other animals involves taking the nucleus of one cell and putting it into an egg cell in which the nucleus has been removed. So if it were a human clone, it would have no memories and it would develop it's cognitive abilities starting from square 1.

I don't think that we should avoid human cloning altogether, but it's ethically risky. Clones are known to have more health problems and they don't age as well as normal organisms. Also, imagine if one day, after having been accustomed to a normal life, you find out that you are not a normal person with two parents, but some science project that lives to be studied.

I believe that we should perfect animal cloning, wait for more studies on this subject, and then start cloning humans.
 

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