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European Union Votes in Favour of Copyright Directive

Cfrock

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The European Parliament has voted 438 to 226 in favour of the Copyright Directive. The Directive will now face a final vote in January, which experts say is unlikely to be rejected.

Some links to the story (I've tried to pull these from a varied range of sources and would encourage anyone else to share links to more points of view):

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/press-room/20180906IPR12103/parliament-adopts-its-position-on-digital-copyright-rules

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-45495550

https://www.theverge.com/2018/9/12/17849868/eu-internet-copyright-reform-article-11-13-approved

https://news.vice.com/en_us/article/9kv5pa/eu-copyright-directive-vote-internet
https://news.vice.com/en_us/article/9kv5pa/eu-copyright-directive-vote-internet
https://gizmodo.com/european-parliament-approves-catastrophic-copyright-bil-1828992521

I didn't see a thread about this topic so decided to start one for people to discuss this legislation and the effect it may have on the internet.

Depending on who you hear about it from, it seems this Directive will either break the power tech giants like Google have to control the creative digital marketplace or it will give them more power to restrict what people see and how creators can support themselves with their work.

What do you think about this legislation? Is it a good thing or a bad thing, and what effect do you forsee it having on how the internet is used in the future?

Edit: Fixed one of the links (I linked to the BBC article twice by mistake)
 

Emma

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The Gizmodo article covers it pretty well. This is pretty disasterous and Spain already tried similar measures only for it to backfire. This could break the whole internet. You know what you just did there? Linking to those articles. On the new system they are trying to implement, someone has to pay a lot of money just for those links to be there. Meaning little sites like this couldn't exist anymore. And non-profit sites like any and all wikis, even Wikipedia, couldn't exist anymore. It's a very poorly thought out disaster.
 

Castle

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This measure exclusively serves the elite political establishment and their tech company masters and can only ever hurt and hinder everyone else. This is corporate political cronyism at its most base. Europe's politicians flat out stood up and said "F-k the lot of you, we're enforcing the rules to enrich ourselves to your detriment." There's not even a pretense of subtlety here. Europe's corporate and political establishment is so confident that they can get away with screwing over an entire continent that they didn't even bother to hide their intentions.

Why is it that self respecting Europeans continue to put up with this? Just wth are you people doing over there??? Get off you butts and give these wannabe totalitarians the what for before it's too late. Or at least assure me that this'll backfire or be undone without too much fallout for letting it happen in the first place.
 

misskitten

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This measure exclusively serves the elite political establishment and their tech company masters and can only ever hurt and hinder everyone else. This is corporate political cronyism at its most base. Europe's politicians flat out stood up and said "F-k the lot of you, we're enforcing the rules to enrich ourselves to your detriment." There's not even a pretense of subtlety here. Europe's corporate and political establishment is so confident that they can get away with screwing over an entire continent that they didn't even bother to hide their intentions.

Why is it that self respecting Europeans continue to put up with this? Just wth are you people doing over there??? Get off you butts and give these wannabe totalitarians the what for before it's too late. Or at least assure me that this'll backfire or be undone without too much fallout for letting it happen in the first place.
1) EU not Europe, my country not being part of EU made it not possible to even try to influence it when I did learn of this vote (the day before it was about to happen)
2) Two word comeback for Americans: Net Neutrality
 

Castle

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EU not Europe, my country not being part of EU made it not possible to even try to influence it when I did learn of this vote (the day before it was about to happen)
So, and this is an honest question, does this measure affect you where you live despite you and the rest of your country not having a say in the matter? Because that would be all sorts of messed up. If that's the case, then anyone who isn't an EU member ought to be concerned right now.

Two word comeback for Americans: Net Neutrality
What is it you're referring to here exactly? Because that issue is far too complex to boil down to two words with dubious meaning.
Are you referring to net neutrality as a whole or the title 2 repeal that took place recently?
Because the title 2 repeal is what's really the matter. Many people lack sufficient understanding of what it does, what effects on internet communication, content and regulation it really has and what its repeal means.

I'd hazard that in both net neutrality and article 13 there have been a lot of lies and misinformation spread that have lead people to false conclusions. It's a common tactic for political schemers to muddy the waters so people can't properly assess the situation (something that a lot of people are just straight up incapable of) and also to inflame their emotions to provoke them to that sweet sweet outrage.

But as far as I've been able to understand it, proponents of article 13 made no effort to even conceal the fact that it does nothing but serve the interests of big corporate copyright holders. Perhaps I am mistaken. It's so difficult to find solid information in this information age we live in.
 

misskitten

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So, and this is an honest question, does this measure affect you where you live despite you and the rest of your country not having a say in the matter? Because that would be all sorts of messed up. If that's the case, then anyone who isn't an EU member ought to be concerned right now.
I know as much as you do in regards to how this measure is going to affect me. I can imagine it will spread, though.

What is it you're referring to here exactly? Because that issue is far too complex to boil down to two words with dubious meaning.
Are you referring to net neutrality as a whole or the title 2 repeal that took place recently?
Because the title 2 repeal is what's really the matter. Many people lack sufficient understanding of what it does, what effects on internet communication, content and regulation it really has and what its repeal means.

I'd hazard that in both net neutrality and article 13 there have been a lot of lies and misinformation spread that have lead people to false conclusions. It's a common tactic for political schemers to muddy the waters so people can't properly assess the situation (something that a lot of people are just straight up incapable of) and also to inflame their emotions to provoke them to that sweet sweet outrage.

But as far as I've been able to understand it, proponents of article 13 made no effort to even conceal the fact that it does nothing but serve the interests of big corporate copyright holders. Perhaps I am mistaken. It's so difficult to find solid information in this information age we live in.
My point is that both the US and the EU have now made (different) moves that are definite threats towards the internet as we know it, and both things are likely to affect us all regardless of where we live. And asking Europeans what we are doing about this move by the EU is on par with the rest of the world asking Americans what they are doing about the repeal of Net Neutrality. In both cases it's a matter of people in power trying to regulate the internet rather than understanding its potential. Repealing Net Neutrality has the potential of killing innovation, hold websites and end users hostage unless they cough up more money. That isn't going to affect just American companies and end users in the long term, but rather all of us.

This EU vote has the potential of stifling internet communities themselves, making any form of derivative creation potentially illegal. And you can bet that the US is going to want to follow suit, dollar signs in the eyes.
 

Castle

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And asking Europeans what we are doing about this move by the EU is on par with the rest of the world asking Americans what they are doing about the repeal of Net Neutrality. In both cases it's a matter of people in power trying to regulate the internet rather than understanding its potential. Repealing Net Neutrality has the potential of killing innovation, hold websites and end users hostage unless they cough up more money.
On the contrary, opponents of Title 2 support its repeal. They look at what it did and concluded that it was actually needless, even detrimental to a free and open internet. You see, that's the thing and also my point. All this talk of "Net Neutrality" often conveniently omits mentioning Title 2 entirely. The "repeal" of net neutrality is actually just eliminating the Title 2 provision. Of course the powers that be would have us all believe that by repealing it the cronies have taken over the internet for their exclusive use. In effect, many argue that Title 2 already did that and that we're better off repealing it.

So what Americans did about it is repeal the Title 2 provision of net neutrality. Maybe that was a good thing. Maybe it wasn't. Maybe it's both good and bad to some degree or another.

But I have more knowledge of the whole net neutrality controversy than I do of Article 13, simply by virtue of the net neutrality thing taking place closer to home. All I've heard about the Copyright Directive is bad. But then again there are plenty of people who get that impression about net neutrality. I don't like to make the mistake of assuming I know more than I do. For all I know, "Article 13" is to "Title 2" what the "Copyright Directive" is to "Net Neutrality." After all, I've only ever heard the matter referred to as "article 13" till now.

But my question still stands, regardless. If Article 13 or Copyright Directive or whatever is so perilous, then what are Europeans going to do about it? I am legitimately concerned for Europe's well being right now. Even if I'm getting the wrong impression, many countries are in a bad way right now and allegedly totalitarian measures such as this don't seem to be helping matters.

I'm a man chiefly concerned with action. We can talk, debate, argue and be offended by all this until we're blue in our faces. I want to know what Europe intends to do to take back their internet.
 

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