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Complex storyline?

Should the upcoming zelda game(s) have a more complex storyline?

  • YES

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • NO

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0

Onilink89

Nyanko Sensei
Joined
Oct 18, 2007
Location
The Netherlands
Now some of you may check IGN for some news.
And this was also mentiond there.

the thing is, Miyamoto is know to put simple storlyines/plots in his games.
Same goes for zelda. Now i have read that many Zelda fans and even some staff of nintendo wants a more complex storyline for the next zelda. Miyamoto doesn 't really wants this.

So what do you think about this?
 

chrisbg99

OBEY THE FIST!
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Location
Fargo, ND
As long as it doesn't get in the way of the game play (as in long interruptions where you spend a lot of time not playing the game) it wouldn't bother me.
 
Joined
May 24, 2008
Location
In my house
Of course. Not too confusing that I don't understand, but something more, at least more than TP. Although I will still admit that story was pretty good.
 
Joined
Oct 28, 2008
well its a yes no for me like the storys in the past havent been all that bad but really i kinda want more in depth so i have to go with a yes on this one
 

kpllk

The future pro yoyoer
Joined
Sep 21, 2008
Location
Massachusets
I was the only person to vote no so far. I want the game to have a cool storyline like OoT but I hope the way it fits into the timeline is easy to figure out.
 

linkman8

True and Noble
Joined
Oct 17, 2007
Location
United States of America
Basically the storyline should have some depth to it. In the past, like in Ocarina of Time, or the original LoZ, the plot went as far as "The princess has been kidnapped, and you have to defeat Ganon". That's all well and good for those games.
However TP, even, had a bit more developed plotline. Sometimes I wish there was a bit more of it to immerse yourself into.
 

Twili123prince

"ZINGA-DINGDING"
Joined
Jul 13, 2008
Location
Canada.
They should have a future Zelda game that is huge, not just in adventure but in area, like who ever has played Metroid Prime, the levels are obviously massive in the game I think zelda should have massive levels like that. So it's a yes for me.
 

linkman8

True and Noble
Joined
Oct 17, 2007
Location
United States of America
I hate to say this but I think that Miyamoto's games are starting to show there age in terms of storyline.
I would disagree. Perhaps some are, but in a lot of cases, he's begun to make them gradually more complex. I mean, look at TP in comparison to OOT of ten years ago. Needless to say, TP has a more complicated storyline with a lot more factors involved in it.
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2008
Location
In my coffin
Gender
Non-binary
I would disagree. Perhaps some are, but in a lot of cases, he's begun to make them gradually more complex. I mean, look at TP in comparison to OOT of ten years ago. Needless to say, TP has a more complicated storyline with a lot more factors involved in it.
Miyamoto was not as involve in TP as much as some people like to think he is.
 

Onilink89

Nyanko Sensei
Joined
Oct 18, 2007
Location
The Netherlands
Miyamoto was not as involve in TP as much as some people like to think he is.
Its seems i'm not the only one who checks more info behind the zelda titles.
yes miyamoto was involved in TP but he was not the one leading the team to made TP.

Eiji Aonuma and Shigeru Miyamoto where the designers but the one leading the team was Eiji Aonuma.

Basicly, Nintendo of North America said to Eiji Aonuma that the sales of WW where sluggish.
So Eiji Aonuma told to Shigeru Miyamoto he wanted to create a realistic zelda game to appeal North America.

I can go on and on about how the game was made but, i don 't feel like typing the whole story.
 

Hanyou

didn't build that
Basically the storyline should have some depth to it. In the past, like in Ocarina of Time, or the original LoZ, the plot went as far as "The princess has been kidnapped, and you have to defeat Ganon".
Absolutely not. Ocarina of Time may have a simplistic story on the surface (many of the greatest franchises do--see Star Wars, Narnia, Lord of the Rings) but it does a great deal more with that story than any Zelda game that came before it. In fact, I would say that out of all the Zelda games, its story resonates with me the best because of its deceptive simplicity. What are cliches to some are acceptable archetypes to others, archetypes that, when properly used, enhance rather than detract from a story. Ocarina and its successor, The Wind Waker, both contain so many elements of the Hero's Journey (whether the plot developers realized it or not) that their coming-of-age stories follow mythological templates almost to the letter.

Again, do we begrudge Star Wars and Lord of the Rings for following these templates? No, because those templates work when they're developed in the context of a convincing world and mythology. Nintendo has proven on multiple occasions that the storylines of Zelda games are strengths and not weaknesses, because, though they do not write stories that are as complex as, say, Final Fantasy 6 (one of my favorite RPG's, in part because of its quality story), they write stories that are good nonetheless, and that directly involve the gamer. There's no reason to fix what ain't broke.

Nor do I think, for example, Twilight Princess' "complexity" was much better. In fact, I think that game was a textbook example of bad storytelling. The entirety of the story focused on one character who was mysterious for much of the game, major plot points (such as the children) simply dropped off and were unexplained, the danger was to the Twilight Realm (which we rarely saw) more than Hyrule, the mythology was poorly described through cryptic cut-scenes that cheated the gamer, the seemingly major villain turned out to be a silly minor villain, and some characters, such as Zelda, simply dropped in and out of the story without explanation as the plotting demanded. One or two of these would not have been so bad, and perhaps they all could have worked if they were well-developed, but they were not. I think Twilight Princess is one reason Nintendo should not attempt a more complex plotline unless they were prepared for it. Then again, Majora's Mask's story wasn't all that bad (even though I didn't like the game) and it was layered and complex. Perhaps they can manage.

And in the future? I think part of Zelda's charm is its simplicity, so I wouldn't object to another Ocarina or Wind Waker, so long as they kept things relatively fresh. The demands for more complexity fall on deaf ears. At the same time, however, I wouldn't mind the creators digging in, more frankly exploring some of the profound issues they've touched upon in earlier games (such as the Sheikah). There's a lot of potential there. In reality, it depends on quality of execution and on the game itself--on the sort of story Nintendo wants to tell. So long as it adheres to some Zelda conventions (the Hero's Journey is a must for me at least), they ought to feel free to at least give the gamer more hints as to Hyrule's history. Perhaps they can connect the timelines to unify the franchise. While I admire simplicity as someone who's major dictates a cursory understanding of old literature, I also understand that in the modern world, classic archetypes might not cut it.

I think one way they could develop it would be to follow the example of the Shenmue franchise, a personal favorite. The first game was a simplistic but effective revenge story, one we've seen a thousand times before in a thousand different martial arts movies. It still worked because it was well-presented and the characters were likable; in this way, I compare it with Ocarina. Its sequel called into question so many of the conclusions Ryo, the main character, had made in the first game that the direction of the plot shifted entirely, but it was a smooth enough transition that the gamer didn't realize until he reached that little cave at the end of the game that this quest was about much more than he intended.

I actually think Ocarina and most especially The Wind Waker (with the kidnapping of Link's sister and the subsequent discovery that his friend, Tetra, is Zelda) achieve this sort of progression. The key, then, is to develop and enhance it. Give evil its motive; give races nuanced and separate histories; call into question what we're fighting for (as the Shadow Temple in Ocarina managed to do). Ideally, keep it simple on the surface. Surprise us with plot twists we never thought possible but that, in the long run, make perfect sense and don't compromise what we loved about the game and characters in the first place. In the mean time, simplicity is not a bad thing.

I think Nintendo can manage if they play their cards right. All they need to do is develop the franchise's existing identity.
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2011
Location
Pocatello, ID
I think that the Zelda series is doing really well as it is.

I do not think that Nintendo needs to create a more complex storyline for a few reasons. First of all, when there is analysis is done on how all of the games fit together and make a more complex story when combined together. Second of all, the characters in a lot of the Zelda games give you more of an optional complex story if it is followed. This means that if someone wants to analyze the story in more detail all that has to be done is pay more attention to ALL of the characters and not just the current main quest ones. Thirdly, when the Zelda games are simplified they don't really seem to have much of a different story than any one of them before, but really there is a lot more going on then what is led to believe. For instance, in Skyward Sword at a broad look is very simple, but when you look at all of the symbols involved in the game there is so much more. I believe that the wing ceremony has so much symbolism that if taken apart it reveals the whole game. There are even more details in other parts, but yet it is simple. There are really multiple ways to explore each Zelda game. Simplistic or complex just matters on what the player wants to get out of the game.
 

TrueChaos

Defender of Hyrule
Joined
Oct 14, 2011
Location
Weymouth
that would be good but as long as it's not Killer 7 complicated

SERIOUSLY, i've completed that game 3 times and i still don't fully understand it
 

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