• Welcome to ZD Forums! You must create an account and log in to see and participate in the Shoutbox chat on this main index page.

Example: Using traceroute to fix routing problems to websites that are still online.

athenian200

Circumspect
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Location
a place of settlement, activity, or residence.
Since I just had to do this with ZD just now, I thought I should tell others how to do it, because it's a very useful skill to have. Especially if your Internet is with Frontier like mine is, as they have really lousy default routing due to their inexperience with serving a wider area.

1. Check the website on a couple of many "Down for everyone or just me" sites with similar names. If it reports that the website is up, then you have a problem is somewhere between your end and the website's end. The website is not down.

2. Open a command prompt window using CMD on Windows, or a terminal program like XTerm on Linux/Unix.

3. Confirm that the problem exists at the routing level by using the ping command. If you get 100% packet loss and no replies, then it's definitely a routing problem. If you see something else appear here, your access issues may be related to something else.

4. Once you've confirmed that the website is not down, and that none of the packets are making it through, use the tracert command on Windows (or traceroute on Linux/Unix).

Here's an example of me doing this for ZD just a few minutes ago:

upload_2017-5-15_6-46-35.png

In this case, you can see that the problem was lag-102.ear3.Dallas1.Level3.net, as that's where it timed out. That means that one of Level 3 routing server is having issues. I know that Frontier uses Level 3 because that company reached out to them and offered them services because they were causing problems routing half of Dallas's Internet traffic through Chicago before. Anyway, traceroute simply tries to find another way around to the desired address. In this case, taking a different branch through Cogent's servers that are also at Level 3. Surprisingly, systems don't always do this by default, especially if the route was just working a few moments ago. Sometimes, it has to be forced.

It's worth noting that there is pretty much nothing a website can do about this. It's all up to the ISPs and Tier-1 Internet backbone providers, and peering agreements that are largely outside of everyone's control. But they do sometimes have issues. The route this generates isn't always the most efficient, but it's better than nothing.
 
D

Deleted member 84722

Guest
I would like to add that if you are doing this on a linux machine (or a mac), you may get different output from the commands, but the process is about the same.
 

athenian200

Circumspect
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Location
a place of settlement, activity, or residence.
Yeah, and there are also instances where this won't work. For instance, because it's failing at this point now, a point that's too close to the destination...

upload_2017-5-16_4-22-9.png

It's failing at xe-1-0-1.core222.ny01.as40244.net, the final hop, and apparently there's no route from there to Zelda Dungeon that doesn't include the broken node. And this kind of thing is why having a VPN is a good idea. It gives you more options to route to websites other than what your ISP provides. And in my case, that's really important, because Frontier is a joke.
 

Castle

Ch!ld0fV!si0n
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Location
Crisis? What Crisis?
Gender
Pan-decepticon-transdeliberate-selfidentifying-sodiumbased-extraexistential-temporal anomaly
Hm.. I wonder if this was anything like an issue I was having for a while, but not just with ZD and across all browsers.

my solution was to dump the dns cache from the command prompt: type "/ipconfig flushdns" (sans quotes) press RETURN restart your computer. worked for me.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top Bottom