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Cleaning Game Discs

Onilink89

Nyanko Sensei
Joined
Oct 18, 2007
Location
The Netherlands
So i noticed that couple of my Wii games needs to be cleaned. Normally I used the soft cloth for cleaning my glasses and it worked, but this time it caused some smudges.

I'm planning to buy a CD-cleaning liquid and hope it will actually make my Wii games clean.

I googled around and i found the weirdest methods for cleaning a CD. Toothpaste, Car wax, Babysoap...sounds all kinda risky for me 0.o

So before i do anything radical that might cause scratches, i need some tips who has some experience with this issue.
 

Big Octo

=^)
Joined
Jul 2, 2011
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The
Though it sounds utterly rediculous, I've found putting a disc in a toilet(make sure it's clean) and then flushing it very effective.
 

Ronin

There you are! You monsters!
Forum Volunteer
Joined
Feb 8, 2011
Location
Alrest
I googled around and i found the weirdest methods for cleaning a CD. Toothpaste, Car wax, Babysoap...sounds all kinda risky for me 0.o
We've used toothpaste to clean off DVDs before and it ended up working quite well. Even helps remove some of the scratches somehow (I believe; you'll want to check up on that). Also Google how its needs to be applied. I'd use a very soft cloth with a smatter of toothpase, and be sure the fabric isn't rough. That might further scratch it rather than remove smudges, which you probably don't want.

If my advice gets your Wii games messed up then PM me and I'll mail the amount reparation money to Holland. :(
 
Joined
Jul 24, 2011
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Pennsylvania, USA
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When my brother and I told my uncle about using toothpaste, it destroyed his game. So I wouldn't advise using toothpaste. I would suggest glass cleaner like Windex or something.
 
Joined
Feb 23, 2011
The best way to clean a game disc is to prevent it from getting messy in the first place. Take very good care of your discs, as they are very delicate and prone to damage.

But if that is not effective, I suggest this:

The correct way is to use a cloth and clean it from the inside circle to the edge. NEVER from side to side
...for minor smears, marks, and stains.

It is NEVER wise to apply any kind of cleaner that is not of specified use on your discs. Scratches in particular are actually small trenches engraved into disc by a rough surface. As such, whatever substance being used in effort to try to "erase" them is futile, and can get trapped and ruin your disc. I believe there are viable methods of safely and effectively cleaning game disc, but such a method should be left to professionals.

Come to think of it, the Gamestop where I used to work repaired discs for a fee, but I have never seen a practical application of this during my time there.
 

Onilink89

Nyanko Sensei
Joined
Oct 18, 2007
Location
The Netherlands
Though it sounds utterly rediculous, I've found putting a disc in a toilet(make sure it's clean) and then flushing it very effective.
Its does not only sounds utterly ridiculous, its IS utterly ridiculous. o_O

The correct way is to use a cloth and clean it from the inside circle to the edge. NEVER from side to side
Yeah i think thats one of the most basic rules of cleaning a CD. But just to be certain, i googled around whats the best or safest method.
For now i will follow this method: http://www.ehow.com/video_2499_clean-cds.html


The best way to clean a game disc is to prevent it from getting messy in the first place. Take very good care of your discs, as they are very delicate and prone to damage.

...for minor smears, marks, and stains.

It is NEVER wise to apply any kind of cleaner that is not of specified use on your discs. Scratches in particular are actually small trenches engraved into disc by a rough surface. As such, whatever substance being used in effort to try to "erase" them is futile, and can get trapped and ruin your disc. I believe there are viable methods of safely and effectively cleaning game disc, but such a method should be left to professionals.

Come to think of it, the Gamestop where I used to work repaired discs for a fee, but I have never seen a practical application of this during my time there.
Well i went to a computer store and found the disc liqiud cleaning...stuff. In the package there was some kinda cheap looking gadget to clean your cd.


You spray the liquid on the disk, insert into this cheap prop and rotate it clockwise with the red handle. There is a small circle pad with micro fiber on the top and when you rotate it the disck and the small circle pad rotates because of a small gear. I tested it with an other disc first, but it cleaned it not exactly in cicles but more like a spiral.
Its clean but the whole spiral cleaning...i don't trust it. Just going to use a micro fiber cloth that i normaly use to clean my plasma TV.

I know that preventing is better then solving the issue. But some gamestores here remove the game itself from the casing and only display the casing until somebody buys it.

EDIT:
So the liquid stuff and the micro fibre cloth did the trick. The smudges are gone, but it was harder then i thought. First i applied the spray to the cloth, but after i cleaned it. It left some stripes, kinda like waterstains on a window. So i just sprayed the liquid directly to the disc, and just left if for 15 minutes like that. Then i wiped it off with the cloth. Now its looks shiny =)
 
Last edited:

Ventus

Mad haters lmao
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Does the disc play though, that's the question.

I personally found toothpaste to be an excellent solution, though it has a high possibility (?) of destroying your discs. I had a Soul Calibur 3 game disc that did not work whatsoever, but when I applied toothpaste to the disc, it worked through some of Tales of Souls and almost all of Soul Arena, including Quick Play. However, when I attempted the same trick to my Mario Party 6 disc, the game didn't work to my dismay. So, I would avoid toothpaste but it seemed to work off and on for me.
 

Onilink89

Nyanko Sensei
Joined
Oct 18, 2007
Location
The Netherlands
Don't know about you guys, but these games are my babies. I ponder too much when it comes to this =P
A console is easly replacable, but i can't say the same for the games.

Anyway, thnx for the tips all. For those who are curious what the effects are of a dirty or scratched disc. Here is a article i found.

5.2.1 Scratches on the Laser-Reading Side of CDs and DVDs
Scratches generally cross data lines or tracks on the disc, and how bad (deep and wide) they are will determine the extent of interference with laser focus on the data. Small or occasional scratches will likely have little or no effect on the ability of the laser to read the disc, because the data are far enough below the surface of the disc that the laser is focused beyond the scratch. This is comparable to the effect of a light scratch on a pair of eyeglasses; it does not markedly impair vision because the viewer's eyes are focused beyond it.

Even assuming a scratch is deep or wide enough to influence laser focus, error detection and correction coding in the disc drive can in many cases recover the misread data. However, scratches that are deep, wide, or bunched together can adversely affect the readability of the disc. These scratches can cause the laser to misread enough data to make error correction coding ineffectual.

While data errors generated from scratches that run outward from the center of the disc stand a good chance of correction by the error correction firmware, scratches running in the direction of the track, the same direction as the laser reads the disc, are more likely to cause uncorrectable errors. These uncorrectable errors are called E32 in the Red Book for CD specifications, and PO Error in DVD specifications.

If scratches are deep enough to damage the data or metal layers on the reading side of a disc, the data cannot be read or repaired.

5.2.2 Scratches on the Label Side of CDs
Scratches on the label side of CDs can be a more serious problem. Because the reflective metal layer and data layer are so close to the surface of the label side of the disc, they can be damaged very easily. A slight indentation, or pinhole in the metal from a scratch, pen, pencil, ultrafine marker, or other sharp object will destroy the reflectivity of the metal in that area on the other side (laser reading side) and the readability of the data by the laser. This type of damage cannot be repaired.

As with scratches on the laser-reading side, optical disc drives are usually able to read through minor damage easily, even if the damage is caused from the label side. The difference is that this damage is permanent. If the error detection and correction firmware in the disc drive cannot correct the data, it will not be recoverable. Scratches that do not reach through the thin protective lacquer coating should have no immediate effect but may ultimately expose the metal to moisture, air pollutants, or other adverse environmental influences.

Adhesive labels (see page 23), though also somewhat vulnerable to adverse environmental influences, can provide CDs with extra protection from scratches. The extra layer on printable discs likewise offers protection.

5.2.3 Scratches on the Label Side of Single-Sided DVDs
Scratches on the label side of single-sided DVDs are not likely to pose a problem. The metal layer so prone to damage in CDs is in the middle of DVDs. Its location makes this layer almost impervious to surface scratches; it is in fact unlikely to be affected by any but the deepest scratches—those deep enough to reach the center of the disc where the metal and data lie.

5.2.4 Fingerprints, Smudges, Dirt, and Dust
Fingerprints, smudges, dirt, or dust on the laser reading side of the disc can disrupt laser focus on the data even more than a scratch can. Dirt or dust on the disc will block or reduce the light intensity of the laser. If severe enough, it will cause the disc drive to miss data as the disc is being read. Fingerprints, smudges, or dirt cover wide areas of data and will cause the laser beam to go out of focus or lose intensity. They will also cause widespread misreading of data along the data lines or tracks, to an extent that exceeds the error correction capability of the disc drive. Dust can also spin off into the disc drive and collect on the laser head or other internal components. Fingerprints, smudges, and dirt are easier to remove than scratches; it is simply a matter of cleaning them off.

To summarize, the effects of scratches versus fingerprints and smudges on the laser reading side of a disc include the following:

Occasional fine scratches will typically not affect the focus of the laser.
Deep scratches can affect the focus of the laser and cause errors.
The error detection and correction coding system in the disc drive will correct many errors caused by scratches.
Fingerprints and smudges can cause more errors than scratches and are more likely to overwhelm the error correction coding system capability.
Scratches in the direction of the track (tangential direction) are worse than those going from the center of the disc outward (radial direction).
Like fingerprints and smudges, several scratches close together can also overwhelm the error correction coding system capability.
 

Mikau94

Zora Warrior
Joined
Nov 3, 2009
Location
Termina Bay
Toothpaste can work, but if the game is having serious issues, get it buffed. If you are going to try to use toothpaste get a clean microfiber rag and toothpaste without the square crystals inside. Apply a good amount and let it sit for 5-10 minutes. Now if you gently without much pressure use another microfiber rag with a tiny water on it (damp, not soaked), rub the toothpaste off. If you have done it right you will remove the excess and some of the toothpaste will fill in the scratches.

I have moved around the world and had some disks that got beat up that I didn't think would work ever again and I used this method and now they work great. When I get back to the US, I will probably get them buffed for a buck each at used game store I love.

I hope this help!
 
Joined
Nov 30, 2011
This was on Nintendo's Wii support site, so it's the official way to clean the disc.

"Important Notes (please read first):

* ONLY USE straight strokes when wiping the disc (not a circular motion)

* ONLY USE a clean, soft, cotton cloth (not paper towels, facial tissue, etc.)

* ONLY USE water (not soap or any other cleaning solution)

* DO NOT use solvents such as: benzine, window cleaner, paint thinner, anti-static aerosol spray or abrasive cleaners to clean the disc.

* DO NOT use machines designed to clean discs or remove scratches. These types of devices have been known to damage the surface of the disc.



What to Do:

1. Dampen a clean, soft, cotton cloth with water.

2. Use straight strokes and wipe the disc (non-labeled side) from the inside rim to the outside rim.

3. Using a dry part of the cloth, repeat step 2 to dry the disc.

4. After all of the water is gone, let the disc sit for at least two minutes to completely dry before inserting it into the Wii console."
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2011
I just use tap water and toilet paper although I rarely need to clean them because I keep my stuff in tip top shape. Cloth usually makes scratches from the fibers. I cringe when one of my friends wipes off his disk for no reason with his shirt and then asks to borrow one of my games. I be like h*ll naw! lol.
 

MW7

Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Location
Ohio
I have an Xbox 360 game that was pretty beat up with scratches and wouldn't play. I tried wiping it down but that didn't help. Then I went to Gamestop and bought this kind of goo that helps repair discs. I rubbed it all over the Xbox disc and wiped it down and it somehow worked. I haven't had any more problems with that game and it was about two years ago that this happened. So if you get desperate then this might be worth trying. IIRC the disc repair goo was something like $15 for a tiny bottle (but honestly if you're anything like me the bottle has more than enough to last for a lifetime- I mean that most of my games stay in good shape).
 

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